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What is the difference between having your bachelors and masters in nursing?

I am a 17 year old senior. I know that I want to be a nurse, but I do not know what the difference between getting my bachelors and having a masters degree. I know that having a master's degree I get payed more, but I want to know exactly what is different in the work load. #nursing #degree #majors #masters #bachelor

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Stephani’s Answer

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There is a big difference. I currently have my bachelors,but am working and almost done with my masters. I would suggest getting your BSN straight through, as many areas are now trying to hire mainly BSN nurses (especially in cities) and phasing out diploma and ADN programs. Getting your masters has you focus more on theory, abstract ideas, and performance improvement issues that nurses face. I am in a nursing education track, so I am learning about curriculum design, online learning, research, and publication. You could also take the track that leads you to Nurse Practitioner (which by next year will require a Doctorate) or leadership for management among other options. If you want a Master's, my recommendation is to work as a BSN floor nurse initially while you are working on the degree. It is very hard to lead, teach, or be in charge of someone's life and medical decisions if you have never worked on a nursing unit. Most of what we end up learning is on the job, and is always changing, and many nurses don't want to be told what to do by someone who has no actual experience doing it. By getting a Master's, you learn how to be sure you and your facility are providing optimum care, and how to do this professionally. It opens many doors, and shows that you are committed to nursing as a career.
The work load is different depending on what you do with the degree. Staff education usually means that you train other nurses, teach clinical groups, or create plans to make sure your facility is up to date on the latest evidence-based practice. If you work as a floor nurse with your master's, the pay might not be significantly higher, depending on what kind of unit you chose, and a leadership track would put you into management, so again, it depends on what you end up going with. When I first started, I thought I would never want to go back, then I thought i would like to be an NP, and then after working for a couple years, I decided that education was the route for me, another reason why I recommend working for a while before you officially decide. It gives you a better ideas of what you would be good at and definitely more confidence doing it. If I can answer any more questions let me know!

Thank you comment icon Do you think it is better to go for a higher degree from the very start? MiKayla
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