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Are there any University Programs which combine both Finance and Computing? How Do they Work?

This is one question that has been lingering in the back of my mind for a very long time. I have developed a pretty solid foundation in finance and accounting, as well as developed a passion for stem and computing through hobbies and extracurriculars. I have found this one program at the University of Waterloo called "Computing and Financial Management". I will definitely look more in-depth, but I figured that having professional input would give me a more refined approach to explore this field. #accounting #finance #computing #technology #business #college #computer-science


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Lauren’s Answer

This is a wonderful skill set to have! If you can speak IT as well as finance/accounting, you will be invaluable to companies.

Your best bet is to research your school's opportunities but, things that I've heard of that might fit your interests are data analytics programs. You may also consider an undergraduate program in any of these areas and a 1 year masters in the other. Many schools will allow you to take masters courses early while you are working through the last sections of your undergraduate program.

Thank you for your answer! I've actually talked to someone who's taken some pretty tough courses pertaining to data analytics and business. It seemed interesting but I'm not sure if I just want to work diligently to gain acceptance into a software engineering program, and then in the process try to gain co-ops at Bloomberg perse, rather than just committing to a career as a data analyst. I'll definitely look into it though. All the best! Aun M.

You may want to looking to specific areas such as "quantitative finance" or "financial mathematics", including rankings, reviews and outcomes. Fred Christensen

Thank you, Fred. I'll look into it! Aun M.

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Amanda (Mandy)’s Answer

You might want to start looking at FINTECH majors which is in the BA of Science in Business Administration degree.

An article outlining more of this can be found here, from Creighton University: https://business.creighton.edu/fintech

Entry Level positions include:
-Financial Analyst
-Investment Analyst
-Investment Banking Analyst
-Product Manager
-Data Analyst
-App Developer
-Data Specialist
-Innovation Analyst

Another article outlining FinTech can be found here: https://www.businessstudent.com/degrees/financial-technology-degree/

Thanks for the answer, Amanda! I might look into it, but at this point, I might put all my eggs in one basket and aim for either computer or software engineering. I believe I don't have much time to decide, so one of these two careers would be fine. I'm definitely also asking these questions so I have the appropriate extracurriculars to show universities that I'm thoroughly involved. All the best! Aun M.

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Fabio’s Answer

Hello Aun,

With an understanding of both tech and finance, you'll surely set yourself up for great success. I've spent three years doing accounting for a large hedge fund in NYC and have found that our engineers and developers were all well versed in finance lingo. If you're able to code, you'll have an additional layer of quantitative skills that many employers now seek.

My alma mater (NYU Stern) recently began offering a one-year tech MBA program which is something you can look into for the future. I think it provides great ROI as it's only one year and you're still able to recruit for full-time offers with the companies that come to campus in the fall.

Hope this helps. Best of luck with the process!

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Chuck’s Answer

Macroeconomics and microeconomics usually have a component of computing and finance built in to the coursework and or research projects. The software is an example of the in practice question you have here. I believe Swim is used on wallstreet, currently.

Thank you for your answer! That's definitely a very interesting response, as I'm not well immersed in the finance and still do not know much about it. What really intrigues me is the "Computing and Financial Management" program at Waterloo I listed above, as it seems like a good hybrid of both professions. I will definitely look into macroeconomics and microeconomics though, mainly because I'm probably taking it in grade 12 (which isn't really that far). All the best! Aun M.

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Krishna’s Answer

Definitely! I obtained a Bachelor's of Science in Business Administration with concentrations in Finance and Management Information Systems at Boston University. The combination of the two majors not only overlap but truly work well together if you want to opt in for a career in fintech. Through Management Information Systems, I learned how to code, work on developmental projects through SCRUM, and explore databases in SQL. This in combination with my Finance background taught me how to use my technical skill set to evaluate financial and economic data. I highly recommend MIS if that is what you are passionate about. It is incredible relevant and useful nowadays.

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Haylie’s Answer

Most business school these days have an emphasis on Information Technology. If you don't have your Bachelor's Degree yet, it might be worth looking into Business schools that offer both Finance and Information Systems as focuses. If you already have your Bachelor's Degree, you can consider 1 year MBA programs with a similar focus.

More and more finance and accounting firms are focused on data analysis, visualization and automation so you're definitely on a great track here.

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Fabio’s Answer

Hello Aun,

With an understanding of both tech and finance, you'll surely set yourself up for great success. I've spent three years doing accounting for a large hedge fund in NYC and have found that our engineers and developers were all well versed in finance lingo. If you're able to code, you'll have an additional layer of quantitative skills that many employers now seek.

My alma mater (NYU Stern) recently began offering a one-year tech MBA program which is something you can look into for the future. I think it provides great ROI as it's only one year and you're still able to recruit for full-time offers with the companies that come to campus in the fall.

Hope this helps. Best of luck with the process!

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