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What are the best ways to prepare for a job interview?

I get really nervous before a job interview and feel like I may come across as less confident because of my nerves.
#job-skills #jobinterviews #confidence


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Shamelle’s Answer

Hi Elizabeth,

First congratulate yourself on having a great resume. If you are getting calls for an interview, you must have a great resume. Second, some great ways to prepare for an interview are the following: Ask a friend or family member to go over some questions with you so you can practice saying your answers out loud.  Third, go to YouTube and look for videos to watch on job interviews so you can pick up some technics. The old saying "practice makes perfect"


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Chris’s Answer

Elizabeth,  the people who make an impression when I interview them are the people who show confidence and know their story.   On top of the good info in the other answers I would also suggest mental reps.  Picture yourself in the interview.  Picture the questions and practice your answers.  Like an athlete making a jump they picture themselves being successful.  This can be the same for interviews.  Picture you having a successful interview.


Know your story.  What are your strengths?  What have you accomplished?  The employer/hiring manager is looking for someone to come in and be successful.  I need a task completed.  What makes you the person?  How do you make my job easier?  What value are you bringing?  Mental reps will help you picture a successful situation and allow you to relax and enjoy the experience.


Have questions ready for the interviewer.  An interview is a two way street.  The employer needs to know you are the right person for the job, but you also need to know this is a good fit for you.


Keep a great attitude!  I've hired people with zero experience in my industry.  Why?  Because task specific training can teach a person how to do the job.  A great attitude is difficult to teach, but really needed in a team environment.


GOOD LUCK!


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Kamilah’s Answer

The best way to prepare for a job interview is to role play with a family member first before your interview a couple of time to become confident. Also, talk to yourself in the mirror to watch your facial expressions when you're talking.

Kamilah recommends the following next steps:

Watch some videos (if avail) on interviews for the job that you're going to to get a gist of what you be getting asked.

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Erica’s Answer

Hello Elizabeth. So glad you posted this awesome question and shared that interviewing makes your nervous. Being nervous in an interview is very common and actually tells me you care about how you're perceived. So, getting over nervousness in an interview takes practice and most importantly to believe in yourself. Many of the previous comments provide very good advice and much of which I too have put to use.

I begin my preparation for interviews with researching the company and position before I applied for. Some good sources are Linkedin, Glassdoor and Indeed. Before I go into an interview I create a mantra, a personal pep talk, that helps me focus on why I am the best candidate for the job, what I bring to a company and review all the points about the position where my strengths will be put to use. Being prepared for any event helps with those nerves taking hold and will increase your confidence. Lastly, I'll bring those discussion points into my interview and review back to them. Good luck!


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Kevin’s Answer

Always remember that they saw something in you worthy to interview, take the confidence that they chose you out of all the other applicants as a start.

Personally, I have learned to use a worry stone in my pocket before I enter the interview room. I have a tendency to be a fidgeter, so I do my best to exercise that out first.


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Shaina’s Answer

As other people have said - practice with others. Ask a couple people to give you a mock interview. Look online for common behavioral interview questions, and also common interview questions in your particular field.

As a hiring manager, I have interviewed many people, and have also participated in many interviews before becoming a hiring manager. One important thing to know is that, in my experience, it's been very common for hiring managers and interviewers to acknowledge (afterward in some type of debrief or review discussion) what a candidate's level of anxiety or nervousness was during the interview. We try to differentiate the knowledge and skills that the candidate might have, from their level of anxiety in the interview the best we can so as to not hold that against a candidate.

Even if you end up a little nervous, it's not necessarily going to hold you back! Just do the best you can. If you can pump yourself up before the interview, do it - look for people to send you positive notes and affirmations.


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Susanne’s Answer

If you are applying for a job in Europe, I would advise you to be prepared to be switching languages during the interview. Further, when I interview, I do not ask the questions candidates prepare for, I rather go for questions like Why should I NOT be hiring you?, What would you best friend/former boss tell me about you?, what is not on your CV that you would like to tell me?

a good interviewer will ask your examples, how you handled certain situations, etc, they won't ask you to walk them through your resume.


hope that was helpful. all the best


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crest’s Answer

Hi Elizabeth,

What's worked for me during interviews is coming prepared with a notebook. In this notebook, I've written down the key skills that the job description has listed, and provided at least one strong example of how I have done that work in the past. I do this with all of the key skills and the bonus skills if applicable. I also think about and write down answers to most commonly asked questions similar to, how have you worked with so and so position in the past?. I will also write down questions that I want to ask, like, what does a person in this position need to accomplish to be successful within this job in the next month, 3 months, 6 months, and year?

With these at hand, when an interviewer is asking you a question, you can reference your notes! Interviewers also love seeing that you've come prepared - no one memorizes everything.

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John’s Answer

Aloha from the great state of Hawaii. You must have some sought after skills and positive character traits to be in the interview phase of the application process. Congratulations on making it that far. The stress of the unknown can be daunting at first but don't allow it to get the best of you.

I would suggest sitting down with a friend, family member, or mentor who you trust would have the time and focus to put you through a mini stress test by proving you with a mock interview. I do this with my subordinates when they are up for promotions. It is a great chance t knock off some jitters and also helps you formulate you words better. For me, my inner dialogue is straight fire!, but then i open my mouth and its barely even able to be considered incoherent drivel. It just takes practice and confidence.

Another suggestion I would make is to do some research on the company/organization that you wish to become a part of. Look into the media, their CEOs/Founders, recent acquisitions or expansion projects, or any real noteworthy items of consideration to show them that you are genuinely interested in being part of a team and not just another sponge who is there get get a paycheck since they happen to call you back. I would expect for the interviewers to know a little about you since it is a standard HR move now to get a feel for a prospective gain by looking at social media accounts and criminal pasts (if any). Why wouldn't you want to do the same for your potential employer?

Lastly, if you know someone at the organization, ask them to lunch and ask for some helpful hints, tips, and conversational pieces that were mentioned during their interview to get a better idea of the questions to expect. When i conduct an interview for a potential candidate, I am looking to have an honest conversation with someone and not scripted and robotic responses. Before you know it, if an interview is conducted correctly, you realize it was just two people in a room getting to know each other.

Be yourself, smile, be friendly and polite, show case your positive attributes, and remind them why they called you in for the interview in the first place.

John recommends the following next steps:

Dress for the job you want...But don't show up dressed as Batman. It might not go as planned.

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