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Is human resources a good major?

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What is human resources?
What can you do with a degree in human resources?
Are there a lot of opportunities for employment in the field of human resources?
If you majored in human resources, what did you do with your degree?


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Carole’s Answer

Yes I believe that Human Resources is a very good major especially if you like the business environment. There are a few ways to find out if this career is a good choice for you:1. Here are a few suggestions: : If you haven't done a Career Assessment profile, which you can usually get in the Career Center of your High School or college, This assessment will give you choices of careers after taking the assessment.Definitely research this career by asking someone who is doing this career, and ask questions on what they do and what they like and if you can shadow them for a day or two; 3. If you see a job listing for an assistant in an office you might want to interview with them for the job if you can qualify; 4. you also might like to volunteer if that is a possibility in a HR department;5 along with taken a career Assessment you can take a personality Assessment,
that will also be in the career center and it will put together which careers that are best for you within your the answer your specific personality.
6. Sometimes there are Internships through your Guidance Counselor and you should ask that question after you take the assessments. If your family knows of someone in that line of human resource you try and get that persons name and see if you can ask the questions I suggested before. 7. I also recommend studying a few business classes maybe in summer or through a business program, and if you are in a college situation
talk with you counselor about a business degree and what classes will help you to get ahead.
I hope this helps you in your research. Best of luck

Carole recommends the following next steps:

Take the Career and personality assessment for sure to make sure this is the career that interests you
There is a good book called"Do What You Are" by PaulTieger & Barbara Barron
Talk with Career or Guidance Counselor
Check out Volunteer jobs and Internships

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Kim’s Answer

Human Resources is the field that works for a company or organization's own employees - hiring, training, compensation, termination, etc.


Compensation and Benefits: These people do an analysis to make sure that you are being paid competitively with the current market (or a percentage thereof, as directed by upper mgt). They will also shop for healthcare options and other benefits.


Training and Development: They do the training. Sometimes from programs they develop themselves, sometimes from programs they buy. Much training has gone to Computer Based Training, reducing, but not eliminating, the need for these positions.


Applicant Processing: They keep up with the applications, and refer applicants out to the hiring managers. They may also do the "on-boarding," which is the processing of new hires, making sure all required paperwork is completed. Also do recruiting, going to college and other job fairs.


Labor Relations: If there is a union involved, these employees do the contract negotiations.


Generalists and Specialists: May work in one of the above fields, or in general Human Resources. They handle "issues." Workers Comp, Unemployment Claims, Grievances, ADA accommodations, going out on sick leave/FMLA, discrimination/retaliation complaints, etc.


Is Human Resources a good major? That depends on you! Sadly, my experience with the HR Dept. at two employers has not been good. And, working at the Workforce Center, I have heard too many bad stories. These concern situations where employees have taken legitimate concerns to HR, only to find that HR does nothing to help them, and instead does whatever it can to protect the company and the managers who have wronged them. I have, however, heard of one or two good companies out there who truly believe in ethics and morals - if you can find a company like that to work for, then, it would be a good job. Look beyond the mission/vision/core values. Research the company thoroughly!


Kim


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Shana’s Answer

I see the balance of HR as a major and a career. I've been practicing HR for 25+ years - it's been rewarding for the most part. I only wish one of my professors would have addressed the reality of what HR practitioners do. Recruitment, total rewards, performance management, legislation advice, employee relations, helping to shape a culture.... the list is endless and varied and all pretty exciting. But there are also terminations, and downsizing and often seeing people battle some of their worst days.


Like any career, it has its ups and downs and it's important to let people know when choosing HR as a major that as they advance their careers, they often have to engage in the more negative side of what we do, and it's not for everyone.


My best advice - eyes wide open when picking any major. Talk to professionals in the field if you can before you choose. And make sure your major can lead to a career that will make you happy.



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Abbey’s Answer

As many others have suggested, HR being a "good" major depends on you as an individual. There are a lot of different areas you can specialize in, but I do think it is important to note, that in essentially every HR job, you are a resource for others. your workload will often be dependent on the needs of others.

You get to do wonderful things with helping others develop, promote, etc. But, you are often times the complaint department as well. It all depends on your personality in my opinion.

