2 answers

What are employers in the educational/psychology field looking for in this career?

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2 answers

Kayla’s Answer

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Hi Diana,

Usually employers in this field are looking for relevant education and experience. The education will depend on what route you want to take, however the general consensus leans towards first earning a Bachelor's degree.

Say you want to go into counseling, either educational or psychological, you will need to earn a Master's degree and possibly a Ph.D along with a credential program tailored to your discipline. If you are looking at a specific job posting, make sure you meet the basic requirements before applying or can meet them at some point. Employers want assurance that you can deliver on the job, this assurance being your educational pursuits and accumulated experience.

Experience is the other side of the coin. While pursuing your degrees, build up your resume with campus jobs, internships, even volunteer opportunities to show employers your range of expertise. For example, I worked in transfer student advising/education during undergrad, but volunteered for Admissions, Associated Students, and studied abroad! All of those experiences built my resume exponentially. The right employer will value your efforts and allow you to apply yourself.

Good luck with your endeavors!
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Dr. Ray’s Answer

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Dear Diana,

I'm not sure what you mean by the"educational/psychology field" but will try to answer your question. The obvious response is that employers want you to know something about psychology, especially how people learn, what motivates them to act in different situations, what influences their personality, etc. They would also expect you to know something about your specific area of interest, e.g. educational psychology for teachers, psychological disorders for clinical psychologists (like me), criminal justice for probation officers, to name only a few. You are probably looking at a bachelor's degree to work in any of these fields, and many will require a master's or PhD degree. As you narrow your interests you should be able to find more detailed information about these topics.

This is another obvious point, but good grades in high school, good recommendations from your teaches and participation in meaningful activities, such as volunteering, all help you look attractive to employers.

I wish you the best in your career pursuits.

Ray Finn, Ph.D.
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