15 answers

How do i know what career is right for me?

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I'm in college right now, about to graduate with my associates. During my childhood I wanted to be a teacher, then as I got older I wanted to be a therapist or councilor. I just turned 20 in April and I think it's time i have a better idea of what I actually want for my future. I want to be in business because it does seem interesting, i've been to seminars and it seems like something I could do. Another reason why I choose to major in business is because, its so versatile and makes good money. Deep down i'm not sure what my calling is but I want to figure it out already so I could dedicate and focus my future into my job. #college #career #needhelp#business#therapist#engineering #psychology

Well, try to take a marketing course for 1 semester and see if you enjoy the business and maybe you can try and go from there :) hope this helps :) Mermaid O. Translate
Hi Daisy, I am a college student and my career goal is to be a psychologist, but I always struggled with my career choice just like you are! I first majored in psych because I thought I might be interested in it, and turns out I am! The road wasn't easy and I also found a love for biology as well. I looked into different branches of psych and Bio Psychology fit both of my interests. It seems like you did a lot of research for business and I think you should go with your gut and take the opportunity! You can always add a psych minor if you still are interested in a few psych classes or just take the psych classes for GE credit. Good luck with your journey, Daisy. Nicole G. Translate
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15 answers

John’s Answer

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Hi Daisy,

I believe your on the right track, earning a college degree will greatly enhance your marketability as a professional. Not only does a college degree make you more marketable, it makes you more marketable to a much greater range of career OPTIONS.

Earning a college degree – at any level – will open doors for you that would otherwise but shut. In addition to the skills and knowledge acquired by earning a degree, attending college provides professional networking opportunities inaccessible to those who don’t go to college.

Most people only consider the direct impact of a college degree on their own lives, one of the more hidden benefits of college and earning a college degree is the positive impact it can have on your family life as well, especially your children. I think, households where one or both parents have a college degree their children are more likely to earn a college degree. Earning a college degree can have a ripple effect that will influence the well-being of generations to come.

Enjoy The Journey
Thank you! I do think i'm on the right track, but then again I feel like you can be a college student and not have a lot of connections. I am close with some professors and students that can help me out, but I just have to figure out specifically what I want to do and focus on it. Overall I do believe college is a way to present yourself to society, it does show off a lot of hard work and education but these days a lot of people are requiring more experience and sometimes it's hard to get because people don't want to hire with just a degree. Daisy L. Translate
Daisy I could not of said better, you have identified some of great opportunities college provides. The chance to meet knowledgeable professors and students and develop skills you’ll take with you throughout life. Who knows your college connections may even lead to study abroad, meet industry leaders or score a great internship with your dream company. Enjoy the Journey Dasiy John Frick Translate
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Hannah’s Answer

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I'll let you in on a secret. If you told 20-year-old me that I would be working my current job in the future. I would have said you were lying. My current career wasn't even on my radar. It was an elective I took my last semester in college that got the ball rolling. You never know when inspiration will strike, but you can make yourself available to new ideas and experiences.

Also, there's no need to pressure yourself into finding a calling. Your career is a large and important part of your life, but it isn't everything. I would try to think more holistically about what makes you happy, including friends, family, extracurricular activities, etc. Ideally, you will find a career path that is stimulating, and it will give you the time (and income) to enjoy all of life. It sounds like business could fill that niche for you nicely. Try out a some classes, but don't be afraid to change your mind if you need to.
I love this! I agree that inspiration does come out of nowhere sometimes, I just dont want to get too old and not have an idea of what I want to do. Sometimes I feel like I overthink things because I feel like I have to do good in life when I should take a step back and realize all of the things that make me happy in life right now! Thank you so much I needed to hear this! Daisy L. Translate
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David’s Answer

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If you are about to graduate with your Associate degree, what major are you completing it with. If your goal is to do childhood dream is to become an teacher, then as I got older I wanted to be a therapist or councilor. And now you are or want to major in Business, you are technically jumping around and have an unclear what you really want to do. My question for you is are you in for the money where in the future it can be a love or hate thing or you are in it for your dream and passion and where you may not make a lot of money but enjoy what you are doing. You have to decide on that part first before you keep on continue for your education towards a high degree. Other things, you can do is combining both together like double major or a major plus a minor and go from there with a career in the working world. College education cost a lot of money as well time, if you don't want to waste money or time, I would take consulting with your college department adviser or counselor to see if they have a career recommendation test and use that as a guideline.
Im a business major. Yeah, that's the question im asking myself right now, whats better for the long term. Im trying to find a career in business that could maybe relate to both or find a specific business aspect that I really enjoy. Thank you Daisy L. Translate
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Karen’s Answer

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Hello Daisy,

I think many young (and older) people struggle with this. My focus was more on getting a job and I regret not spending more time on finding a career that fits my interests. So if I had the opportunity to go back and advice my younger self, this is what I would tell her.

