3 answers

Double Major in Psychology & Nutrition?

Asked DeKalb, Illinois

So, I’m a senior in college & I’m now questioning all of my life decisions. Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE psychology. But I’m just now realizing throughout the years I’ve always had such a strong passion for nutrition & I don’t know what to do. My original plan was to go to grad school & get my masters in school psychology. I’m now realizing that that’s something I just don’t want to do anymore. If I could just start over & get a bachelors degree is nutrition & dietetics & becomes a nutritionist I 100% would. But now I feel like it’s way too late to do anything about it and I should just finish my psychology undergrad degree and apply for graduate school even though I don’t think I will get in nor do I truly want to do it. What would my possibilities be if I got a bachelor’s degree in psychology and nutrition? My parents are so set on me going to grad school that before I mention anything to them I need to have a set plan. I feel like I’ve wasted so much of their money being almost done and realizing my passion isn’t psychology. I just really don’t know what to do or where/who to turn to. Can I still succeed in life? #psychology #college-major #career #nutrition #doublemajor #confused #psychologynutrition #nutritionist

3 answers

G. Mark’s Answer

Updated

Before you get pessimistic about switching, do your due diligence. Get a list of the classes required for each and look for overlap. Then see if some of the classes can be substituted for credit in your new degree program. This is best done by conferring with advisors for both majors. I was in computer science before switching to engineering. While the material overlapped quite a bit, the classes for each were largely different versions taught in different colleges. By investigation and getting advice, I was able to substitute many classes, particularly math classes. The versions were slightly different, with the engineering versions having more practical than theoretical focus, and the theoretical classes in engineering being in other areas. But it turned out the university did give me permission to do that, saving some hours. It couldn't hurt to try. Also, you might see if there are different versions of those degrees, which might have slightly different requirements. Your best bet is an enthusiastic counselor.

Ken’s Answer

Updated Cleveland, Ohio

Don't worry. Help is closer than you think!


You are looking at some very interesting areas, but the first thing that would help answer your question is for you to get to know yourself better to see how your personality traits relate to career areas and then talk to people who are inthose appropriate career areas to see what they do, how they got there, and what advice and suggestions that they might have for you.


Getting to know yourself and how your personality traits relate to people involved in various career opportunities is very important in your decision making process. During my many years in Human Resources and College Recruiting, I ran across too many students who had skipped this very important step and ended up in a job situation which for which they were not well suited. Selecting a career area is like buying a pair of shoes. First you have to be properly fitted for the correct size, and then you need to try on and walk in the various shoe options to determine which is fits the best and is most comfortable for you to wear. Following are some important steps which I developed during my career which have been helpful to many .

Ken recommends the following next steps:

  • The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
  • The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
  • Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. You can locate them by asking your school academic advisor, favorite teachers, and the reference librarian at your local library. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
  • • It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##
  • • It really does not matter what school you attend, as the most important factors are how well you do with the school work, which is an indication to an employer about what kind of employee you will be, and the effort that you put forth in your networking to set up networking connections that will help you throughout your education/career journey. Here is an important video for you to watch: ## http://www.ted.com/talks/julie_lythcott_haims_how_to_raise_successful_kids_without_over_parenting?utm_campaign=social&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_content=talk&utm_term=education ##
Updated
Here are some good tips on reducing college expenses. Too many people spend way too much on an education and end up with unnecessarily high debt. ## http://www.educationplanner.org/students/paying-for-school/ways-to-pay/reduce-college-costs.shtml ##

Kim’s Answer

Updated San Antonio, Texas

I'm looking for a nutritionist who can find a way to get me to stop eating peanut butter straight from the jar. I bet someone with a psychology background could help!


Yes, I am serious. So, there is lots of overlap between various professional fields, even if you find no overlap in the degrees. The thing you don't want to do is keep going down the wrong path. And, it could be that psychology is not the wrong path, but, you just envision it in traditional sort of ways, rather than thinking about all the creative ways psychology applies to life in general. Speaking of which, what about being a life coach? I'm saying I'm not so sure psychology is out of the question. It is highly transferable. Give that some thought first!


When you envision yourself as a nutritionist, how do you picture your work day? Are you working with diabetic patients, weight loss clients, health enthusiasts, in a hospital, a gym, what? Try to envision that, and then think about related jobs you could get using the psychology.


No, it is NEVER the end of the road - yes, you can still succeed in life. It's not all nearly as black and white as people are leading today's youth to believe. Chart your own course!!!


Kim