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How do you motivate your employees?

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Doc’s Answer

Hi Harshirt,

The Simple Answer is – Give constant feedback and recognition.

So what we do in our office is give our employees a reason to stick around, we invest time and energy in to the people that you already have employed at your organization. Some opportunities we offer are: tuition reimbursement, mentorship, one-on-one coaching, or even allow “shadowing” of other teammates or members of the leadership team. All of these will help foster growth, create clear career pathing, and make sure everyone stays on track in hitting their individual and our company goals.

Making it a point to listen, and treat each person with respect in the workplace will make everyone feel more at ease. When people feel respected their are motivated to do their best. Remember, positive reinforcement will always work better than negative reinforcement.

Although Harshirt I think it's the free vending machine drinks.
Thank you comment icon Thank You Kim. No one is more cherished in this world than someone who lightens the burden of another. Doc Frick
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Andrea M.’s Answer

It is very helpful to understand people's unique strengths and create opportunities to showcase and nurture talent. When colleagues feel they are good at what they do and creating value - they are more engaged at work, more productive in their roles, and happier and healthier.

A great tool to understand strengths and how team members can empower each other is:
https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/252137/home.aspx
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John’s Answer

You show them honest and sincere appreciation. You compliment them with specifics on things they do well. You show a true interest in their lives by asking about specifics. For example, on Friday, when you ask your employee what he or she is doing that weekend, make a note of it. Then, on Monday, instead of asking "How was your weekend?", you ask, "How was that trip to the beach?" Remember everybody in the world has four letters on their forehead: MMFI -- Make Me Feel Important.
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Donna’s Answer

This is a really good question and very relevant. For me motivation comes from caring. Building a personal connection with each employee is important to me. Earning their trust and having them feel appreciated and cared for goes a long way. I let them know that I want them to succeed, not just here at the office but in their personal lives as well. Building a strong team that looks out for one another works for me. I have their backs and they know this, so they also have mine. They will go that extra mile to make sure that I am successful at meeting my goals as well.
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gabby’s Answer

Great question!

For me it's always been

*Positive feedback encourage them even when a mistake has taken place.
*Open communication and having an open door policy.
*WE not ME attitude I can't do it without them!
* Keeping a team environment by communicating constantly with them
*Making sure they are aware that everyone matters and that although we are different we are a team and everyone brings something to the group.
*Keeping an open mind being optimistic and realistic even during trying times
*Caring and showing that you care


These are my top ones.
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Michael’s Answer

First, you should take an interest in your employees. Learn what is important to them professionally and personally. There is no, one way for everyone. Each individual is motivated for different reasons. Try to find common ground with their objectives and the objectives you are looking to achieve with your team. Clearly define these objectives and set goals for each employee. Provide positive feedback and encouragement. If there are negatives, be careful with your message. Determine how you can provide constructive feedback in an encouraging manner that is professional and thoughtful. At the end of the day, your employees are people. They want to be treated as a person and not a number.
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Padmapriya’s Answer

Hi Harshit,

Good question. I lead a team and I understand the importance of motivation. Best answer would be to create career opportunities for them, identify their strengths, recognize their efforts, praising them publicly. Recognize great work. One of the most important factors that contribute to employee motivation is how often their hard work is recognized.

Celebrate results.
Set small, measurable goals.
Providing constructive feedback.
Being transparent and providing clarity
Encouraging team work/new ideas
Promote mindfulness
Have some fun

Hope this answers your question.



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Riley’s Answer

There are two schools of thought people can follow when trying to motivate a group of people. You could use fear to motivate, which would consist of setting punishments for employees who do not complete their work in the way that you would like. I used to work as a golf caddy at a country club, and something they did as a punishment that was a pretty fun way to keep people on their toes was a "wall of shame." When employees would do a job poorly or just call in sick too much they would have one of the other employees find a picture of them and post them on the "wall of shame," for a week. Since we were all friends and it was a very casual work environment, no one ever got upset and it motivated the employees to do their best every day.

