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What is working in power engineering like?

Hello, I am an electrical engineering student and have recently been exploring fields in EE. Can you help me understand what skills would I need to work in power? is the work you do interesting and engaging? and some general advice and tips would be great.

Thank you for your help.

#july20 #electrical #power #engineering


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Michelle’s Answer

I applaud your choice as EE. I myself am an ME, but I still admire you.

I have worked in Natural Gas and Oil, and currently work in Nuclear Power. I have been in an Engineering position since 1998. I think Engineering degrees in general are one of the most flexible degrees you can get with an endless possibility of fields you can work in.... I am living proof.

To be specific to your question, working in power requires a strict adherence to rules, regulations, and most of all the safety of the public. Skills would include strong math and science knowledge, willingness to rework problems from all angles (and not take offense when your errors are pointed out to you), and an ability to work long hours while balancing work and family life.

I recommend all the job shadowing and internships you can complete before graduation, as well as joining clubs and volunteering to gain networking contacts. Using online opportunities now and in person positions later. Many businesses may not be offering internships at this point on time, but contact them to ask if you could listen in online meetings and training, be assign a mentor from their station, etc.(try contacting HR and any department that deals with volunteers). You could even contact your city or county to ask if you could meet with their city planner or city engineer, online or by phone.

Overall energy fields are going to fluctuate over the years based on laws, politics, the economy, or technological advances. Examples: what is "green" energy today may be taboo tomorrow, what is sci-fy this decade (electric self-driving cars) may be a reality the next, Natural gas was so popular (increase in demand made prices go up, increase in supply and natural gas production made prices go down)... any way I have watched it change from decade to decade. Be prepared to ride out the changes with integrity, your signature/name is your reputation.

Good luck, I rambled on enough. Overall, stick with Engineering it will be a good choice. I have used my ME to work in Civil, Environmental, Petroleum, Federal and State government, Nuclear... and now Performance Improvement!

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Updated Translate

Michelle’s Answer

I applaud your choice as EE. I myself am an ME, but I still admire you.

I have worked in Natural Gas and Oil, and currently work in Nuclear Power. I have been in an Engineering position since 1998. I think Engineering degrees in general are one of the most flexible degrees you can get with an endless possibility of fields you can work in.... I am living proof.

To be specific to your question, working in power requires a strict adherence to rules, regulations, and most of all the safety of the public. Skills would include strong math and science knowledge, willingness to rework problems from all angles (and not take offense when your errors are pointed out to you), and an ability to work long hours while balancing work and family life.

I recommend all the job shadowing and internships you can complete before graduation, as well as joining clubs and volunteering to gain networking contacts. Using online opportunities now and in person positions later. Many businesses may not be offering internships at this point on time, but contact them to ask if you could listen in online meetings and training, be assign a mentor from their station, etc.(try contacting HR and any department that deals with volunteers). You could even contact your city or county to ask if you could meet with their city planner or city engineer, online or by phone.

Overall energy fields are going to fluctuate over the years based on laws, politics, the economy, or technological advances. Examples: what is "green" energy today may be taboo tomorrow, what is sci-fy this decade (electric self-driving cars) may be a reality the next, Natural gas was so popular (increase in demand made prices go up, increase in supply and natural gas production made prices go down)... any way I have watched it change from decade to decade. Be prepared to ride out the changes with integrity, your signature/name is your reputation.

Good luck, I rambled on enough. Overall, stick with Engineering it will be a good choice. I have used my ME to work in Civil, Environmental, Petroleum, Federal and State government, Nuclear... and now Performance Improvement!

0