Although a career is important, it is not everything in your adult life. Money is important, but it is not everything. Finding a job/career that interests you will bring much more satisfaction and less stress. So while you are young and have more time, really focus on what you enjoy. What do you dream about when you daydream? What do you enjoy doing in your spare time? Now go find volunteer opportunities in those fields. This will give you real experience in those types of positions and more importantly open the door to people you can talk to about other opportunities in that field. HR would be a good place to start. Ask for an appointment with the HR rep to pick their brain. Try to learn all the different types of jobs and companies that have those types of positions (there will be more than you can think). They may even know some recruiters that you could reach out to that specialize in your interests. The more people you can get to know in your field of interest, the better and easier things will be for you.

Best of luck!
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Tiffany’s Answer

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Hello!

I struggled with this a lot too-- I had so many things that I loved doing, so it was hard to choose just one path. And, that's ok. There is a book called "What Motivates Me" by Adrian Gostick that I would encourage. Sometimes, it isn't just about finding what you are passionate about-- it is about finding what truly motivates you. That will help you find a career that is exciting! After reading this book and taking the quiz, I was able to better understand what I really wanted out of a career, and that helped me focus.

Good luck!
I agree I want to really focus on what motivates me, I just need to figure our what that is. I'm definitely going to have to give it a read! I was needing something new and interesting to read during this quarantine anyways! Thank you so much! Daisy L. Translate
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Selena’s Answer

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Hi Daisy! As a recent graduate student, I can sympathize with the challenge you're facing in figuring out what you might like to do! I think there is a common theme in your question; based on your interest in teaching or counselling it seems that you have an underlying passion for helping others. Perhaps this can be combined with your interest in the business world! It might be worthwhile for you to check out positions in Human Relations or Human Resources, or to look into the field of "Industrial- Organizational Psychology". Good luck!
It's good to have somebody to sympathize with! I hope you find your passion, or congratulations if you found it already! I really think your advice helped me a lot because I was thinking about looking into human resources! Thank you a lot! Daisy L. Translate
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Amanda’s Answer

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How exciting that you are close to graduating and thinking about a career in business. Something that helped me was going to a career counselor on campus (maybe they are taking appointments virtually) and they can help do a series of aptitude tests that can help give you a couple of ideas. It was really insightful and ultimately led me to a decision to go to graduate school to pursue my current career.
That sounds like a fabulous idea I will try to get in contact with the counselors! Thank you! Daisy L. Translate
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Lisa’s Answer

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I think our passions change as we get older, and the way you are feeling now will change in 10 years I promise! I completed an Art degree and had big plans to be a professional artist. Once I graduated, I answered an ad for a recruiting role at a temporary agency and fell in love with recruiting. 20 years later I am now a Corporate Recruiter and have loved my career path. I realized I was passionate about helping people find jobs and make those career connections. Keep focused on what brings you joy and you will find your passion.
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Chris’s Answer

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Hi Daisy,

To me, that's what college is partially about. It's about taking courses and finding out what you like and what you don't like. For me, I loved history and horticulture but figured that a degree in either would limit me to what I could do in the future. I hated statistics with a passion and knew that I was not going to be a statistician just based on that. What I did know was that I liked the interaction with people and had exposure to sales and marketing with my dad's company. So I chose to get a degree in marketing. Do I use it now? No, I do not but what it did was give me the basis to start working and get experience in an array of fields until I found my way in real estate.

My recommendation for any young college student is to take classes that might seem interesting as electives. If you like them, then additional courses that can fit in your degree plan can be taken. Get summer jobs or internships that apply to what you think you will like. Hands on learning will really show you what the job is all about. Sometimes we have an idea in our minds of what a job should be vs. the reality of what a job really is.

