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What is the deciding factor for someone deciding which type of law to study?

#law #choices #law-practice

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Heather’s Answer

All law students come out with the same degree and your grades are all very important, so echoing Glenn, do your best in any and all classes you take because it impacts your GPA and class rank. However, many law schools also offer several different certificate programs to provide some type of specialization. Typically, those certificate programs also have some type of support to connect law students with mentors and educational opportunities in that field to help facilitate getting a job in that area after graduation. Additionally, I'd suggest you volunteer at as many different types of events in a variety of industries to help you understand the different types of law. Law schools will have different student organizations focused on different areas of laws that likely have panels of professionals. Go to them! Ask questions and start checking things off that you like and don't like. Then you can focus your job search and demonstrate a level of specialization that many of your peers likely won't have.
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Glenn’s Answer

You ask a very good question. Unlike undergraduate studies, or other types of graduate studies, a study of the law to receive your law degree involves mostly a broad overview of the law, and is not intended to make students into specialists in any area of the law. That comes with time and experience.
So, my suggestion is to take classes in law school that will help you prepare to pass the bar, that will give you a good basic foundation in the law, and then to the extent you can, take classes that interest you.
Additionally, your ability to get a good job after law school is not nearly so dependent upon the classes you take as the grades you get. So, whatever classes you take, do well in them.
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Pro’s Answer

Study them all! If you have multiple interests you might try an Interdisciplinary, Liberal Studies, or General Studies major, that will let you combine multiple interests. Or an Individually Designed major that you can even name yourself.
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Linda’s Answer

When I started law school I had no idea what type of law I wanted to practice. Some people already know when they enter law school because of their undergraduate degree. Some engineers go on to patent law or other intellectual property. If you are like me and had no idea what you wanted to do, take a few classes in different areas of the law to see if something sparks your interest. For example, if you love music or movies you might want to look at copyright and contracts law. I decided to try litigation, and although I eventually decided I didn't want to do that long term, it was fantastic training and I'm so glad I did it. In addition, don't forget that there are many different types of places to practice law when you graduate, so knowing yourself helps with this decision too. For example, you could work in a law firm, a corporation, a government agency, a non-profit, etc. A law degree opens many doors. I was in a law firm for several years, which was great experience, but I have been happiest working in corporations where I advise and help the business people meet their goals. So in addition to reviewing your interests also look at your personality to see what motivates you. Do well in your classes and also volunteer for opportunities offered by your law school. Good luck!
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Jonathan’s Answer

Your interests, what you are good at, and the deans for that work in the geographical area you are planning at. For example I wanted to do it international M&A going into the interview process in my second year. I was interested in it, I was good at it, and I thought there was that work in the area I was going to practice in. Unfortunately there wasn’t that type of work I the city I would start in despite the fact it was an international city the work I wanted was in NYC. So I ended up at a top NYC Firm with an office where my law school was in its.workd class restructuring department. Now I focus on helping investors and companies do M&A work in the Restructuring process.
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