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What Certifications will you gain as a Heavy equipment operator?

This includes all possible certifications you will gain in the process as a operator and what others you can gain additionally that can get you better jobs as one.

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John’s Answer

The best place to gather information on the Heavy Equipment Operator position, what training/certifications/licenses are needed, and where you can get this training is to ask the International Union of Operating Engineers. They should be able to answer your questions on the Heavy Equipment Operator position.

Another general information website on salary/wages/occupational training, etc. can be found with the little research on the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and their Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Lastly I recommend website research on Heavy Equipment Operator Training on the CAT website as well as the Associated Training Services site. This might be the best place to find out what training/certifications/licenses one might get while attending their schools.

Good Luck - John Fening
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Ximena’s Answer

once in with the union, they help you get all the certifications paid by them. no cost to you.
Thank you comment icon Hi Ximena! Good info. Can you tell Osvaldo the different Certifications needed? Sharyn Grose, Admin
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Osvaldo,

Heavy equipment operators can gain several certifications throughout their career, both mandatory and optional, to enhance their skills and employment opportunities. Here are some of the most common certifications:

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Certification: OSHA sets the standards for workplace safety in the United States. Heavy equipment operators must comply with these regulations to ensure a safe working environment. OSHA offers various training programs and certifications, including Construction Industry Training (CIT), which covers topics like hazard recognition, fall protection, scaffolding, and electrical safety.

National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO) Certification: NCCCO is a non-profit organization that provides certification programs for crane operators and other related occupations. NCCCO offers various types of crane operator certifications based on the type of crane being operated, such as tower cranes, mobile cranes, and overhead cranes.

American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Certification: ANSI sets the standards for heavy equipment operation in industries like construction and mining. ANSI certification demonstrates that an operator has met specific training requirements and can operate equipment safely and efficiently according to industry standards.

Technical Skills Assessment Program (TSAP) Certification: TSAP is a voluntary certification program offered by the National Center for Construction Education & Research (NCCER). It assesses an operator’s skills in various heavy equipment operations using standardized performance tests. TSAP certification can help operators demonstrate their expertise to potential employers and clients.

Additional certifications: Depending on the specific job or industry, heavy equipment operators may also choose to obtain additional certifications to expand their skillset and increase their employability. For example, they may pursue certifications in specialized equipment operation, such as bulldozers, excavators, or backhoes; or they may obtain certifications in areas like first aid or hazardous materials handling.**

Authoritative References Used:

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) - https://www.osha.gov/
National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO) - https://nccco.org/
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) - https://www.ansi.org/
National Center for Construction Education & Research (NCCER) - https://www.nccer.org/

God Bless You,
JC.
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