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What careers blend my passion for business and my love for sports ?

I am a grade 11 student. I am an actor with leading and supporting roles on my resume. I’ve done theatre, short film and television series. I love basketball and the raptors. I’m very interested in business and investments. #consulting #sports-management #business #acting


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Syed’s Answer

Hi Nathan,

You have a wide variety of interests! Here’s some jobs that are at the intersection of business and sports:

1. Agent for a Player: The folks usually have law degrees. They negotiate contracts, endorsements, and appearances for their players. They get a cut of the deal in return. Big players are Creative Artists Agency and Klutch Sports Group

2. Marketing or Finance roles at a Sports-Oriented consumer brand: Running financials or marketing products at companies like Gatorade (PepsiCo), Powerade (Coca Cola), Body Armor, Spalding

3. Working for a sports franchise: Franchises are fully running businesses and provide all kinds of jobs. You can work on the ticket selling team and sell box seats to big companies in the area. You can make big merchandising decisions. You can do analytics on the players. All types of options here

4. Working for a league office: Like the teams, the league offices themselves need all types of support from different kinds of professionals. You can work on media partnerships, branding, social media strategy, finance, etc

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Josh’s Answer

I would recommend following a lot of Sports related companies on social media. (e.g. ESPN, Fox Sports, etc.), as well as individual personalities within those companies across all catergories: (e.g. basketball, football, fantasy sports, beat writers)

Many times, internships are commented on these social media platforms, as well as the links to apply.

Job openings are also sometimes listed at the bottom of these respected websites.

This is a great way to "get your foot in the door," which can open the door to a plethora of opportunities in Sports Media, Sports Business, etc.

Many of these interns end up with positions within an organization, e.g. (Erik Spolestra with the Miami Heat).

I think its great that you are interested in this field!

Best of luck!

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Ken’s Answer

I worked for the NBA for a few years while putting myself through college. Many don't realize all the behinds the scenes work that goes into sports, sporting events and team management. Every job in business that you can imagine can be pursued in the realm of sports, finance, management, sales and marketing etc. If you are passionate about sports then I would strongly suggest an internship or getting on with any organizations minor league teams and working your way.

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Lisa’s Answer

SPORTS MANAGEMENT! Behind every double play, touchdown, and penalty shot, stand the skilled management professionals that made the game possible!

Lisa recommends the following next steps:

Explore career title: Sports Manager
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Explore career title: Athletic Director
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Explore career title: Director of Operations
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Explore career title: Sports Marketer
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Explore career title: Event Coordinator
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Randee’s Answer

I actually have a degree in sports medicine and business. You could always get a degree in this with business tied into it with sports management . Even its a passion to own your own business you could use this degree for opening up a sports management/nutrition business fro athletes. Rehab facility . Also working with professional sports teams and colleges. Lots of opportunities in the sports management field and different avenues you can take if its a passion for you.

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Janice’s Answer

Well you have lots of time to decide! How about broadcasting or sports writing? Keep watching sports and study hard. You will be a great success!

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Mario’s Answer

I would pursue junior marketing roles that specialize in partnerships with sports organizations like NHL, MLB or individual sports teams.

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Aspen’s Answer

Something in sports marketing could be perfect for you! Utilizing your creativity to allow teams you are passionate about to reach wider audiences would be fulfilling and engaging. Your skill set in acting would also be beneficial in driving marketing initiatives on tv or through social media, whether that be in participating yourself or guiding others to make decisions consistent with their given brand.

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Rebecca’s Answer

In addition to what has already been recommended:
Look into majors like digital marketing, sports management, finance and/or accounting because finance and accounting jobs can be applied to the sports industry as well (ex: sports accountant), communications, PR, advertising and journalism.

I highly recommend you read this article: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonbelzer/2014/02/05/sports-industry-101-breaking-into-the-business-of-sports/#6f14580a3db9

As a way to gain experience, I also recommend reaching out to your high school's teams and athletics director, or a nearby University teams to see if there are student positions such as social media intern, marketing intern, team fundraising intern or student manager. Also, look into sports leagues and teams that feed into NHL, NBA, MLB etc. for possible internship opportunities to get your career started. As an intern, try not to be too picky regarding which sport/team it is because once you gain a little experience it will open doors to opportunities with other sports/teams.

I'm not sure these are for high school students, but here are some examples of internship opportunities to consider:
Toronto Blue Jays operations internship: https://www.peersight.com/job/rogers-communications-baseball-operations-affiliate-intern-toronto-blue-jays.amp?utm_campaign=google_jobs_apply&utm_source=google_jobs_apply&utm_medium=organic

Blue Jays fundraising internship: https://www.peersight.mx/job/rogers-communications-jays-care-foundation-fundraising-intern-in-toronto-on.amp?utm_campaign=google_jobs_apply&utm_source=google_jobs_apply&utm_medium=organic

Raptors esport summer co-op: https://greygarter.com/job/esports-co-op-summer-2020-mlse/?utm_campaign=google_jobs_apply&utm_source=google_jobs_apply&utm_medium=organic

MLSE internships: https://www.mlse.com/our-company/internship-program

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Vincent’s Answer

Hi Nathan,

Sports is usually a great way to build relationships in any field you pursue. Being a D1 college athlete was a strong speaking point for me during interviews and helped me bond with my team quickly. Many of my coworkers played/liked sports so it was an instant connection. This too can be a great way for you to build relationships and have a smooth transition into your teams. Good luck!

