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why did you decide to become a software engineer?

#computers #technology #computer-software #engineer #software

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Zhu’s Answer

The most important factor is, I believe, INTEREST.
I'm interested in and good to the abstract logic things from my childhood. The output of that feature is that I'm extremely enjoying in my programing works. When doing it I will unstoppably focus on the work and feel so great about what I created. I believe that's the biggest reason that I choose Software Engineer as my position.
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Nick’s Answer

I entered college wanting to major in political science or economics. I honestly thought STEM classes were pretty boring in high school and had no plans on ever doing anything in that field. I wanted to go into finance or consulting, but I did an internship after my sophomore year in finance and didn't really enjoy the suited-up business culture and having to work long hours.

I asked myself what I wanted in a career and came to the conclusion that at the end of the day, work mostly came down to a paycheck for me. Sure, there were some things that I would HATE to do for work (those I would never do), but most jobs would ultimately be me doing work I didn't really care about for a large organization whose primary purpose is to generate money for stockholders.

After some career research, I found that software engineers make a high salary and work very reasonable hours. Luckily, I had taken an intro CS class my sophomore year with friends and I was a statistics major, so I could apply to data science internships. I leveraged my internship into a full-time offer as a software engineer, and I'm really happy with my career decision! If you find coding to be something you're capable of doing and something that doesn't drive you crazy, I think most people would say software engineer is a great job to have.
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Ricky’s Answer

My path to software engineering was a winding road.

My parents got our first computer when I was in elementary school. I was immediately hooked because I could play games on it (Zork was my favorite). I remember the day we got the internet for the first time, my entire family crowded around our computer for the occasion. It was the days of dial-up, we waited through the sound of the connection and then tried to join a chat room. It was so slow that it took us around 10 minutes to join one. My dad quickly declared that this whole internet thing was a "giant waste of money" and canceled our account.

It was another year or two before I could convince him to try again. During that period, I don't remember how, I got introduced to computer programming. Once we got connected again I built a small game using VisualBasic and e-mailed it to all my friends. I was hooked. I took AP Comp Sci in high school and spent a lot of my free time teaching myself more about code.

In college, I oscillated between Computer Science and Political science. Sometimes switching my major between each semester. I thought that writing code as a job meant sitting in a cubical all day, and that didn't excite me. Ultimately I decided to drop out and pursue my dream of being a rockstar.

Of course, here I am, so clearly that didn't work out :) After my time as a musician ended, I realized that throughout all of my personal journeys, code was a constant in my life. I was always trying to build things that would help accelerate my other passions. Thankfully my girlfriend at the time (now wife) helped me realize that coding could be a career, and encouraged me to pursue it. I couldn't be happier.


Ricky recommends the following next steps:

Spend time writing code, https://www.codecademy.com/ is a great place to start
If you enjoy that, pick a project you want to try building. Make it something fun. Perhaps a game or something that solves a personal problem for you.
Find a community of developers (http://dev.to is a great one), share with them what you're learning and ask about what they're working on
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Dimitrios’s Answer

Video games!

I was fascinated by video games as I was growing up. I still am! I think they are a form of art. Games combine several forms of art: visuals, writing, music all come together to create worlds that players can explore and learn so much.

It soon became apparent to me that I did not just want to play games but I wanted to create games too! I asked how I could get to do so and I was advised to study computer science.

Fast forward a couple dozen years later and here I am working as a software engineer. Did I end up creating games? I did not. During my studies I discovered I enjoyed writing and designing software no matter what the application is. Well, that is not entirely true, I still want to be interested in the problem the application tries to solve but it doesn't have to be games.

Working as part of a software team can be a gratifying experience. You get to solve interesting problems every day, together with other people that are equally passionate with you! I can't emphasize enough that software development is, above all, a team effort. Many people imagine writing software as a very lonely job. But in reality, software teams thrive through communication. We talk to each other all the time discussing problems, reviewing each other's code, suggesting improvements, teaching and learning new things.

I wasn't aware of all these back when I decided to study computer science. But I would definitely make the same call now that I am.
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Stephanie’s Answer

When I went to college, I wanted to double major in physics and aerospace engineering. I loved physics in high school and my aunt had worked for NASA; she advised that I choose these majors if I ever wanted to be considered. One year in, I was miserable. I kept telling myself it would get better after college once I was in the field, but I talked to my aunt about it and she told me to expect a similar life outside of college. Although I love science and technology, I also love having a life. My advisor at college suggested looking into computer science because it had the same core courses I had already done, and this way I could still graduate in four years. I honestly knew very little about computer science at the time but decided to look into it. I talked with professors in the program who told me I should excel with my background, saw the ample job opportunities online, and researched the work-life balance. The last one really did it for me. Although it varies by company, many tech companies now lean towards a casual workplace and have the attitude of "work when you want, as long as you get your work done". This sold me. I loved the idea of having a STEM career and the ability to continue learning as I worked while still having the flexibility to do other things I enjoy. I added Java 1001 to my schedule the next semester and after just a few weeks in this class, I knew it was time to switch. Writing code just felt like following instructions and it was so satisfying to build something tangible in a short amount of time. At this point, switching to a computer science major was the obvious choice. Once I got to my software engineering classes, the workload was large enough to be unbearable if it had still been physics work. But with software engineering, even with all of the hours I had to put in to finish my projects, I always felt capable and like I could figure it out. I thought it was fun to try to make my code perfect. Because I had fun writing code and helping others understand their own code, I quickly became the top performer in my class. Basically, I decided on a software engineering career because coding doesn't really feel like work to me. I was able to find a match with a company by being honest about my priorities - although I love coding and will always put in time to make my code better, I want to be able to give time to my family and other hobbies. I now work on a team where I get challenging work but a flexible work schedule. I remember feeling so uneasy about the future when I was a phsyics/AE major, but it feels like everything worked itself out once I listened to other peoples' advice and was honest with myself about what I wanted out of my career.

