5 answers

What is the best method when tending to patients with aggresive attitude?

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100% of 4 Pros
Updated Viewed 135 times
4
100% of 4 Pros

5 answers

Rachel’s Answer

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If the patient is an aggressive male and I fear for my safety, I always have a chaperone in the room. If the patient or family member is just acting aggressive because they are anxious and scared about the diagnosis, I sit down, spend more time with them. I let them know that I will continue to treat them and do whatever I can to help, despite the potentially dismal prognosis.
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otito’s Answer

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As a healthcare worker, it is common to meet "aggressive" patients from different backgrounds. However, it is important to understand that a difference in culture or environment might make one interpret a patient's attitude as aggressive. Nevertheless, dealing with patients requires patience, compassion, and evaluation. Having compassion and patience would give you the calmness to assist the patient while improving the nurse-patient relationship. As an individual, I believe that mindfully viewing patients as your family reduces any tension that a situation presents. Also, you should evaluate the situation of the patient because physiological factors contribute to the attitude of a patient. Check if there have been any changes in the patient's vitals and calmly ask the patient open-ended questions to understand the cause of aggression.
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Heather’s Answer

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This is dependent on where you work. As an RN that has worked in medical-surgical and psychiatric the first step in trying to defuse the situation with a calm voice and body language and sometimes knowing when to be firm on a decision or reconsider a decision. Identifying the trigger, I have had cases were it was a specific person and the person had to be removed from that area for the staff to calm the patient down. But all aspects have to be considered, medication, drug-induced, psychiatric, etc before proper care can be fully effective by therapeutic communication or medication as the last resort.

But I will always state never show fear or emotion in these instances; calm and relaxed manner even if you feel otherwise is always best when in such situations.
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Gigi’s Answer

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Remain calm! Lower your voice, don't try to over talk them or get louder. Make sure they don't corner you in a room. Figure out what has triggered them (meds,food,pain?). Make them feel like they are your priority. Lastly, safety for them and you...

We all have had these type of patient's, it gets easier with each encounter.
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Nirva’s Answer

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As we go by the saying that eye for an eye makes the whole nation blind, we should apply the same things in our medical culture. With aggressive patients, we must be careful with what we say in front of them as we cannot hurt their feeling as the customer is the god. Sometimes, medicines have a harsh effect on patients and that might also cause the mood swings.
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