Skip to main content
3 answers
3
Updated 1153 views

What are some careers in the Environmental Design major?

I'm thinking about possibly studying Environmental Design. I love design and people told me it's a growing field. #general #environmental-services #science #design

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

3

3 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Anne’s Answer

I have a different viewpoint = maybe because I work in the public sector and for a water utility. We use firms to design stormwater management facilities. There is also a future in passive wastewater systems, which could be considered environmental design. I also see jobs for landscape architects. I would investigate those sorts of programs at universities. Here are some links:

https://www.asla.org/aboutlandscapearchitecture.aspx

http://hort.auburn.edu/programs-of-study/undergraduate/

http://www.thebestcolleges.org/10-best-landscape-architecture-programs/


Ira is right to steer you toward an engineering career. There are always jobs for engineers and they usually pay well. I tried to study engineering, but switched to science - I just liked it better. You need to have a career in something you enjoy doing. You'll be doing it for a long time.

environmental design landscape-architecture
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Ira’s Answer

Hello, Lydia.
I'm not sure what you mean by environmental design. Is this for remediation, as in groundwater, wastewater, storm water management, or community spaces? I recommend that avoid going into any kind of environmental compliance work. This field is too crazy and too hard to get hired. If you stick with wastewater design, I don't see many postings. Nor do i see much for water resource (storm water) management. In short, if you are working as a consultant, the clients see you as an EXPENSE ITEM. Same if you are a company manager in this area. Learn how to develop business openings.

AVOID THIS FIELD. I suggest you become a mechanical engineer, and design the pollution control equipment if you want to stay in it. Air pollution control is the way to go. This will hopefully let you move into manufacturing, which is a lot more secure, if you have the skills. Also, plan a career with goals. Where do you expect to be 5, 10, 15 years down the road for both position and money? Don't become a generalist. Specialize in one or two things.

One last thing: trust your instincts. If the job looks to be in jeopardy, or you can't get accepted in the company culture by co-workers, or your boss isn't in your corner, time to move on. You should also interview at least yearly to keep your interview skills sharp. Read all you can about it. Good luck
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Fred N.’s Answer

Hi Lydia,

Individual buildings and area development have to incorporate various elements of "environmental design." This is usually an aspect handled by professionals who obtain a degree in, and are licensed in such areas as building or landscape architecture, or structural or civil engineering. There are also more general certifications "LEEDS" that individuals can get trained and certified in practicing - - but this tends to augment an existing professional degree/training. I hope some of this is helpful. Good luck.

Regards,

Fred
0