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What are some high school requirements for software engineering?

#engineering #computer-software #software

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Matt’s Answer

I did not study software engineering in high school or college, and I've made a successful career out of it. Some of my most valuable skills seem to be the ability to type and communicate, which I did learn in high school. I'd focus on those, and honing your ability to learn.

Learning a language or framework probably doesn't matter a whole lot since they'll likely change a lot before you use them professionally.

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Dinesh’s Answer

Software engineers design, develop and improve upon the computer programs we use every day, including business apps, operating systems, network control systems and social networks. Software engineers can be divided into two main classifications: Applications Software Engineers and Systems Software Engineers.

I would suggest you to focus on Math and Science.

Dinesh recommends the following next steps:

Start learning Calculus and electives like Statistics
online courses
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José’s Answer

The more courses in math and computer science you can take much better. I would recommend looking at any computer science classes your school offers and fundamentals like Calculus and electives like Statistics will be helpful.

For an integral education try to study subjects like physics, english, art, music, history, speech and a variety of electives. Also make sure you include structure and logic for computer programming, along with some programming languages and application generators.

I hope this orientation is useful to you !!!


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G. Mark’s Answer

Math and science. No surprise there. It's what you'll use when you get to college to study any engineering. When I was in high school, we had no computer classes. Yes, it was that long ago. But these days, you'll likely have ample opportunity to study computers as they're everywhere. Nice thing is that you don't really have to understand computers to use them anymore, but the nicest thing is that having them makes understanding them so very tempting. If I were you, I'd also take advantage of the tons of on-line tutorials available, many of them not only very educational but fun to watch. Look into Linux, Unix, C, C++, Python... And here's a tip -- look over job listings on the web in places like Linkedin, Monster, etc.. This will give you an idea of where the hot areas are. And pay attention to Artificial Intelligence, specifically Machine Learning and all the open-source (free) software available. I'd be very surprised if you didn't find yourself hooked.

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Dan’s Answer

I personally did not start studying computer science until my second year of college and didn't know anything about it before then and now I am a software engineer. That being said, it seems that more and more high schoolers are learning computer science each year and it's never too early to get started if you're interested. Like others have mentioned, math and science classes are obviously helpful and it's good to work on problem solving skills. As for the actually learning to code, if your high school does not offer any courses, there are many online tutorials that help teach you a new programming language. In my opinion, I would start with one of the most common languages (c++, java or python) and just focus on that one language in the beginning. Once you learn one language and computer science basics, it is easier to transfer the skills to a new language. One other thing I'd like to point out is to make sure your studies are balanced and not all just computer science. It is valuable to have "soft" skills as well and a well-rounded education is more important earlier in your life than getting very focused and technical.

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