Stephanie recommends the following next steps:

Really think about how you picture both your work and personal life - write it down if you need to
Research positions related to software engineering or any career you look into. Talk with people in these positions if you can. Compare what you find to how you picture your future.
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Ariane’s Answer

I've been working in the IT industry for the past 19 years now and I've moved from different areas between software development, systems analysis, project/people management, cybersecurity and now, test engineering.

Was being a software engineer my first choice ? The answer is no. However when I was studying in the university the computer science field is mostly dominated by men and not a lot of students were able to graduate. The opportunities are pretty good and there's less competition after you graduate. So I decided to take up the challenge. I'd say it wasn't an easy ride. I literally put extra effort and hard work in my studies. I was lucky to pass and graduate and everything paid off in the end.

Because there are so many areas to explore and learn within the IT field, you can have the flexibility to move and experience different job opportunities.
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Rahul’s Answer

I guess I didn't choose software field rather it chose me.. just kidding.
I wanted to be a swimmer but my parents didn't allow me to pursue my carrier towards saying it can be your hobby but not profession specially when you are jacked up with very less options in your country.
There was a time when my sister was gifted a new computer by my parents during the time of internet and booming IT sectors.
She used to learn some good programming stuff on that computer and I used to play games being a gaming freak at that time. But that gradually helped me develop my interest in languages too.
Which is when I thought to persue my carrier playing around computers and operating systems.
To talk about all the good sides I found to be true is that software industry is wide and have lot of options to be creative.
There is great demand of good programmers as well as quality software and it pays you well.
Number of software companies are increasing with time and also the number of software developers.
Many software companies provide application development solutions but important is quality assurance and customer satisfaction.
We can achieve success in this profession if we actually enjoy our work.
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Nivetha’s Answer

I always had a thing for computer programming since I was in high school. Curiosity to know how things work beyond the screen always fascinates me. I was always interested in programming and automation. I scored good grade in Maths and Computer school during my high school. which helped me to get into Computer Science and Engineering in my college. Right after my college I started my job as software engineer. Learning is never ending process in this job and the challenging tasks will keep you going all the time. Since industry is changing constantly, you will never get bored with what you do as the options are wide.
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Naomi’s Answer

I am passionate in problem solving, automation, being creative and learning new things everyday. It's what you are personally passionate about so that everyday in work will always be day to look forward to.
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karthik’s Answer

To know The Coding process and various software terminologies
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Jay’s Answer

Alejandro,

For me it was a mix of a couple of factors. First the technology space interested me because it was a constantly evolving and changing space. It felt like every month there were new things to learn and explore. Second, it gave me a great chance to help people. This is something that may be a little harder to imagine, but this industry is ultimately focused on solving a problem that someone is having.

These two things in combination has made the role extremely rewarding for me.

Best of luck
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Ramesh’s Answer

Anyone who decides mostly because of the area of interest and domain they are very good at based on their academics accomplishments. Also some small percentage time some folks they don't have a choice or not sure but they will experiment. Of course lot of us come with area of interest and what pays more also plays an important role.

I am answering this question mostly generic way and i hope you get my point of view.
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Hector’s Answer

I believe I became a software engineer when i received my masters in it. And I was able to adapt to new tools and processes and I was able to help people quicker.
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Shawn’s Answer

I believe it's due to interest.
When I built something using scripting or programming language, I feel I accomplished something which I or other ppl will benefit it from.
Also in computer science, things keep changing. You are not repeating yourself . The result of your work and code you wrote are different every day.
With more and more jobs can be automated or moving to online, it's a skill which can keep you up-to-date with others.
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Hector’s Answer

When I was still in college, I was just learning to write programs and I was majoring in computer science. I decided to go into software engineering as a post-graduate degree because I found the concentration as very challenging in school and in my job. I guess I gradually enjoyed it more and more when I found out there was many concentrations under software engineering that I can learn on my job.
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Dina’s Answer

Software is an area where you can take real business problems and find technology to solve them. Given the smart everything now with home, cars and now the enterprise, its an exciting time to be in technology to help the world run better. Its been a great industry to be a part of as it continues to evolve and becomes smarter.
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karthik’s Answer

Its really good and Programming concepts make's computer science more interesting
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