2 answers

How long is the process in becoming a Criminal Justice Lawyer?

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I am a high school student and I am looking forward in becoming a lawyer. I would like to the process in becoming a lawyer and more specific a criminal justice lawyer. #law #lawyer #criminal-justice #criminal-law #women-in-law

2 answers

Patrick A.’s Answer

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Although I'm not a practicing criminal justice lawyer, I can tell you that the normal process for almost any area of law consists of the following (the last point is specific to your question):

-Four years of undergraduate education; -Study for and take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) before finishing undergraduate studies; -Apply for and attempt to receive admission to a accredited law school prior to finishing your undergraduate studies; -Three years of law school; -Finish law school and sit for the state bar exam; -Pass the bar exam; and -Get a job at the district attorney's office in the sate where you passed the state bar exam.

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Hello Patrick A. Dunn thank you so much for responding to my question. I will take these into consideration. I will also look into more of these. This advice will help me throughout the long run.
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Also Patrick A. Dunn I would also like to know more of your job and everyday life.
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Sure...I practice energy and corporate law in-house (i.e., I'm an employee of a company instead of a law firm), everyday is different and regardless of how much I know, there's always something new to discover. My days are relatively long, 6:45 am - 5:45 pm, give or take an hour each day. You often take work home and spend some amount of time during the weekends either thinking through issues, drafting documents or discussing issues with business partners or outside counsel. It sounds miserable but it's actually very rewarding. I love what I do and can't imagine doing anything else.

steve’s Answer

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Mr. Dunn is correct. A 4 year undergraduate degree, LSAT, and 3 year law school degree. The bar exam is also required in the jurisdiction where you want to practice...(it's not as bad as you hear...I did it in 3 states...just prep). I have been a states attorney, private attorney and public defender in large cities. Quite satisfying yet frustrating on both sides

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Steve beadle thank you for the respond as well. I appreciate you for taking your time in answering this question. I will be sure to look forward and make sure to prepare myself for the future. I would also like to know more of what you do!