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Is it hard to have a boss?

Hi my name is Diego and I'm a freshman. I want to know if it's hard to have a boss. Do you have to do whatever they say, and is it hard to do things you don't agree with? I don't really like doing everything my teachers always say all the time, but I do it anyway because I want good grades. And I never really see anyone liking their boss in TV or Movies. #jobs #working #boss

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David’s Answer

Diego, I think what Ruchika said is accurate. To add on, I will say your attitude towards having a boss goes a long way toward determining how well your relationship and work enjoyment goes. Some bosses end up being good friends and some bosses you never want to see again! But they are in charge, and doing what they ask of you is often critical to your job and your success. Especially when you're starting out, you want to be seen as a good employee and a team player, as well as be able to prove your value to your company.


You want to do your best and shine, but there are some bosses out there who will not support that (especially if maybe you know more about something than your boss). On the other hand, there are great bosses out there who love it when their workers get to shine and stand out. They take pride in developing talent for the company. I think it's very similar to what you're talking about when you mention following what your teachers say - there is a purpose to what they're doing and why you're doing it. As you become an adult, however, in the work force, you will have more opportunities to challenge the status quo and state what you believe - which may contradict what bosses say. It's important to do this carefully and politely. It's all in how you frame things.

Thank you comment icon Thank you Mr. W. I know that sometimes I need to have a better attitude. I dont get into trouble or anything but I need more patience. I'll try to do better. Diego
Thank you comment icon Diego, you're welcome! It's hard at first - and something that some people never get completely used to. :) David W
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Erin’s Answer

Hey Diego - great question.


I definitely agree with the advice above and would add this: it's helpful as you enter the workforce to realize that it's your job to "manage" your boss as much as it's your boss' job to manage you. By that, I mean, you will do best if you don't wait for your boss to tell you exactly what to do and how to do it, but rather take initiative and communicate what you need from him or her to be the best you can be in the job.


If you have an open line of communication and offer feedback in the right way (respectfully and while proving yourself to be a rockstar at getting your work done!), you will impress your boss and develop a working relationship with him or her that enables you to be in more control. In that way, it can be a different and potentially more "adult" relationship than you may have with your teachers.

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Ruchika’s Answer

What kind of a boss you will get is the most ambiguous part of any job. While there are stereotypes portrayed in movies and television series, in real life it majorly depends on the kind of person your boss is and, of course, the kind of employee you prove to be.
You will always have to start at the basics-- be at your best behavior and the rest will follow.
You can be the best judge of character by the way you see your boss behave in times of crisis and follow suit.
Also, when you start a new job, do not go by what your colleagues say about your boss. Make sure you form your own judgements!
While it is very important to have a good boss, one who is interested in your growth and is willing to guide you, you will always have one who is just out there to make your life miserable.


It is not important to follow everything they say -- except instructions-- that you follow to the T. But you should be outspoken enough to tell your boss what you think is wrong and propose the right way to do it, according to you. However, check your facts before you do that and be open to criticism. A healthy argument is good for all!


And, they say, it is important to be guided by all kinds of people for success!

Thank you comment icon Okay thank you very much. I'll try. Diego
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Mia’s Answer

Hi Diego
It is not hard working for a boss provided they have great communication and leadership skills. A great boss should aspire you to 1. be part of a team and 2. know the vision, mission and direction the company is going. Once you start working learn what is expected of you and your boss leadership style. No boss should demean you, bully you or make you feel less than. All good leader will make you want to give the best that you have to offer.


Hope this helps.

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Phi’s Answer

Having a boss is not a bad thing. You may or may not be friends with your boss but I think it is more often than not that you can be "friendly" with your boss. It all depends on who your boss is and what he/she expects from you. Some are more formal and some are more casual (just like teachers) but if you can find a way to gage this early on and find some common ground, it will make your life easier. I personally like having a boss and would prefer not to be someone else's boss. I do better taking direction from someone else. But that's just me.

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Geoffrey’s Answer

Hi Diego,


Great question!


If you're worried about having a boss (don't worry - it really isn't anything to get too nervous about), I might recommend that you consider becoming an entrepreneur and starting your own business...that way you can be your own boss : )


Good luck to you!


Hope that helps,


Geoff

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Cassandra’s Answer

In addition to the great advice already shared, you should know that the culture of the company you work for makes a big difference. You can get a good sense for the culture by talking to people who already work there. You can ask them questions to find out what they do if they disagree with their manager. At some companies, there's a mentality that "the boss is always right." In other companies, they feel that good ideas can come from anywhere and therefore the managers encourage their employees to respectfully ask questions and share their opinions--especially if the employee's opinion is different from the manager's.

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Marie’s Answer

Hi Diego,


I'm glad you're looking at the big picture, realizing getting good grades is your goal. Just like school, your job and company have their goals too, the difference is when looking for a job you can select whether you want to work for a company who's values match yours. Anytime you are looking for a job, check out their homepage. Most companies will have something that talks about their culture. Places that value their employees and their contributions sounds like a look place to view. There are so many fun, innovative companies out there, and by getting familiar with what is out there, you'll be able to focus on the type of environment you want to be in.


There are good and bad in everything, including bosses. What I consider a good boss may be different than someoneelse's perception, you need to define what a good boss means to you. It could mean starting your own business and being your own boss and being the kind of boss to others that you would want for yourself.


To me a good boss, is a good leader. They help their employees to be the best they can be so that as a team you all can meet your companies goals (objectives).

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M’s Answer

Hi Diego! This is a great question. I can see why you may think that having a boss might be scary, but it truly is not. For my past and current job, my managers have been exceptional. They are always checking in and take the time out to appreciate my work. Essentially they are a big factor that contribute to having a healthy work environment. However, if you do not feel welcomed and respected at work and have made your manager aware of these situations and nothing has changed, I would think that maybe it would be time to start applying to new jobs, because the people you work with truly impact your work experience. Hope this helped answer your question!
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Selvin’s Answer

There have been some really great responses to your question. The only thing I can add is to be self reflective. The entertainment industry didn't invent the concept of having differences with an authority figure in general however, in a professional environment, you have partial control in the sense that if you devote as much energy in producing good work as you desire to have a good relationship with a superior, you'll find it difficult to end up in a role that you are unhappy with. Meaning that making yourself an asset and operating as if the business were yours to maintain no matter how minimally impactful your responsibilities may be at first, you are very likely to acquire the business acumen and resume that would produce opportunities to become the authority figure or possibly run your own business. Easier said than done but focusing on yourself and knowing your worth, would make it difficult for any boss to not feel compelled to reciprocate the attitude and result in the best chance at having a symbiotic working relationship.
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