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what's the best career? Lawyer or a therapist?

I'm good at giving advice to people and I like to hear their problems I want to be able to help them but I would also like to be a lawyer because I don't like when people get in some kind of situation that they had nothing to do with it. I feel like becoming a therapist would be something I won't easily give up on but I also want to be a lawyer but as I research more about becoming a lawyer my hopes keep going down. #law #therapy #lawyers

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Teresa’s Answer

Hi Maria,


I am not sure which is the best. I am a lawyer and I enjoy what I do. I get to help people. Good luck!

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Daniela’s Answer

Maria!!


There is a career in psychology, nominated legal psychology.


A good place to start is with an undergraduate degree in psychology. These programs generally include 120 semester credit hours, which, if attending school full-time, can be completed in four years. Additional coursework in criminal justice at the undergraduate level would be beneficial as well. Graduate school is an absolute must in order to break into the legal psychology field. Graduate work in psychology, criminology, criminal justice, or the law would be excellent choices. There are even some programs that combine graduate studies in psychology with those in the law, resulting in a master’s degree in a specific discipline in psychology, such as clinical psychology, as well as a Juris Doctor (J.D.).


A primary function of legal psychologists is to evaluate and assess individuals for various court systems and legal bodies. In this context, a legal psychologist may evaluate a wide variety of people, from a parent seeking custody of a minor child to an inmate scheduled to go to trial for murder. Regardless of the individual being evaluated, legal psychologists rely on their training in human behavior to offer an unbiased assessment of the individual. To carry out this function, legal psychologists might conduct interviews or administer psychological tests to individuals facing criminal or civil charges. They may also work with witnesses to help them recall information or serve as consultants in law enforcement investigations.


A legal psychologist can work in a variety of settings involving the criminal justice system, or civil court system. They are more research-oriented than the related, but more clinically oriented forensic psychologist. They may work out of an office, providing consultation to other professionals, such as attorneys in private practice, state/county prosecutors, or public defenders. They may work with a civil or probate court.


More detailed information in: http://www.psychologyschoolguide.net/psychology-careers/legal-psychologist/


Have a great career!

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Charles M’s Answer

here's a few questions. Do you like solving problems for people or do you like to help people solve their own problems?
Are you obsessive about details (like the details of the definitions of words, the details of what the laws really mean) or are you open to seeing lots of different points of view and not make judgements about which is right or wrong, but only what is more or less effective?


My experience is that lawyers solve problems FOR people. They gather the information, figure out a strategy and then work to get it done.


Therapists on the other hand, let people talk, ask them questions, present a few ideas and help people figure things out for themselves by examining their point of view and comparing it with what is known to be effective. Perhaps training them in new communication skills.


Which one sounds like you?

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