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On your resume, how should you tailor your objective statement when applying to jobs in different subjects?


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Kim’s Answer

Olivia,

This is easy! Don't use an objective statement! Objective statements are very "old school." I usually make the first section of the resume a "skills and qualifications." It is the best of the best. Write it LAST, after you have written the resume, so you know what it is you need to highlight in that section. Below that would be Experience, followed by Education. You can have separate sections for Volunteer Experience, or, incorporate it into the experience section. The absolute best resume template I have ever seen is Gotresumebuilder.com. It gives you total flexibility on naming and arranging the section headings, adding or deleting sections, etc., and gives you suggestions as you go. Lets you change between 6 different layouts, fonts, etc. And save it Word/PDF. Free with a library card or student ID.

When applying for different types of positions, you need to have more than one resume! Lucky we now have computers! So, for example, if someone wants a job either in teaching or sales, they would have two master resumes - one tailored for each field. Beyond that, when they are applying to a particular position, they would tweak the resume even further, making it match up to the job description.

I personally like writing cover letters. It is an art, and not everyone does it. A cover letter is a way of adding a personal touch to the resume. If you want more info on that, let me know!

Kim

So much this! Excellent answer! Jacob Affinito

This is awesome. I can not advice anymore under this thread since you touched every facets of the question. I totally agree with you since I restructure my CV to match the required job functions if I have the experience. Thanks Kim! Chinonso Offie

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Bruce’s Answer

Hi Olivia,

Instead of an Objective section at the top of your resume (the most valuable piece of real estate on your resume), I strongly encourage you to consider a Summary instead. While an objective focuses on your own aspirations, a summary provides valuable information to the prospective hiring organization in terms of what your candidacy brings to them. It's all about what's in it for your audience, not what's in it for you.

An effective summary will present a high-level synopsis on your specialty, what are you known for, what are you sought out for, and how are you differentiated from others in your field. This can include tangibles, such as specific skills, capabilities, or prior accomplishments. It can also include intangibles, such as your sense of drive, curiosity, coachability, collaboration skills, vision, problem-solving abilities, etc.

The summary at the top of your resume sets the stage for the reader. It provides vital framing of who you are and what you bring to the table, better enabling hiring managers to comprehend and put into context the rest of your resume. You can tweak the summary for each position you apply to by emphasizing abilities that match up to the job description and its associated responsibilities.

Let me know if you have any questions about how to write a compelling summary. I'm happy to help!

Bruce

Bruce recommends the following next steps:

Make a list of all the attributes that best describe you, your specialization, and how you're differentiated.
Incorporate some of the most compelling attributes in your summary, giving emphasis and priority to the ones that relate to the job description.
Review your summary with someone you trust, who knows your skills and abilities, to see if your summary rings true to them.
Adapt the summary to a more conversational tone and try using as the basis for an elevator pitch in networking opportunities.

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Nina’s Answer

You do not necessarily need an objective statement for a resume; I think that "you" statements can be great, such as "Data driven educator determined to bridge the home, school and community," or "Humor + Hard work = Success!" You may need several resumes, one for each different type of job; for example, when applying for data coaching jobs, I highlighted my school test coordination and data computer skills, but for a classroom teaching job I highlighted my instructional and lesson planning skills. Many places prefer a one page resume, so working with someone on this can be very helpful to keep it short and sweet; there are numerous templates online depending on what you are trying to accomplish. Your name in bold at the top looks good. Also, a slightly different colored paper (not bright, but gray or cream) can make yours stand out. A strong, brief cover letter is also important - professional but friendly. If you need more specifics, happy to answer any additional questions you may have! Good luck to you!!

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Angela’s Answer

Typically, I refrain from using objective statements when I create my own or other people's resumes. Instead, I tailor the RESUME to meet the specific job.

At times, instead of creating a new resume or revamping a current one, I may use "summary of qualifications" section, and create it by pulling wording from the job description.

Overall, I think that the key is to make your resume mirror the job description as much as possible whether that be through the structure of the resume itself or by including a summary that demonstrates how your experiences and skills match the position details.

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Hanleigh’s Answer

I personally would recommend not using an objective. Using an objective is a bit outdated. Taking your objective would also give you more space to elaborate on your relevant skills, accomplishments, and experiences. Essentially all objectives have the same message, which is to state that you want a job in your field. That does not need to be reiterated. An opportunity for you to elaborate more your experience and your interest would be a cover letter.

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Kiah’s Answer

Hi Olivia, in addition to the other advice, I want to point out that a website called Ask a Manager has great career advice, including information on resumes: https://www.askamanager.org/category/resumes

Kiah recommends the following next steps:

Explore resume topic (and rest of website) Ask A Manager: https://www.askamanager.org/category/resumes

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Fiona’s Answer

You should think about which of your key work experiences, skills, education, extra curricular activities or personality traits are most relevant for that particular job. This can be one or two sentences – sharp and succinct is always best.

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Michelle’s Answer

Personally, I do not use an objective statement in my resume. Everyone's objective always reads the same - they want a job! Use the rest of your resume to demonstrate how you can add value to a company and save the space!

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Yvette’s Answer

I would not recommend an objective but if you need a space filler you can put a 3-5 sentenced summary section. This video can help you as well:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=JuVYWUo2meE

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Sonya’s Answer

If possible tailor your resume to the specific job you are applying for then your Summary statement can reflect your strong interest in becoming a valuable employee of that company/in that field. If not and you are sending out resumes to several companies then a general summary statement is good, again showcasing that you are looking for a position where you would be a valuable employee to the company. Think in terms of "what's in it for the company, and what's in it for you" showing both in our summary statement.

Review your skills and qualifications and if you don't have all the skills listed on the qualifications then list any related skills you may have.

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Ash’s Answer

You can definitely have a summary that describes your skills, strengths, and experience in a sentence at the very top.

Based on the roles you are applying for, you can group certain applications based on the Role and tailor your resume to the role. The descriptions per job can be achievements or examples of when you used skills that are vital for the role. Tailoring the roles, rather than the objective, will be a good way to show the recruiter see what you have achieved!

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