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What are some steps one can take to chose a career path? I know people always say to do something what you like but through my years at high school I had to cut off everything that I once loved to focus on my studies and because of this I don't have a hobby nor a passion. The only thing I know how to do is study

need help asap high-school

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Karla’s Answer

Oh my goodness girl, the struggle is real! I saw so much of myself when reading your question, it is not your fault and you’re not alone. High school can be a place where adults push you towards some destination without allowing you to fully understand why. I remember almost every single grade I got or extra-curricular I did in high school was focused on beefing up my college resume. I was book smart but was so naive to how to use that knowledge in the real world. My life’s goal was to “get into a good college” not “get to know yourself and what you like and don’t like”. Reflecting back now, it is tough to fully know yourself that young before you go to college. You will likely be getting to know yourself the most from Age 15-25, well into your 20’s really. Asking these types of questions though, before you go to college is so great!

Luckily, if you choose to go through college… you have some time to “soul search” and figure out what you like. It may seem like everyone else has got it figured out, but I promise you they don’t. If you are not sure what you like, maybe start with what you’re good at. Are there any particular subjects that you naturally pick up the material in or find the learning very interesting? I would start there and then look into different industries that fall within that area. Once in college, the best taste of the real world are summer internships. I can’t recommend internships enough. If you think you want to try out a certain industry – try very hard to research the best internships in that industry and beef up your resume to get those. Real world experience is invaluable for you and for employers. In an internship, you get to experience what that job would really look like post-college and decide if it’s for you. And employers would rather see an internship on your resume than just someone who did 4 years of college with no experience anywhere else.

Also, if you still don’t have a clue where to start. Sometimes personality tests can be interesting indicators of what type of role you would like to work in long term. Don’t take the career recommendations given by these assessments totally to heart though, they may try to put you in a bucket that doesn’t fit for you and the lifestyle you want to live.

Best of luck! The world is full of opportunities. You will go far as long as you take the time to reflect and decide what is best for you!

Love your authenticity and advice here Karla! Jordan Rivera COACH

thank you so much jennel J.

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Jennifer’s Answer

Hi Jennel,
It can definitely be frustrating when you realize school and academics has taken up much of your time. I recommend giving yourself a break, like on a weekend, to destress and give yourself the time to explore different areas of interests/hobbies. Maybe there was a hobby that always intrigued you, but you pushed it off because you wanted to focus on school. Maybe you used to do things as a kid but stopped because of school as well. At the same time, if you can't think of anything off the top of your head, try something random or go out of your comfort zone! You can also try this in school through extracurriculars. There might be a club out there that you haven't thought of trying, but once you try it, you might find yourself really liking it. You can also just let yourself relax and watch an entertaining show/movie or two and you never know, you might find yourself inspired by what you watch. It can definitely be hard to pick a career, but with that said, keep in mind that you are still in high school and that college will give you even more opportunities to search for what you might be interested in :) Good luck!

thank you so much jennel J.

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K’s Answer

Hi Jennel, It's really smart of you to have identified where you invested your time and energy and that, upon reflection, you realized you cut off a lot of things to focus academically. My daughter was really active in several school clubs and also took rigorous academics, but realized at the end of four years, that she hadn't had the social life she wanted. So I can kind of understand where you're coming from on this. And there's nothing wrong with having really great study skills. That's a lifelong skill that will help you in college if you so choose, your future work, and even relationships. Those are skills that translate into many things: attention to detail, concentration/focus, perseverance, dedication and organization. You'll always find value in those skills. As far as finding something extracurricular, take some time to notice what you like...what do you gravitate toward when you choose a movie, book or TV show? What types of Instagram photos, followers or Tik Toks do you like? Do any of them spark some interest or curiosity? Don't think "I can't do that, I don't know how." Don't limit yourself if you find something you like. Reach out to others who have pursued the same interest and ask them how they got started. Google for volunteering opportunities that might be related. It might take you a bit to find something you love and/or you might chnage that path many times. that's okay! It's all about finding yourself and what makes you happy. Best wishes!

thank you so much jennel J.

