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What are some great and important things to remember before applying for an Aerospace Engineering job?

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My dream is to become an Aerospace Engineer because planes amazes me every single time. Everytime I see a plane, I wonder how it could lift off when it has 200 or 300 passengers, how it can travel for up to 24 hours without stopping, and etc. I been on planes multiple times and every time I go on a plane, everything feels new. I want to be a part of this industry so that one day, I can inspire others to join this group.

#july20 #july2020 #july20 #july2020
#aerospace #engineer #motivation
#july20 #july2020 #airline-industry

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John’s Answer

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First thing is to have a 4 year degree. Aerospace Companies hire Aerospace Engineers, Mechanical Engineers, Electrical and many other fields.

Having some hands on or internship experience helps.

Decide what size company you want to work for and location. Large companies will have you focused in a specific job where as smaller companies will involve you in many types of jobs. Also, salary varies, benefits varies, resources varies depending on the size.

Research the company as well as the jobs. This will give you a better idea what the responsibilities are from company to company. Through linked-in and other social media ways to connect with people that work at these companies you can ask how they like the company and their jobs.

This will help you prepare for a better interview as well.

Good luck!

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Robert’s Answer

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First off, bravo on your inspiration and love of aviation! My advice on looking into aviation is that it can be very difficult to make it thru the education. With that said it is not impossible obviously, but you need to understand that it will be hard and require commitment and perseverance to succeed. The job of aerospace engineer varies depending on whether you work for an airline or support shop, a design company, a production company, or a civil aviation authority. If your education is sufficiently difficult, you should find that all the actual jobs you can do are easier than the schooling.

Secondly, aviation is a small community and every opportunity should be explored and contacts cultivated. You never know if who you are dealing with may open another door or a past relationship may come back later to offer success in your current role. Like so many things, aviation is never a one person job and working with a team is key so be sure to start building those skills in school.

Lastly, fear of the unknown never justifies inaction so face the challenges within aviation with confidence and a positive attitude. Be the person who keeps learning and welcomes the most difficult task ... if you can master that you will set yourself apart from the rest.
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Robert’s Answer

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First off, bravo on your inspiration and love of aviation! My advice on looking into aviation is that it can be very difficult to make it thru the education. With that said it is not impossible obviously, but you need to understand that it will be hard and require commitment and perseverance to succeed. The job of aerospace engineer varies depending on whether you work for an airline or support shop, a design company, a production company, or a civil aviation authority. If your education is sufficiently difficult, you should find that all the actual jobs you can do are easier than the schooling.

Secondly, aviation is a small community and every opportunity should be explored and contacts cultivated. You never know if who you are dealing with may open another door or a past relationship may come back later to offer success in your current role. Like so many things, aviation is never a one person job and working with a team is key so be sure to start building those skills in school.

Lastly, fear of the unknown never justifies inaction so face the challenges within aviation with confidence and a positive attitude. Be the person who keeps learning and welcomes the most difficult task ... if you can master that you will set yourself apart from the rest.
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Jacklyn’s Answer

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Aerospace engineering is a very broad discipline. Here are just a few of the types of jobs you could have working in the commercial aircraft industry. You could start looking at job posting at major aerospace engineering companies and their manufactures to see what types of jobs they offer. You can setup alerts through the company's websites, Google Jobs, Linked In, Zip Recruiter or similar job sites.

Propulsion - Works on the engines to increase performance and reliability.

Aeroacoustic - Studies how much noise aircraft make. Want to reduce noise for the sake of the public, to decrease turbulence and to increase fuel efficiency. Know boundary layer theory and aerodynamics.

Structures - Work on the physical structures of aircraft. You should know computer aided design (CAD) and finite element analysis (FEA). You design parts in CAD and you test their strength in FEA software. Some tests are still done to physical products, but FEA is used in the initial design.

Materials - Look at what kinds of material to use in aircraft parts. Always looking for something lighter and stronger. Aircraft are pressurized and depressurized a lot and the wings flex and the landing gear have many impacts. You need materials that can take cyclic loading. For the engines, you also need something that can take a lot of heat and expansion and be hit by debris like birds.

Aerodynamics - You look at how a plane flies. You try to decrease drag and increase lift. You use Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) software and maybe work in wind tunnels.

Manufacturing - You help the airplane actually get built. You turn the design into a reality and try to get as many planes out as quickly and safely as possibly. You work with technicians and actual hardware.

Electrical - If you are in power design, you figure out all the power requirements for the plane. Harness designer route and pick the actual cables and connectors.

Hydraulics - There are lots of pumps and pipes in planes. You design these.

Instrumentation - Sensors and interfaces on flight deck and elsewhere.

Requirements - What requirements are there for new or modifications to existing aircraft. You would with customers often.

Machining - You might need to work with parts that are being manufactured. They probably use things like CNC Mills or things like that composite laying robot.

Integration - Making sure all the systems work together.

Testing - You might test various aspects of the plane to make sure they work and are within standards. You might ever be the engineer who writes the standards or maintenance documentation.

Maintenance - Aircraft need lots of maintenance. You make sure it is accomplishes quickly, safely, and to specification. I liked this since I got to work with the hardware.

Flight Testing - Test new planes to see if the design meets reality.

Reliability - Data analysis to see what is breaking and how often it needs repairs and general data insights.



There are lots more. These are just the ones I could think of off the top of my head. I would look online and find YouTube videos for different jobs. Rarely does a job title say "aerospace engineer".
I volunteered with https://www.aaiaeroverse.com. They are putting up free and some paid courses to teach K-12 about aviation. Might be worth checking out.

Good luck!
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