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What's a good job that's suitable for someone with a learning disability ?

I have a hard time gathering information mentally. I like result-driven, checking errors, and I like being hands on. Speech is very hard for me due to my learning disability, so I have a better time writing what I have to say clearly.

I have empathy. I love helping people go through their problems and I also have a strong passion for helping people.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Shane !

As you go along in life, you are going to have different outlooks and points of view and some of them may be about work you feel drawn to. Taking into consideration what criteria you have set for now, I would suggest becoming a Sign Language Interpreter. I can say that in the U.S. it pays very, very well and you can look into it more for the trends in Canada for this career. You can contact the Ontario Association of Sign Language Interpreters (OASLI) at the link below for their website.

Keep in mind that individuals with different (dis)abilities go to college and break barriers, even people that have learning disabilities go to college. There is always assistance and accommodations for students at college so please do not discount going to college to study a field of work that you really love. The college degree will take you far in the future. While in college, you will see yourself evolve and you will be introduced to possible careers. Right now you are thinking about possible careers that require very little speech and information gathering. Mostly all careers involve a certain amount of speech such as participating in meetings, giving presentations and a career in social services such as Case Management (helping people in that way) demands almost constant speaking throughout your work day. I think you can break the barriers by considering a vocational school or college. You really can do it.

Some other careers that come to mind that fit your current criteria are Auto Mechanic, Plumbing or Electrician, Carpentry, Custodian/Maintenance. Keep in mind that every job or career has gathering information at its' basis. Never let that stop you. Also, do not let anyone hold you back. You can follow your dream for any career you may want. But for now, some more jobs to consider that require very little speech are Security Guard, Medical Transcriber, Data Entry Clerk, Dog Walker, Medical Coder, Diesel Mechanic, Laboratory Technician, Accountant and Truck Driver.

Always remember that you literally can do anything you set your mind to. I hope this is helpful as you explore the many possibilities for your future !

Michelle recommends the following next steps:

ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETERS https://www.oasli.on.ca/
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the help. Shane
Thank you comment icon You are very welcome, Shane ! Michelle M.
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William’s Answer

Here are some jobs for people with learning disability:
Data Entry Clerk
Retail Officer
Gardener
Warehouse Worker
Office Assistant
Library Assistant
Custodian or Janitor
Landscaper
Pet Care Worker
Food Service Worker
Delivery Driver
Assembly Line Worker
Baker’s Assistant
Hotel Housekeeping
Technical Support Assistant
Farm Attendant
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Shane
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Kim’s Answer

Finding a suitable job that aligns with your strengths and accommodates your learning disability is absolutely possible, especially given your clear preferences and skills. Your ability to write clearly, your empathy, and your passion for helping others are valuable assets in many fields.

One potential career path you might consider is working as a data entry specialist or quality control inspector. These roles often involve checking for errors and ensuring accuracy, which aligns well with your interest in result-driven tasks and error-checking. Additionally, these jobs can be very hands-on and may require less verbal communication, allowing you to leverage your strong writing skills instead.

Another option could be a role in customer support or technical support, particularly in a written capacity. Many companies offer support through email or chat, where you can assist customers with their problems and provide solutions without needing to rely on verbal communication. Your empathy and desire to help people would be a great fit here, as you can offer support and understanding to those in need.

You might also explore careers in social work or counseling, particularly in roles that focus on written communication or behind-the-scenes support. For example, case management or administrative roles within social services organizations often require strong organizational skills and the ability to communicate effectively in writing. Your passion for helping people and your empathetic nature would be highly valued in these settings.

Additionally, consider roles in non-profit organizations where you can contribute to causes you care about. Positions such as grant writing, program coordination, or volunteer management often involve a lot of written communication and organizational tasks, allowing you to make a meaningful impact while working within your strengths.

Remember, it's important to find a work environment that understands and supports your needs. Look for employers who value diversity and inclusivity and who are willing to make reasonable accommodations to help you succeed. With your empathy, passion for helping others, and clear communication skills, you have a lot to offer in any of these roles.
Thank you comment icon You rock! This advice is very helpful. Shane
Thank you comment icon You're welcome!!! Kim Arskii
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Shane,

Job Suggestions for Individuals with Learning Disabilities: Specific Recommendations for Shane

Based on the information provided, Shane is looking for a job that is suitable for someone with a learning disability. Shane has difficulty gathering information mentally, but excels in result-driven tasks, checking for errors, and enjoys being hands-on. Shane also has a strong passion for helping people and finds speaking challenging due to the learning disability.

Considering these factors, here are some job suggestions that would be a good fit for Shane:

1. Data Analysis

Data analysis involves organizing, interpreting, and processing complex data to identify trends, patterns, and insights. This job would be a good fit for Shane because it is result-driven and allows for a hands-on approach. Shane’s difficulty with gathering information mentally can be mitigated by using technology and software to process data.

