3 answers

How can I become a succesful finacial analyist, is it personality, is it being good with numbers whats the key?

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3 answers

Jennifer’s Answer

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Hi Irma - I am not a financial analyst but I have a minor in supply chain so I took several business classes in college. From my experience at school and now in a corporate work environment, I would say both know how and personality are important for this career path.


  • Know your stuff - go to college and get a degree in Finance or Accounting depending on what you would like to do
  • Practice your speaking skills any chance you get (both formal and informal speaking) - a lot of times how well you 'sell' an idea is almost more important than the idea itself. If you are confident and cool under pressure you will have more success in getting people on board with your idea/position/argument.
  • Know your audience - understanding your audience will allow you to tailor your findings to how they best communicate, again helping you be more successful in whatever it is you are working on

I hope someone with more experience comes by and gives this answer a go, but I think the main takeaway from my comment is that there is no single 'key' to being a successful financial analyst. You need to be able to do both the numbers side and the people side of the business to stand out.

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Kathleen’s Answer

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I worked as a successful financial analyst for 10+ years.  First you must have a strong background in numbers, math, finance and preferably accounting.  It will be critical that you perfect your Microsoft Excel skills and your access database skills.  Next, I would recommend working on your presentation (speaking, leading meetings) and PowerPoint skills.  95% of my work was for executive level presentations that needed to be clear and understandable.  Its not enough to be able to compute the numbers, you have to be able to summarize and explain the results and how they will affect the business.


Many companies hire financial analysts directly from undergrad programs, but they do look for finance or business related majors or degrees.  If you want to advance within the career, plan on going further and getting a graduate degree -  MBA in Finance.  Some people choose to do this straight after undergrad school, some choose to wait and let their company help them pay for grad school.  A lot of the bigger companies offer tuition assistance if you are studying a degree that will further your learning in your current job title.


If you are a very good student in college, a few of the Fortune 500 companies offer a financial ROTATION program.  That is a program where you come into the company, they move you from job to job and teach you every aspect of finance and at the end of 3+ years, you get a promotion.  These are great ways to build your financial career and will sometimes also help you find a mentor within the company.  I did such a program and I had rotations in Budgeting, Financial Analysis and Long Term Planning.  And my last rotation assignment was in an international city in Europe which my mentor helped to obtain.


Kathleen recommends the following next steps:

  • Research the colleges with the best undergrad business programs and apply to those programs. Look for the Top 50 schools in Forbes or Fortune magazine articles.
  • Just for fun and so you understand what the requirements of the job are, sign up for Monster.com or Glassdoor.com (job search websites) and search for job listings with the key words financial analyst in your city. You will be able to see what types of companies are looking for that title and also what they list as the important skills needed. This will give you some goals to reach for when you are in college.
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Saron’s Answer

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Hi Irma,

I'm not a financial analyst but I have been a business analyst and I studied marketing and supply chain management in undergrad. I would definitely say to succeed in finance and/or as a financial analyst, it is great to build business acumen, analysis, and communication skills. If there are any internship or apprentice opportunities (doesn't have to be paid) where you can learn first hand what financial analysts do, that could be a starting point. You can even ask someone who has a financial analyst role if you could shadow them for a day to really understand what they do. Once you have an idea, you can see what areas within finance or the financial analyst role specifically speaks to you. Then, when you go to college, you can major in finance, information systems, accounting, or a specific area you like. For example, if a financial analyst performs data analysis often and you like that area, you may want to major in data analytics as a minor (if offered at your school) or something similar.

Also, there are many courses you can take at your free time to learn about finance and what it means to be a financial analyst. If you look at Udemy, there's a an array of options. Here's one: https://www.udemy.com/course/the-complete-financial-analyst-course/?utm_source=adwords&utm_medium=udemyads&utm_campaign=FinancialAnalysis_v.PROF_la.EN_cc.US_ti.5800&utm_content=deal4584&utm_term=_._ag_82041656804_._ad_420694847723_._kw__._de_c_._dm__._pl__._ti_dsa-774930028529_._li_1014895_._pd__._&matchtype=b&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIxZ7Sy_-z6QIVAWyGCh3h9g-6EAAYAiAAEgKav_D_BwE.

I hope this helps!
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