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Do you ever feel like it gets gross when being a nurse?

I dont like germs but, nurses interest me. I want to know if you ignore the germs when being a nurse. Please help! #nurse

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CareerVillage’s Answer

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Take a look at this post from allnurses.com:


"I am a neonatal ICU nurse. Last night I was feeding a baby, and had her wrapped in TWO blankets. She was wearing a diaper. I lifted her up to burp her, and when I put her back down afterwards I noticed this lovely green stain about the size of my hand, wrist to fingertip, spread all over my beautiful uniform. This baby had horrendous diarrhea and it was pure liquid, and it leaked all over me. I had to change shirts. ;>) Later, I was bathing another baby who decided to projectile vomit partially digested formula all over me. Have you ever smelled partially digested formula? I had to change shirts. Again. ;>P This morning, I was giving report and a nurse said, 'UH-oh...this baby had a huge bowel movement.' I clapped my hands in glee (believe me, in NICU this is almost always a good thing...). I shouldn't have. I went to the Isolette and this baby was covered head to toe, literally, in seedy yellow stool. It was everywhere and it looked like whole grain mustard. Yum. I got her cleaned up, sheets changed, the works. I lifted her bottom to put a clean diaper under her (the THIRD DIAPER I'd had to use, as she kept on going, despite my pleas for her to stop) and she shot off like a cannon. Imagine a pastry tube filled with yellow frosting. Imagine putting it on the floor. Now imagine stomping on the end of it with your foot as hard as you can. Wow...watch that stream of frosting! That was what it was like. It shot out three feet from her bottom and sprayed the wall. I have never seen anything like it. And it was all over my arms and hands. Now. This was a particularly messy night on my unit. It was a little gross. And thank god I wasn't actually holding that baby when she blew because I surely would have dropped her from the shock I felt seeing such a magnificent feat come from such a tiny little hole. I walked out of there wearing a paper scrub top and grinning my ass off because I love my job more than anything and can't imagine doing anything else. It takes a little time to get used to it. Some people never do. I am one of the lucky ones, I guess. My job is important, it's ESSENTIAL, and it makes me feel great. I feel worthwhile. I feel completely validated. Hopefully you'll feel the same way. If not, there's always nursing administration. ;>) lol Good luck in your endeavor!"


For more responses on whether the nursing experience can be gross, go to:
http://allnurses.com/nursing-career-advice/how-gross-messy-25434.html

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H’s Answer

Nursing can be gross at times. An example would be sometimes you have to clean up vomit and other bodily functions. Sometimes you get those bodily functions on you.
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Gary’s Answer

If I read the question and the description, it looks like your question is REALLY about germs, as opposed to the other gross things that you might face in a hospital or a doctor's office. As far as germs go, yes there are a lot of germs when you're working in healthcare. But on the other hand, there are many procedures put in place to prevent the spread of viruses, bacteria, and so on. In fact, as a nurse, that's really one of your most important responsibilities -- to ensure that the healthcare environment remains sanitary. That means simple things like washing your hands thoroughly and wearing gloves, and it also means observing protocol when working with patients who may have communicable diseases.

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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Shatasia,

As a nurse, dealing with germs is an inevitable part of the job. While it may seem gross to some individuals, nurses are trained to follow strict infection control protocols to minimize the risk of spreading germs and maintain a clean and safe environment for both patients and healthcare providers. Nurses understand the importance of hand hygiene, wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) when necessary, and following proper sanitation practices to prevent the transmission of infections.

Nurses need to have a good understanding of microbiology and infection control principles to effectively manage and prevent the spread of germs in healthcare settings. While it is natural to have concerns about germs, especially in a healthcare environment where exposure is higher, nurses are trained to prioritize patient safety and adhere to best practices to ensure optimal care delivery.

Nurses do not ignore germs; instead, they are vigilant in their efforts to maintain a hygienic environment and prevent infections. By following established protocols and guidelines, nurses can effectively manage the risks associated with germs while providing compassionate care to their patients.

In conclusion, while dealing with germs may be challenging for some individuals, nurses play a crucial role in infection prevention and control by following strict protocols and best practices to ensure patient safety and well-being.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): The CDC is a leading national public health institute in the United States that provides evidence-based guidelines and recommendations on infection control practices for healthcare settings.

World Health Organization (WHO): The WHO is a specialized agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health. It offers global guidance on infection prevention and control measures for healthcare professionals.

American Nurses Association (ANA): The ANA is the premier organization representing the interests of the nation’s 4 million registered nurses. It sets standards for nursing practice, including guidelines on infection control and prevention strategies.

These sources were instrumental in providing accurate and up-to-date information on infection control practices in nursing.

GOD BLESS!
James.
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