Additionally, data analysis requires a strong attention to detail and the ability to check for errors, which plays to Shane’s strengths. Shane’s passion for helping people can be fulfilled by using data analysis to solve real-world problems and make informed decisions.

2. Quality Control Technician

A quality control technician is responsible for inspecting and testing products to ensure they meet quality standards. This job would be a good fit for Shane because it is hands-on and involves checking for errors. Shane’s difficulty with gathering information mentally can be mitigated by using checklists and procedures to guide the inspection and testing process.

Furthermore, quality control technicians often work in teams, providing Shane with the opportunity to collaborate with others and contribute to a shared goal. Shane’s passion for helping people can be fulfilled by ensuring that products are safe and reliable for consumers.

3. Technical Writer

A technical writer creates instruction manuals, user guides, and other technical documents. This job would be a good fit for Shane because it allows for a hands-on approach and involves writing, which Shane has expressed is a strength. Shane’s difficulty with gathering information mentally can be mitigated by using research and documentation to inform the writing process.

Additionally, technical writing requires a strong attention to detail and the ability to check for errors, which plays to Shane’s strengths. Shane’s passion for helping people can be fulfilled by providing clear and concise instructions that enable users to effectively use products and services.

Conclusion

Shane is looking for a job that is suitable for someone with a learning disability. Based on Shane’s strengths and interests, data analysis, quality control technician, and technical writing are all good job options. These jobs are result-driven, involve checking for errors, and allow for a hands-on approach. Additionally, they provide Shane with the opportunity to use writing as a strength and contribute to a shared goal of solving real-world problems and helping people.

Authoritative References Used:

National Center on Learning Disabilities
Understood
LDA America

God Bless You,
JC.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for giving me advice. Shane
Thank you comment icon Thank you guys so much for the suggestions! Shane
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Lora’s Answer

Shane - I am going to piggyback on what others have suggested for you. Considering your preference for the written word, have you considered journalism? You can write, edit, research, etc. without needing to do a lot of face-to-face work. It is a career offered by almost all universities and colleges and the advisors at these schools have great hands-on knowledge about what your focus might be. Such foci might be sports, music, politics, etc. You will definitely have a lot of options - keep asking and keep looking! Good luck
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for the advice. Shane
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Annah’s Answer

Shane,
having a learning disability means you get to learn everything about this disability- how it impacts every aspect of your life. Discover your learning style and learn ways to work with this disability. It does not need to get in the way of what you want to do, but you will need to understand how it works- how it shows up in your life. Be your own private investigator. If you have not already done so, meet with a counselor, psychologist, or academic support person who is well-versed in the disability you have. There are gifts to having a learning disability as well- it may allow you to have a unique perspective or outlook on life. If you have a formal diagnosis, seek all the academic support you can get. Sometimes extra time is allowed for test taking for instance. As far as choosing a career, you mentioned having a passion for helping others. As a clinical psychotherapist I have worked with other (professionals) who have a range of disabilities (developmental, learning, physical)- from Autism, Dyslexia to having a stutter or living with Multiple Sclerosis. They are all successful in their careers and lives, but their success did not happen in a vacuum. They sought support or continue to seek support for their individual challenges. Depending upon the disability you have and the extent it impacts you, you can determine your strengths and weaknesses. Let this guide you in discovering your gaps in learning (or understanding) and to continue to leverage your strengths. It may be helpful for you to talk with others who have a similar disability, peer support can be quite powerful! Think about how this disability may help you in life. What is your super-power? For instance, a person with ADHD may also have the ability to hyper-focus. I myself have ADHD; I have had to learn ways of mitigating the aspects that can inhibit me from doing my job well. I have also found aspects that are useful- allowing me to tune-out background noise. With every diagnosis or disability there is a spectrum regarding its impact. This is why it is harmful and incorrect to generalize. I wish you luck in getting to know yourself and being the best you, you can be!
Thank you comment icon Loved reading this, thanks! Shane
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Chinyere’s Answer

Hello Shane,


Some potential job options for someone with a learning disability and the described preferences and strengths could include:

1. Data entry clerk: This job involves entering and verifying data, which requires attention to detail and a hands-on approach. It also allows for minimal verbal communication.

2. Quality control inspector: This role involves checking products or processes for errors or defects, which aligns with the preference for being result-driven and checking errors.

3. Technical writer: This career involves writing clear, concise instructions or documentation. It leverages strong writing skills while minimizing the need for verbal communication.

4. Support worker or counselor: These roles involve providing assistance and empathy to individuals in need, aligning with the passion for helping people navigate their problems.

Individuals with learning disabilities possess unique strengths and abilities, making it crucial to consider their individual interests and talents when considering job opportunities. Additionally, seeking accommodations in the workplace can be instrumental in ensuring success in a chosen career path.

Best wishes.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, Chinyere! Shane
Thank you comment icon Glad I could help! Chinyere Okafor
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