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How do deal with living in a dorm

Theres a 25% chance ill have to study out of town, how do i get a dorm #college #studying-tips #college-bound #help


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Georgi’s Answer

This will be your first experience living without your family and being fully independent. Treat is as an adventure and make as many friends and memories as possible. The not ideal and noisy living conditions will be a great part of your life that you are likely to fondly remember a few years from now.

Enjoy it!

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Mireya’s Answer

Living in the dorms was one of the best decisions I made when going to college. Being on campus exposes you to much more opportunities and events to network that you would not get living at home. I would recommend trying dorms freshman year to help you get to know your peers and organizations available on campus. Living in the dorms also helped me focus on school, I could walk back after class and immediately begin my assignments or take a nap, something I missed once I moved out. A few challenges I faced was a messy roommate and not being able to cook for myself, but overall I am happy I experienced the dorms freshman year.

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Sheila’s Answer

Hi Raquel:

Honestly, I personally did NOT like living in a dorm my freshman year. I am not an only child and had to share a bedroom with my sisters growing up. Here are some things I recommend to deal with living in a dorm based on my experience.

• DECORATE YOUR ROOM - - I decorated my room by bringing some stuff animals, pictures of family and friends
• KEEP GOOD HOUSEKEEPING - - Untidiness is not acceptable
• PROTECT YOUR THINGS - - This is a big one for me. Before going to college I got a "large toolbox and lock" to store important documents, valuables, etc. I'm glad I did this because I worked a full-time job and participated in extra curricular activities. I was often away from my room for long periods of time. I shared a room with one roommate who often had many friends stopping over
• GET USED TO NOISE - - If you're not used to noisy surroundings I recommend wearing earplugs
• FIND YOUR QUIET SPACE - - Find a quiet space you could retreat to
• GET TO KNOW YOUR RA (RESIDENT ASSISTANT) - - Getting to know your RA is beneficial because they are there to support you when you have questions, issues, concerns, etc. that may come up and you are not sure how to handle the situation

You've received some great comments from others; I recommend that you make the most out of your college experience. Best of luck to you!

~ Sheila

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Bella’s Answer

There's nothing like living on campus and getting hands on experience of the social environments around you but it will be an adjustment. To make it a smooth one, here are a few recommendations based on my own experience:

- Practice patience and grace, this a good tool in general when interacting with people but definitely a helpful muscle to build when sharing a space
- Make your space feel as homey as possible: grab candles, your favorite photos, fun decor, string lights
- Protect your valuables at all times
- Find some hidden spots on campus that you can enjoy when you need a break from the dorm
- Attend events hosted by Resident Assistants, these were always a blast and they typically have free food. Plus you're able to meet new people in the process.

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Alexis’s Answer

I'm not going to lie to you, I HATED living in a dorm my freshman year. But keep in mind, I'm a only child, had my own bedroom and bathroom so having to share my personal space with a stranger and share a bathroom with 100 plus girls was very overwhelming for me. The one thing I wish I could do differently is possibly have lived with someone I knew. My best friend from high school was suppose to be my roommate, but last minute she decided she was going to stay at home and not go to school. So because it was so late in the game I got stuck living with a random girl, that I was not friends with, and had nothing in common with. On the bright side, she did end up leaving in October so for the rest of the school year I had the dorm to myself and then sophomore year I did get a apartment.

Everyone does need to experience dorm life though. For me, it helped me break out of my shell. I think all in-coming freshman should live in a dorm room... But with that being said in today's new 'normal' I'm not sure if you will get to experience this or not.

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Kaela’s Answer

Hello Raquel,

Remember it is a temporary situation and time frame of normally only 4 semesters. Even if you do not "click" with your roommate it is only for a short time. See it as a location to sleep and possibly study but focus on finding relationships, friends and places to hang out outside of the 14x10 ft room.

Thanks!

Kaela


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KB’s Answer

Others have answered how to deal with living in a dorm, so I'm going to hit your second question. Getting a dorm is simple. Most colleges will have dorm applications on their websites. If not, you can call their office and request to speak with housing. Have an idea of what you want and what your budget is, and pay attention to your receipt. One time, a mistake caused me to be up-charged for a single person room when I was sharing with a roommate - glad I caught that!

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Daniel’s Answer

Hi Raquel,

As a freshman I remember how stressful it can feel selecting the college you want to attend and rooming in an unknown space. The best advice I can give is to try to make it feel like home for the semesters. I recommend looking on Facebook for college group chats where you can talk to other upcoming students and possibly find a roommate. I'd also look at opportunities your college may offer because some colleges offer programs that match you with people with common interests or majors. Just remember home will always be there when you get back, but this will be your college experience that you won't regret having.

Good Luck,
Dan

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Mackenzi’s Answer

Hey Raquel,

Dorms are so fun to live in. Everyone else has covered how to deal with living in a dorm, but if you are struggling to find a roommate, I would suggest joining the Facebook group for your class. I found my roommate by joining the Facebook group for incoming students in my class and reading through the posts from people looking for roommates. If there aren't any recent ones, I would suggest writing a blurb about yourself and posting it on the page.

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John’s Answer

When I went away to college it was the first time I was ever really living on my own. I was nervous going away, but looking back on it, it was one of the best decisions I made. I met great people and became active on campus. I really enjoyed everything the school offered and I made friends for life. I would say, embrace the opportunity and make the most of your time at school. Good luck to you.

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Prentice’s Answer

- Make friends. It seems to be an easy and fun thing to do
- Eat well. Continuing to eat nutritious food is important for your health and well-being, as well as helping you sustain the energy needed to keep concentrating in classes
- Learn to live with noise. Realize now that your neighbors are probably not going to be as quiet as you’d like them to be 90 percent of the time.

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Keri’s Answer

The best thing is to make your small space belong to you, so you are the most comfortable there. Also, make connections with the kids around you. You are most likely all going through this for the first time, so use that as a bonding experience.


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