Good luck in your pursuit, whatever you decide. Remember, happiness in a career is extremely important and happiness can only be defined individually.

Chris recommends the following next steps:

  • Take courses that interest you
  • Internship
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Tiffany’s Answer

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Hello!

I struggled with this a lot too-- I had so many things that I loved doing, so it was hard to choose just one path. And, that's ok. There is a book called "What Motivates Me" by Adrian Gostick that I would encourage. Sometimes, it isn't just about finding what you are passionate about-- it is about finding what truly motivates you. That will help you find a career that is exciting! After reading this book and taking the quiz, I was able to better understand what I really wanted out of a career, and that helped me focus.

Good luck!
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Alex’s Answer

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Your degree of personal fit in a job depends on your chances of excelling in the job, if you work at it. Personal fit is even more important than most people think, because it increases your impact, job satisfaction and career capital.

Research shows that it’s really hard to work out what you’re going to be good at ahead of time, especially through self-reflection.
Instead, go investigate. After an initial cut-down of your options, learn more and then try them out.

Minimise the costs of trying out your options by doing cheap tests first (usually start by speaking to people), then trying your options in the best order (e.g. business jobs before non-profit jobs).

Keep adapting your plan over time. Think like a scientist investigating a hypothesis.
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jill’s Answer

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I also went to college and got a degree in education. I ended up meeting someone who had the same background as I but who was in recruiting. I decided to try that rather than going back for my masters, and ended up staying in this career. I then volunteered in schools when my kids were younger. Best of both worlds. If you were to take any of the personality tests education psychology and HR/people related roles will all come up as potential fits. Just be open and take a chance! Good luck!
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Bronwyn’s Answer

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I think it's great that you have entertained so many options. Try not to limit yourself to any opportunity, even if it is a bit out of the realm of your focus. Travel if you can through any programs where you will do service work, and keep yourself open to internship possibilities. I can't stress the last option enough!

I was a psych major and was determined to be a therapist. When I did get into graduate school to continue, I realized I was more interested in getting out into the world. I have had a few different corporate jobs over the years, but in the end, have been a career Executive Assistant supporting C-level executives for many years. It definitely was not where I thought I would end up, but I realized I was good at my job, always willing to learn and go the extra mile... sometimes that extra mile is where you get the most benefit in learning.

Be open to anything. Try anything that interests you. Recognize your strengths and think about how those strengths could transfer into a career. I know someone else mentioned Human Resources, which is great. There are so many aspects of psychology and so many different things you can do (training, recruiting, well-being, etc.). If those first few positions don't work, never worry - you will have learned skills to take you down another road.

Trust me, you will find your niche!
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Christopher’s Answer

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Hey, when I was nearing the end of college I had the same question. Heck even years after college I still had the same question. This is what I was told from mentors and leaders. If whatever it is that you want to do wakes you up in the middle of the night, if it is the first thing you think about when you wake up, if you find yourself having a solution to a problem others do not seem to seem, then usually that is your purpose. I read a few books to help me with this question. One that sticks out is Purpose Driven Life. I would suggest finding a good book, write down some questions that you specifically need answered and a good mentor.
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Tim’s Answer

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You may not find your "dream job" right out of college. In fact, I would venture to guess that it's a rare few who get the job of their dreams straight away. It's not unusual for people to switch jobs numerous times throughout their careers and even switch professions, so definitely don't fret about not being able to find the most satisfactory career path ever, straight out of school.

Also, bear in mind that your "dream job" might not be what it's cracked up to be - or vice versa - maybe you take a job that seems unpleasant when measured by its job description but you end up developing a passion for it. Most jobs are what you make of it, whether you're a janitor or the chief executive officer of Microsoft.

For now though, pursue what your gut tells you to pursue. You mentioned business seems interesting - that's great. Start thinking about what specifically in business you might want to do, and start networking like crazy. I got my first job in my industry (sports broadcasting) through sheer luck - my parents were friends with a family whose son worked in sports radio, which got me an internship there. Sometimes it can be that easy, but definitely don't discouraged if it takes you a little while to find something that might interest you. It took me a few months after I graduated college to find a full-time position in sports media that I wanted. Good luck!
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