On the other hand, most professional workplaces should look towards positive reinforcement, as it is more professional. This would be just paying attention to what employees to and giving them feedback on their work as well as recognizing their successes publicly. This can be done with an employee of the month program.
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Robert’s Answer

Hi!!!

For me its building the personal connections with each direct report. I find that there is always at least one item in their personal life we can bond over and build a relationship with. Making sure they get recognized for great achievements and congratulating the group as a whole for their contributions to the company.
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Tim’s Answer

Make sure you that you listen to the people you lead. You have join goals and you need to always have definable wins. Make sure to celebrate when your wins and learn from your challenges. Always pivot to the next adventure!
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Simeon’s Answer

To motivate employees, the best approach is to look for ways to make the work more intrinsically motivating. The more the employee finds some satisfaction in doing their work, the more likely they'll be to become assertive and reach for new goals.
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Mike’s Answer

Hi Harshit!

Great question! Here are a few suggestions, and techniques that I've used over the years, which have paid dividends and help motivate employees.

- Recognize employees for their achievements, and do so in a forum which is comfortable for them (e.g. email to the entire team, at an office luncheon or team meeting, in a small group which they are leading, or through formal recognition programs of cards / plaques / etc). The purpose is to demonstrate your appreciation and acknowledgement for the hard work, effort, and results, from the employee. i.e. "Thank You"

- Reward employees with something of value such as time off, another assignment of great importance to the team, or monetary compensation if permitted by the Company for their contribution. i.e. "Provide tangible reward"

- Demonstrate to the team that you're willing to 'roll up your sleeves' and get into the trenches with team team. This gesture signals that you're willing to help the team deliver, in addition to lead.

- Share your knowledge and experience. This builds strength through common abilities and shared experiences.

- Take an interest in your team members, acknowledge their goals, clear roadblocks preventing them from achieving their objectives.

- Show respect and share vulnerabilities through diversity-based exercises. Something I do often with the team is "Who I Am" poems. Employees share brief statements of "I Am.." followed by something that defines them, their character, personality, beliefs, etc. This is conducted in team meetings, and is a great conversation piece to start building a foundation of trust within the team.

- Be strong in periods of uncertainty. Acknowledge people's fears, provide a vision and strategy to overcome obstacles, and lead the team through adversity but be willing to act upon feedback to course correct whenever necessary. i.e. Be open to comments, and constructive criticism.

Last but not least, be truthful, transparent, show empathy, and be compassionate.

Hope that helps!
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Brandon’s Answer

This is what motivates me in the workplace: Honest pay, congratulate/thank employees for achievements, bonuses, great benefits, limiting confusion for roles/work, leadership/management actually treating employees with full respect.
Going union for any company is always beneficial. Employees will earn promising pay increases, excellent benefits and they pay a SMALL amount of money for union dues.

The way that I look at motivating employees will keep them working for a company that invests in them.
Keep in mind that the number one reason employees work somewhere is for the money.
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Kim’s Answer

Hi Harshit!

I recently retired, and always use to joke that I was working on a book, titled "How NOT to manage." The thing with motivating employees that makes it a bit of a challenge is that not all employees will be motivated in the same way.

Some examples:
1. our company implemented a "customer service award," which was handed out at the quarterly training meetings. We had people who then tried hard to NOT get the award, because they did not want to be called to walk to the front of the room! We had another guy who was constantly forwarding to his supervisor every thank you e-mail he received from a customer, so, at every meeting, he was called up for the award. He would receive it for doing little or nothing, rather than things that really constituted exceptional customer service. It became a joke.

2. We had quotas we were supposed to meet. The supervisor put up a big white board and posted everyone's numbers. While this was great for the leaders, the others felt like it was an attempt to shame them into doing better (it was).

I think transparency is important. So, if you select a particular employee to get to go to the convention in Vegas, or attend a training seminar, I think the selection process should be made known, preferably in advance. Favoritism undermines morale. Employees keep track of everything.

As far as me personally, I went to work already motivated to do my job. There were things my supervisor did that killed off my sense of motivation, which included chastising me in front of customers.

So, each employee is different. If you have not already read it, I recommend the book, the One Minute Manager.
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