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Caroline’s Answer

Hi Jennel! What you like about your studies is likely a really big indicator of what you'll like to do in a job! Do you enjoy Math? Science? Writing? And, why do you enjoy them? For example, if you enjoy writing, do you enjoy the research associated with writing? If so, journalism or research fields might be a good choice! Or, do you enjoy writing because you can be creative? If so, consider careers in the arts or even teaching.

I encourage you to spend the next week paying attention to which of your classes you enjoy and WHY. Then, come back to this site and ask a new question ... "I enjoy my class in X ... what job would I enjoy?"

Looking forward to seeing your next post!

Caroline recommends the following next steps:

Take a week paying attention to what you enjoy - classwork, sports, extracurriculars ... and WHY you enjoy it.

thank you so much jennel J.

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Sarah’s Answer

Hi Jennel, consider how you can leverage what you know to be true about yourself and what has propelled you this far. Consider if a career focused on helping others, development, higher education would be of interest to you. Also consider what motivated you throughout school because those motivating factors are a great way to think about future jobs or career opportunities. A wise mentor of mine has always said that if you know what motivates you, you seek opportunities that need your needs.

thank you so much jennel J.

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Jim’s Answer

It's never too soon to take a step back an reassess where you've been and where you're going. If you have already gotten to a point where all you do is school and you've dropped things that make you happy, I think you need to reassess. Make time and find a way to get back to doing something you enjoy. Make as much of a priority as school. Having that balance will be vital now and as you progress.

On another note, a lot of people suggest doing something you love. They're right. Make it happen. You can. I spent thirty years in a career that just happened. I don't love it and am changing my life at fifty three to do something else. Don't settle. Do what you want to do. Do what you love. There are no real excuses not to. Sometimes we are our own biggest obstacle.
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Sarah’s Answer

Hi Jennel,

This is a great question to ask yourself and realistically speaking, finding your true passions may be more of a journey throughout your lifetime. Check out the below link to the ‘Purpose Venn Diagram.’ This can help guide your thinking and helps you to look at full picture holistically. http://www.humanbusiness.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Purpose-Venn-Diagram.png

thank you so much jennel J.

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Molly’s Answer

I have been in my career for nearly 15 years, and I'm still not sure I know what my career passions are. I would encourage you not to put too much pressure on yourself to know the perfect answer. College can be a time for exploration. Most schools will have you focus on core curriculum coursework for the first couple of semesters, with just a few courses related to your major. If you have already tested out of many of the core courses due to AP classes, then take the time to take some other general courses that are open to people outside of specific majors. If you cannot decide on something specific then major in something that will allow you to develop strong critical thinking skills.

As a hiring manager, I rarely look at people's majors when hiring. Instead I focus on how well people have taken advantage of opportunities presented to them and on how well they present themselves during the interview.

Finally, take some time to have some fun. It's okay if your path is not a perfectly straight line!

thank you so much jennel J.

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Warren’s Answer

Here are some steps to chose a career path:

• Pause
• Grab a journal
• Ask yourself 'what do i do well?'
• Ask yourself 'what else can pique my interest or challenge me?'
• Ask yourself 'who else is doing what I enjoy?'
• Skim through various magazines from different industries such as Forbes, Science, New York Magazine, Black Enterprise, Time, Entrepreneur, Town & Country, Cosmopolitan, Ebony, Reader's Digest, etc


Reason:
Seeing what industries are out there and what other people are doing may spark something to drive a new interest or reopen something within that may have previously been closed.
Inspiration can be found in many places and sometimes this discovery will bring you transferrable skills (research, troubleshooting, networking, public speaking, active listening, teamwork, independent work) that will ultimately lead to a career that will provide for you and your loved ones.

Thank you for asking the question!
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Simeon’s Answer

In general, I would go to the department of labor's website (https://www.dol.gov/) and see which fields are growing quickly these days. If you're drawing a blank on what you'd like to do, see if any of the fast growing fields call out to you. This will give you a lot more structure than trying to get a vague sense of your passions and trying to brainstorm a way to turn it into money. Most people don't have a passion that they are aware of right away. Also, passions tend to change from season to season. Lastly, look at videos on YouTube of people in their careers talking about what they love and hate. See if any of their descriptions sound like a good fit for you. It's just as important to figure out if you can deal with the downsides of a job as it is to figure out what you'd love about a job.

thank you so much jennel J.

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