5 answers

Should I do 2 years of community college instead of going straight to a 4 year?

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I was wondering if it was worth it going straight into a 4 year if I have the ability to go to community college. I don’t have funds for a 4 year university, but I am also afraid I won’t be as competitive wants I apply to medical school one day. I am just not sure what option is better.

#communitycollege #college #july20

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5 answers

EmilyAnn’s Answer

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I would say it all depends on your personal wants/needs. I go to a 4 year college myself, but I know plenty of people who transferred from community college! It's a great way to get your general ed courses out of the way and it tends to be a lot more affordable. As long as you make sure the colleges you're looking to transfer to will accept your credits (they almost always do), you're golden! In my opinion, this will not make you any less competitive. It isn't always about where you go, but what you make of it. Plus, since you plan on going to medical school, I think it would be smart to go this route!

Either way, you won't really make a wrong choice. Good luck! :)
I agree its a smart option to start at a community college to save some money! Not as many schools accept transfer credits for your classes as you would think though! If you're considering transferring to a state school, it should be fine, but a lot of private universities do not sadly :( Morgan King Translate
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Sydney’s Answer

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You have to consider a lot of different things.
1. Money, are you trying to save money or is your major going to be able to pay off the eventual created student debt?
2. What is your major? Will you stick to it? How much will they make?

Personally, community college is great if you're trying to save money but most student tend to be there for 3-4 years typically so the 2 year community college idea is if you don't have any other life and are only working on your classes in community college, typically 15+ units will be needed to complete in 2 years.

I went with a 4 year school because I didn't need to worry about money and I knew my major would take care of created debt when I graduated and got my degree and career. I think it is definitely saving me time. But, also, consider the college you are going to as well. Will they be able to help you get a job quickly, how do they teach, is that teaching style fitting your learning style?

There are a lot of different factors that go into deciding between the two but most people boil it down to money. If you can afford going to a 4 year then I would suggest you do, it goes by much faster and you can get moving a lot quicker.
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Angela D.’s Answer

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Greetings! This is a great question that I answered for Helal B. and reposting it here for you and others.

I'm going to provide a real life example. My son went to a community college for two years to complete his lower division prerequisites, then transferred to the University of California to complete a double major in genetics and biology. While he was waiting to get into UCDavis, he trained and worked as an EMT (Emergency Medical Technician). His GPA (grade point average) and his MCAT (Medical College Admission Test) scores were important, as well as his work experience, community service, research, and shadowing. If you don't want to get an M.D., you can also consider a D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) degree or P.A. (Physician Assistant) degree. I would suggest researching all avenues open to you, including an R.N. (Registered Nurse). Be careful of international options and check them out carefully. Talk with your school counselor and keep in touch with your academic counselor(s) after you graduate high school to stay on track. Please see below.
FYI - My son is currently completing his residency to become a rural general medicine doctor. He also became an Army National Guard Reserve Captain/Field Surgeon in a Medical Unit who also teaches/trains others. A way to help pay for medical school and serve our country/service people.
Wishing you the best in your endeavors, Dr. B

https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/top-medical-schools/articles/how-to-make-sure-you-fulfill-medical-school-requirements-for-admission

Angela D. recommends the following next steps:

  • Online Research
  • Work Experience
  • Community Service/Volunteering/Shadowing
  • Medical Research if available
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Lesley’s Answer

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When it comes to paying for college, a two-year school can be a savvy start to your college education. Four reasons to consider a community college:

1) Save on Tuition - Community Colleges are thousands of dollars cheaper per credit compared to Universities. A core class credit is the same credit whether you paid $300 for it or $3000 dollars.
2) Save on Room and Board - Choose a local community college to save those dorm expenses for the first couple of years.
3) Work While in School - Many Community Colleges have multiple locations and online courses.
4) Get an Academic Boost - A chance to make up for poor high school records.

Make sure that you meet with an academic counselor at both the Community College and the University that you want to transfer too. That way you don't waste time on course that you don't need. This also gives you an opportunity to explore different majors without committing to huge tuition fees. Hope this helps.


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Linda’s Answer

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Hi Kimberly. If you don't have funds for a four year university, do seriously consider two years at a community college. A community college is a great place to take general education courses that are prerequisites for graduation in most universities along with your chosen major. To make yourself attractive to a four year university and also medical school, get involved. By getting involved I mean joining clubs, doing internships (if available), finding leadership opportunities, job shadowing in various health professions, etc. You want to demonstrate that you are well-rounded and are more than someone who gets good grades.
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