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Brian’s Answer

Nathan,

It's great that you've put thought in to this at a young age. While it's not the best market at the moment, the sports and entertainment field is vast and does allow for someone with a passion for sports and business to work while doing what they love.

I have worked in professional sports, and a couple years in minor league sports, for 15 years. In this time, I've learned a few things about setting ones self up for success particularly as they proceed towards a college education.

1) Sports Management Degree - I got my degree in Sports Management. While it was probably more fun than some other sort of business concentration and there were some networking opportunities provided because of it, it isn't necessary to break in to the industry. As you have an interest in business and investments, you may gear your education towards that. I've worked side by side with people that graduated with a plethora of degrees not associated with sports. Though again, I had a lot more fun getting my degree with classes built around sports so I can't say not to do it.

2) Experience - While in school, get every bit of relevant work/internship/volunteer experience that you can. It's not going to be as easy as going in to an Athletic Department Office or knocking on the door to a professional franchise and asking to help where you get a high level opportunity. These opportunities are competitive. Be willing to take on the lowly tasks. If a team has a street team or any sort of game day volunteer program, do it. Even if it isn't in the area of business that interests you, it allows you to make inroads with that organization to pursue other opportunities of interest. As you are in Toronto, if possible, look to work an event day job (when things open again) for the Raptors, Blue Jays, etc. As an interviewer, many will feel loyal to at least giving you a shot knowing that you spent time on the front lines for them at some point.

3) Jobs - While working through your education and experiences, you will have opportunities to hear from speakers, go to seminars, etc. Take time to speak with, connect, interview people representing different fields of the business. Learn their path. The path to a job will be different for everyone but hopefully it gives you an idea where you want to start out. Just remember when you are young that you have time to pivot if you get in to a role that you find doesn't best suit you.

Good luck!

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Michael’s Answer

While sports are fun to play and entertaining to watch, they are also big business at every level – yes, every level from youth recreational to professional. Depending on your particular sport of interest, the acumen of business is woven throughout.

Organized sports need fields, and the fields need a stadium. Facilities don’t get built from fan passion and excitement alone. They require funding from government, taxpayers, sponsors, etc. Someone with a strong business background to build relationships, manage finances and develop sales and marketing programs is essential to any sports organization.

Once there are established facilities, they need to be maintained and need to generate revenue as required by any business to manage expenses. The costs of paying employees, paying utilities, maintaining the fields, upgrades to the facility are just a small example of the expansive business responsibility of any sports organization.

Selling sponsorship to companies that pay money to advertise and build relationships with fans is a constantly evolving business ecosystem. Visit any sports facility big or small and you will see physical signage representing various companies and someone within the organization built a program to sell that company a sign and probably many more benefits. Companies don’t make donations to receive signage – they make investments and use a sports property as a valuable marketing tool.

People like yourself can go to school to develop skills and knowledge in business, sales and marketing with a focus on sports so that you can combine your passions and truly enjoy going to work every day.

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Brian’s Answer

Nathan,

It's great that you've put thought in to this at a young age. While it's not the best market at the moment, the sports and entertainment field is vast and does allow for someone with a passion for sports and business to work while doing what they love.

I have worked in professional sports, and a couple years in minor league sports, for 15 years. In this time, I've learned a few things about setting ones self up for success particularly as they proceed towards a college education.

1) Sports Management Degree - I got my degree in Sports Management. While it was probably more fun than some other sort of business concentration and there were some networking opportunities provided because of it, it isn't necessary to break in to the industry. As you have an interest in business and investments, you may gear your education towards that. I've worked side by side with people that graduated with a plethora of degrees not associated with sports. Though again, I had a lot more fun getting my degree with classes built around sports so I can't say not to do it.

2) Experience - While in school, get every bit of relevant work/internship/volunteer experience that you can. It's not going to be as easy as going in to an Athletic Department Office or knocking on the door to a professional franchise and asking to help where you get a high level opportunity. These opportunities are competitive. Be willing to take on the lowly tasks. If a team has a street team or any sort of game day volunteer program, do it. Even if it isn't in the area of business that interests you, it allows you to make inroads with that organization to pursue other opportunities of interest. As you are in Toronto, if possible, look to work an event day job (when things open again) for the Raptors, Blue Jays, etc. As an interviewer, many will feel loyal to at least giving you a shot knowing that you spent time on the front lines for them at some point.

3) Jobs - While working through your education and experiences, you will have opportunities to hear from speakers, go to seminars, etc. Take time to speak with, connect, interview people representing different fields of the business. Learn their path. The path to a job will be different for everyone but hopefully it gives you an idea where you want to start out. Just remember when you are young that you have time to pivot if you get in to a role that you find doesn't best suit you.

Good luck!

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Dennis’s Answer

Nathan - Sports Management is a great field and is just getting bigger - Start getting yourself adapted through Sports Management Info (whether books or websites) find the best Sports Management Colleges and go after the Degree...Internships are beneficial can open the door to ESPN, Sports Agent...You name it! It’s all up to you!

Best of Luck!

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