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Are there good job opportunities right after undergrad?

As of right now, I am interested in majoring in chemical engineering or mathematics in college. engineering math jobs college

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Joseph’s Answer

There are always job opportunities available after your undergrad. Networking is one of the best ways to find employment. Start with family members, friends, neighbors, coworkers and professors to inquire about opportunities and get some leads. Join and attend professional organization meetings in your field. I would advise starting your search before you graduate and visiting your college's career center.
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Ben’s Answer

Absolutely, but why wait until after college. Research internships and paid internships in your field of study. You may even want to take those opportunities into consideration when evaluating your choice of colleges. Many times engineering schools and mathematics departments will have close ties to local companies in related industries that will offer internships to those school's students.
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Farhan’s Answer

Mathematics is a very useful major and can serve a person well in virtually any industry they choose to enter. Knowledge and mastery of subjects like probability, statistics, combinatorics (counting theory) etc. can form the foundation of successful careers as a data scientist, a business analyst, financial analyst or similar. A strong foundation in math will also serve a person well in furthering their careers within the natural sciences like chemistry, biology and physics. Math and science also teach one to think logically and develop problem-solving skills. This will invaluable in any kind of engineering setting, from aerospace to civil to software. Virtually every industry relies heavily on data and its interpretation to grow and unlock new opportunities. Companies will always need people who can sift through mounds of data to unlock and tell the story behind the numbers.

There are numerous great job opportunities for math and science majors after undergrad, especially if coupled with a minor in computer science. A lot of tech companies employ data scientists to help them improve existing products or build new ones. Marketing firms need analysts to refine their targeting and create more effective campaigns. Insurance companies have strong career tracks for actuaries who help manage risk. SpaceX has made rockets cool again and the aerospace industry should have plenty of entry level positions available. Political polling is a field that is due for a shake up as a result of poor predictions in recent election cycles. Manufacturing companies have complex supply chains that need effective managers. So, yes, there are a lot of good opportunities out there for math and science majors following graduation. In fact, one of the best things one can do following graduation is to get some real world work experience before diving into grad school.

Farhan recommends the following next steps:

Find an industry or a company you are interested in and see if they are offering any internships.
Reach out to someone on LinkedIn who has what you consider to be an interesting job and offer to buy them coffee or lunch in exchange for an informational interview.
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John’s Answer

Petunie chemical engineers are employed in many industries other than chemical manufacturing. Some are employed in biotechnology, business services, healthcare, food manufacturing, electronics and energy manufacturing. Due to the waste materials and other dangers that come along with chemical manufacturing, chemical engineers exercise extreme caution to ensure the safety of customers and other employees. The field of chemical engineering offers a variety of opportunities to work on specialized, innovative projects. Chemical engineers must be highly skilled in calculus, chemistry, physics and biology. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expects chemical engineering jobs to grow 11% between 2018 and 2028, which is considered about as fast as the average (www.bls.gov). Job opportunities in this field are directly impacted by product demand in the manufacturing industry. Energy and biotechnology companies, however, are increasingly hiring chemical engineers to help manufacture their products.

• BIOCHEMICAL – This field focuses on the chemical processes occurring naturally in plants and animals. Food companies hire chemical engineers to improve crop yields by developing safer pest control products for farmers and distributors. Utility companies employ chemical engineers who examine ways to dispose of waste more efficiently while delivering supplies of clean drinking water to challenging locations.
• PHARMACEUTICALS – In conjunction with medical researchers, chemical engineers help design and operate the equipment that produces life-enhancing drugs. Chemical engineers specialize in taking the concepts of new drugs from the lab to the factory floor by discovering ways to scale these new inventions. Over time, their efforts produce medicine that costs less for consumers and can be made more efficiently in facilities around the world.
• HEALTH – Those interested in working as a chemical engineer may also be interested in a career as an occupational health and safety specialist since they both involve safe work practices. As an occupational health and safety health specialist, your focus will be to ensure safety in the workplace. You will do so by examining workplaces for safety hazards, providing ways for organizations to better protect employees, and looking into accidents that occur in the workplace. Occupational health and safety specialists often work for government agencies or manufacturing companies and will need a bachelor's degree.
• AGRICULTURE – People considering chemical engineering may also want to consider agricultural engineering since they both require problem-solving skills. As an agricultural engineer, you will focus on improving farming power sources, machinery, and how farming products are stored. Your job duties may involve utilizing computer programs to streamline farming methods, such as new equipment or improving building designs, performing safety tests on any new equipment, and collaborating with engineering colleagues, clients, and builders to maximize equipment and building functions. You may work for engineering services firms or government agencies and will need a bachelor's degree for this career.
• PETROLEUM – Petroleum is a finite resource, so chemical engineers constantly seek better ways to find and extract oil and natural gas. Oil companies deploy teams of chemical engineers to existing plants and refineries to improve production yields from dwindling fossil fuel deposits. Chemical engineers also travel to new drilling locations to help teams of scientists develop better ways to tap previously overlooked sources of oil and gas. At the same time, chemical engineers also search for safer and more efficient methods of developing oil-based products. By integrating smart production methods at the site of the drilling or during the refining process, chemical engineers have discovered ways to create useful products by recycling waste elements.

