7 answers

What is the average salary of a Marine Biologist???

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I want to be a Marine Biologist. #biology #wildlife-biology #usability #financial-planning

7 answers

abdul’s Answer

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A Marine Biologist earns an average salary of $51,289 per year. There are many answers to this question and I would say that a marine biologist is someone who works in some way in studying, observing, protecting, or managing marine organisms, be they microbe, plant or animal. If you study marine fish populations you are a marine biologist. If you manage a marine wildlife preserve and are concerned with protection of marine organisms there, then you too are a marine biologist. You know you're a marine biologist if you have a notebook or computer that you record information often about marine organisms. But you may also be a marine biologist if you are collecting sponges, looking for bioactive drugs. You may be counting them, doing DNA sequencing of them, observing them in the laboratory or making theoretical models predicting their abundance once fishing is decreased. So marine biologists do many things, but what they have in common is working with marine organisms. Marine Biologists earn a median hourly wage of $34.04. Hourly wages typically start from $19.09 and go up to $59.94.

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Thank you so much sir ......Is that job available in India???
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Thank you so much sir ......Is that job available in India???

Arun’s Answer

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Marine Biologists earn a median hourly wage of $34.04. Hourly wages typically start from $19.09 and go up to $59.94. Average Marine Biologist Yearly Salary in the United States. Marine Biologists earn a median salary of $70,800 per year.

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Thank you sir ,....Is that job available in India???

aftab’s Answer

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Marine Biologists earn a median salary of $70,800 per year. Salaries typically start from $39,700 and go up to $124,680.(United States)

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bharath’s Answer

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$51,957 Education: PhD. Salary: A Marine Biologist Median Salary is $51,957. Marine Biologist Salary: Becoming a Marine Biologist. For readers who want more info about the average marine biologist salary or careers in marine biology, you have come to the right interview.

John ’s Answer

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Marine biology is the scientific study of organisms in the ocean or other marine bodies of water. Given that in biology many phyla, families and genera have some species that live in the sea and others that live on land, marine biology classifies species based on the environment rather than on taxonomy. Marine biology differs from marine ecology as marine ecology is focused on how organisms interact with each other and the environment, while biology is the study of the organisms themselves.

However the salary is roughly $70,800 per year...

vishaka’s Answer

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Average Salary: $51,180

Expected Lifetime Earnings: $2,137,000

The monetary rewards for marine biologists range from not great to modest to somewhat okay. Right out of college, a graduate can expect to make around $30k each year. The more initials you have after your name, the more money you'll tend to make, though. Those with master's degrees bring home more dough, while a doctorate degree can get you around $80k-plus a year.

But don't forget location, location, location. What you pull in—salary-wise, that is—can depend on where you work. Those toiling in private firms tend to make more than those on the government dime, say $100k vs. $70k, at the top end of the salary scale.

The true reward for these intrepid marine biologists is the satisfaction that their work not only helps the environment now, but also well into the future. If you love the ocean, but really need to make the big bucks, steer clear of marine biology, and satisfy your love for the sea with a nice aquarium.

parikshith’s Answer

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While a graduate degree is far from a necessity en route to becoming a marine biologist or an active and contributing member to the world of conservation, most successful researchers would tell you that an M.S. or Ph.D. degree could be added to the list of education needed to be a marine biologist. By this point you’ve had ample time to explore a number of marine biology avenues and can concentrate on a narrowly-focused research interest. Find schools and professors that have research programs and focuses similar to your own interests. MarineBio.org’s list of schools also shows whether M.S. or Ph.D. degrees are available.