Skip to main content
4 answers
4
Asked 1081 views

When offered your first job, or a full-time position, what are some important questions to contemplate over before making your acceptance?

My name is David, an Information Technology major, who is not only career-focused, but also eager to know how to make careful, personal decisions as I progress in my career. #jobs #career-choice #career-paths #first-job #career-plan

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

4

4 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Yijing’s Answer

Hi David,


From my perspective, for the first job, It's more important to focus the development opportunities it can brings to you and try to improve yourself.

The job itself actually doesn't matter that much.


Taking myself as example, when I graduated, I got the best job among all of my friends and classmates. It's a big and famous company and give relatively high salary. One of my another friend, who only get a normal job. However, He keeps learning many new technologies and expand his professional network. Soon, a headhunter notice him and introduce him a great job. He successfully pass the interview and his salary & position is even higher than me.


Therefore, for choosing companies, do not focus on current salary, just focus on the growing possibilities it can brings to you.

Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, Yijing. Also, would you mind if I ask, how did the headhunter noticed your friend? To be clear, what was something that you're friend did to make the headhunter notice him/her? Did he/she use social media, such as LinkedIn, or met with the headhunter in-person? David
Thank you comment icon There are multiple ways. Manage a great Linkedin Profile can help headhunters reach you. For my friends, he joined many conferences and meet many HR here. Then they reach him. Yijing Bai
Thank you comment icon That's good. Thank you again, and may I stay in touch with you whenever possible? David
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kim’s Answer

Honestly David, jobs are hard to get. When you are just starting out, if someone offers you a job, you take it. period. There's a little more to it, but not much.


Is the job paying the normal entry level salary for that position in that city? (you need to do some research. See the Glassdoor website and others for salary information)
Is it within a reasonable commute distance, and if not, will you be able to afford to move closer?
Will having this employer's name on your resume be a bad thing? (There are some employers who, once you work for them, no one else wants to hire you. If this is not the case, then go for it).


If the job is really close to your house, it cuts down the commute cost, so the pay can be a little lower. If you are going to get really great training, or get the chance to work with someone who is highly regarded in the field, that also makes it worth taking even if the pay is a little low. Your first job is a stepping stone. Plan to stay for two years, then start looking. And continually work on your education, so you are always current in what is going on in your field. Best of luck!

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Ken’s Answer

Hi David!


Here are some comments from people who have been there and have good advice:


https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-right-and-wrong-way-to-choose-your-first-job
http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-choose-your-first-job-2013-4
http://www.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/worklife/06/25/cb.first.job/

Thank you comment icon Thank you for sharing Mr. Simmons. I'll definitely look into these resources. David
Thank you comment icon You are welcome! Best of luck! Please keep me posted! i would like to follow your progress! Ken Simmons
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Marilyn’s Answer

Your first full-time job is important, but it is a first step. If your job is in your field of interest, good for you! It is difficult these days to go into an entry level job in your major field. Often, even if you have taken coursework in your field of interest, experience on the job may help you to see that is not where you would like to be for the major portion of your career. Jobs are not plentiful, so it is good to accept and learn what is involved in the field. Kim mentioned proximity of commute which is important, but if you live in the Houston area, commuting is usually essential anyway. Look also at the possibility of advancement at the job as well as financial increases. If however this is your first job, it may be more important to gain the experience and once you have that on your resume, investigate other options. Plan to remain for a couple of years so you can really experience the job and working with others in the company. Note how successful employees function, and see what other educational opportunities will yield for your future. I wish you all the best.

0