Hope this was helpful Petunie
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Atul’s Answer

Have you taken courses in Chemistry and Organic Chemistry to see if you enjoy these subjects?
Many high schools offer these courses.
If you like it pursue Chemical Engineering.
I have many friends in Chemical Engineering where they worked in the energy field or consumers products.
Are you willing to live in TX (oil companies) or OH where Procter & Gamble is located?
Translation: you will have to relocate where oil or consumer products based companies are.
If you have a degree in Math - one of the best jobs with this major is Actuary. This is a tough profession and you have to pass multiple exams become an Actuary. Many insurance companies need people with this background.
Backup could be working in software industry.
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Zully Velazquez’s Answer

Hello! That's a great question and one of the best approaches is for you to seek out internships. Perhaps speak to your guidance counselor for assistance, check out job search forums,etc. Your college may actually have access to local companies in your area seeking students to fill entry level roles which would be good experience for you. Consider it a stepping stone even if it's in a non-related area to your true interest.
You'll benefit from gaining skills but most importantly you begin networking.
Best of luck!
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Melisa’s Answer


Hi Petunie,

You have some great answers here and good suggestion to look further into industries and jobs that interest you. You can also use specific key words to search for jobs and ideas on sites like Indeed, Glassdoor and LinkedIN to help you learn more about careers that interest you.

I like Farhan’s suggestion to set-up an informational interview. I’ve done this myself, at different times in my career, just to learn more about someone else’s job. It can also help you decide what you might like or not like about a particular job.

And Joseph’s suggestion to start networking. Any time is a good time to transform your future career search and start building your network of mentors, advocates and sponsors who can help you achieve your goals.

Many companies, like AT&T, also have development programs for new talent as well as internship opportunities. Check out the helpful links below.

Best wishes to you in your education and career goals.

Melisa recommends the following next steps:

Indeed.com - https://www.indeed.com/q-undergrad-jobs.html
With your interest in engineering and mathematics, have you also considered a job in environmental sustainability? Check out https://www.trade-schools.net/articles/environmental-sustaintainability-jobs
Take a look at these helpful resources and more information on internships, development programs and life at AT&T. https://www.att.jobs/students/
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Richard’s Answer

Absolutely. The only bump was with Covid, and it delayed some Spring 2020 candidates to Jan. I know that the Dec 2020 graduates in engineering are getting multiple offers and offering remote work until we get back to normal. Engineering is a good career. Study hard and you will do fine.
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Simeon’s Answer

It can be hard sometimes to find a job if you haven't networked well before getting out of university. Go to recruiting events, socialize, and try to land an internship if you can!
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Michael’s Answer

Hi Petunie, it is a great question as to what jobs are available immediately after undergraduate graduation. I do not think you can go wrong with a degree in mathematics as it allows for many career options including those in data science, which is one of the hottest job areas at the moment. I work on a data science team where we hire individuals with degrees in mathematics, statistics and computer science to develop statistical models that support business applications. If you decide to go the mathematics route, maybe also consider a minor in computer science or statistics. Good luck!
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Brayden’s Answer

Hello. You ask a great question given the times were are in. Either of these degrees (mathematics or chemical engineering) give you the necessary skills to find a job once you are finished. If you are really feeling up to it, double majoring in engineering and mathematics is something that's not out of the ordinary. I know at the school I attend where I'm a mechanical engineer you need 1 additional upper division math course for a minor in math and 5 more upper division math courses to get the double major. While it might be challenging its not impossible.

With both degrees there's a ton of demand for both. With the math major a lot of companies are starting to use them in element analysis and making decisions based on probability so its definitely in demand. With the chemical engineering degree you really cant go wrong. That curriculum is one the more difficult ones when compared to other engineering disciplines so finding a job wont be difficult. Hope this was helpful. Good luck!
Thank you so much for the response! Petunie T.
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Karol’s Answer

Yes, there are very good job opportunities after undergrad. Just by having a undergrad degree you already have an advantage compared to other people, now a days education is very important and business are looking more and more for candidates that completed their undergraduate education. I definitely, recommend for you to go and complete undergrad; it might not be as easy at first to find a job but when you get one it will be the beginning of your career which gets better with time as you acquire more experience.
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Irene’s Answer

Yes! Absolutely there are excellent jobs available after undergrad. As some people have already said in this thread, college career fairs are a great way to talk to recruiters from many companies. Also, your college career center, and college advisor will be able to guide you well. I have a personal experience with a type of program that is fairly common at bigger companies that I want to share:

When I was done with college, I was fortunate enough to be accepted into a "Leadership Development Program" (LDP). These programs usually last 2-4 years and are very unique in that they let you rotate through various branches of the business every 6-12 months. My company has an LDP for many departments, such as Engineering, Finance, Human Resources, Supply Chain, and IT. LDPs let you gain a great understanding of many aspects of the business, and often set you up on the path to become a people leader at the company. You can usually find these programs from the "Careers" page of company websites. Although an LDP typically is geared towards setting graduates on a path towards a management track, many people end up finishing an LDP to become valued individual contributors at their company, too.

It's a great way to fine-tune your business acumen, communication/problem solving soft skills, and technical skills in the industry that you choose. These skills will be very valued if you choose to explore other career paths later on, too.
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