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Diane’s Answer

Yes, the HR field is very diverse and has a variety of disciplines (topics) that can support many areas of interest. For example, if you are an extrovert and not intimidated to meet new people and learn about their careers, you can explore the Recruitment discipline. Extroverts also work well in Employee Relations and Performance Management. If you are more of an introvert and want to stay behind the scenes, you can explore the administrative disciplines like HRIS Analyst or Payroll (some organizations) or Benefits Administration. The market seems to always support HR roles since the function is needed when a company is growing, and also need if a company is downsizing. Overall, if you become a valuable resource to an HR function or department, there is always work to be done!


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Luis’s Answer

Hi!

HR major is one of the best majors! I really like HR particularly because I like people and I like developing relationships. However, that is not say that if you like to be behind the scenes that HR is not the major for you!

What can you do with a degree in human resources?
- Recruiting
- Operations
- Talent Acquisition
- Diversity & Inclusions
- Data Analytics

Are there a lot of opportunities for employment in the field of human resources?
- Yes!I think that although a lot of things will be automated soon, its really hard to automate "human interaction".

If you majored in human resources, what did you do with your degree?
- I went into People Operations, which in this role, we really do a lot of the behind the scenes work, offer letters, data entry & maintenance, and employee support.

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Ken’s Answer

The answer to this question is an individual one, as the area of Human Resources has a vast array of applications. Getting to know yourself better and getting to know people in this area will allow you to determine if this is a good major for you to pursue.


Getting to know yourself and how your personality traits relate to people involved in various career opportunities is very important in your decision making process. During my many years in Human Resources and College Recruiting, I ran across too many students who had skipped this very important step and ended up in a job situation which for which they were not well suited. Selecting a career area is like buying a pair of shoes. First you have to be properly fitted for the correct size, and then you need to try on and walk in the various shoe options to determine which is fits the best and is most comfortable for you to wear. Following are some important steps which I developed during my career which have been helpful to many .

Ken recommends the following next steps:

The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
Next, when you have the results of the testing, talk to the person at your high school and college who tracks and works with graduates to arrange to talk to, visit, and possibly shadow people doing what you think that you might want to do, so that you can get know what they are doing and how they got there. Here are some tips: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. You can locate them by asking your school academic advisor, favorite teachers, and the reference librarian at your local library. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##

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Michael’s Answer

HR was a good major for my career however you will have to evaluate whether or not it will be a good major for your personal situation. When I went back to school to get a HR degree I had a non HR leadership position and I was trying to learn a new skill set. I believe the knowledge you gain with a HR degree can help you in the professional world even if you don't have a HR titled position. As a manager, I complete many HR related items and having knowledge in areas like employment law is a great asset. I have now moved into an operations role that is directly connected to the hiring and training of new employees. I am able to use my education to help me with my job duties. Overall, there are many areas of a business that a HR degree can come in handy and may be a great way to diversify your skill set.


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Lauren’s Answer

I think that if you know that HR is the field you want to go into then it makes sense to major in it. I personally majored in HR, and have worked in only HR roles since graduating.

Like others have mentioned, with a degree in HR you can decide to either specialize in a center of excellence (Benefits, Compensation etc) or can work in general HR which means you work with and support the different areas of HR.


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Shanel’s Answer

I majored in Human Resources, and also ended up getting my M.A in Human Resources/Industrial Relations. What I find most motivating and interesting about the field of HR is that there are so many different specialties and it is constantly evolving. Depending on what you're most interested in, you can be in HR roles that are behind the scenes, direct facing to employees and leadership. Networking with individuals in HR can give you more insight into what each type of role entails. Just like any career, there are challenging and rewarding aspects to it. You have the ability in HR to positively impact employees and influence their day to day work environment.


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Kristen’s Answer

I found HR an excellent field to work in, and wish I had majored in it! (I was an English major). There are so many areas of the field, that appeal to anyone's skills: recruiting, compensation, benefits management, talent development/training, HR information systems (IT). Getting a degree in HR isn't necessary, as there are many certification programs online to gain the skills and knowledge. Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM) and Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI) offer courses and are excellent ways to network and learn the field.

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Jackie’s Answer

Human resources major is a broad degree that involves both business, pschology, maths, etc. He needs people have good communcation skills, broad view, patience, strong sense of numbers. It is definitely helpful to the people who want to do HR jobs.

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Shana’s Answer

I think Human Resources is a great major, there so many areas of study in human resources and the level of pay is pretty good as well. You can go into training and development, recruiting or become an HR Manager.


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