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What college courses should I take to ensure I am ready for my career?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Donna’s Answer

Aniah;
You have been gaining the tools to step into your given career field through your entire college experience. Making life choices in the classes you enrolled in, the schedule you set for yourself, and completion of assignments. To work a part time job or not while you were in college. All of these prepared you for your next step in your career.

Now it is time to put a resume together and gather all the tools in your shed. Have the confidence that I know is in you and step out there for the first, second, and third interview. Trust me the first few are going to be a struggle and you will leave kicking yourself. Why didn't I say this or What would have been a better answer to that question.

I don't know if they are still asking these questions, but be prepared to describe a significant accomplishment in your life. Along with a significant failure. Being right out of college with no experience is also going to be a frustration, but stick with it. Maybe to build your confidence see if any businesses in your field offer internships or new hire type programs. A few years back the company I work for hired a group of college graduates and they worked in various positions in the company for one year. It was a three year program and they had to be willing to transfer to various states based on needs of the business. In the end they were allowed to choose which organization they wanted to work in.

You have this. I have the utmost faith in your success. Go find that niche in society that makes you HAPPY!
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Peregrin’s Answer

The other answers all have great points in them, so be sure to read through and I'll sure you'll find some great themes.

As noted elsewhere, what you want to do as a career is an important point for identifying courses. If you don't know what that is at this point, it is a great time to explore what careers might be like by checking out different courses. One of the big reason there are general requirements at colleges is to provide that "well rounded" education and some exposure to other areas that might be of interest.

I will say, having worked in both a technical and non-technical career, that some qualities that any job and any company will value are Critical Thinking, Analysis, Problem Solving, and good Writing skills. Most liberal arts courses will give you opportunities to hone your writing skills. Don't think of that as some sort of chore, it is an incredibly important skill and critical, particularly as the workforce becomes more remote from each other to have a good ability to communicate in written form. Problem Solving and Critical Thinking are important in whatever career you choose, as you are almost always going to be in a position where you are expected to identify and solve or analyze the work you are presented with. Even if you were to go into a career that is well defined and more of doing the same thing, over and over again, there will still be opportunities to understand a customer's problem or identify areas where that work could be done more efficiently or in a better environment.

Enjoy college, explore, try new things. The skills above will always benefit you in any career.
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Tania’s Answer

One of the best career-building tactics I used was to be diverse. Throughout high school & university I applied for jobs through recruiting agencies. Every year I was given a job in a different industry. In my opinion, if you can acquire multiple skills and/or understanding of different roles, this will allow you to become innovative in taking that experience and applying the learning to different situations. If you can show that you are able to learn, understand, apply and innovative, those are the skills that allowed me to find the career of my choice. As you find things you are passionate about, dig deeper and try to become a subject matter expert. The other benefit to this is employment stability. You're not relying on one sector to be successful in. If one causes a roadblock, you have other avenues to tie you over if necessary should things go south with the economy. As others mentioned, there are definitely skills that transcend positions and industries.
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Rebecca’s Answer

It really depends on what career you would like to proceed. E.g. if you would like to start your career in some professionals like medical, legal, engineering, etc. you may need to take the relevant courses in the college and work in the industry for a few year before you can obtain the professional qualification.
However, if you would like to start your own business, you may consider to study business or relevant subject of the industry.
First of all, you may need to determine what you would like to do in the future first. You can do more research online and speak to more people and then shortlist a few industry you are interested on. Then, you can check which college offer the relevant course and the entry requirement.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Lauren’s Answer

Hi Aniah,
Great question! I think you can definitely tailor your college courses around the area you would like to specialize in post-grad. However, I believe that your courses really only give you the technical and foundational knowledge needed. For example, when I was in college I knew that I wanted to work in forensic accounting post-grad so I had majored in accounting, while minoring in political science and criminal justice. These areas that I tailored my education towards allowed me to gain the knowledge and understand needed for my field. Granted, I think that the hands-on experiences and opportunities you can gain in your profession prior to graduating will definitely offer an advantage. For example, job shadowing, volunteering, and internships could provide you with insights into how you can better prepare yourself and even what to expect when working in your profession post-grad. Additionally, consider joining professional organizations as a student member and even creating a LinkedIn because all of the networking opportunities you can capitalize on now will assist you moving forward as you begin your career.
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Brandon’s Answer

That is a difficult to say. In school you typically have a vague idea of what you would want to study and take classes based on that. For example in business related degrees you would sometimes need to achieve a specific level of math in order to get the degree. While in other cases for a degree in English, you may not need to take the math course. So choosing the right classes generally depends on the work you want to go into. Now, that being said, there are good ways to find out whether a specific career path would be good for you. The first thing to do is ask your advisor/counselor about a degree that you are interested in or if you are unsure in what you want to do. Typically they can give resources that can guide someone to a profession they may like. Another option is to try to find any kind of volunteer or internship that relates to the career that you may want to do. This will allow you to see firsthand the amount of work that needs to be done in order to do that kind of job. While you are there ask the professionals there opinion of the work. They will be able to give you great advice on what to do next.
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Theodore’s Answer

Okay your career and what you study for are not usually one to one. School gives you technical knowledge and can broaden your perspectives but it isn't a garenty that you can find a class that will perfectly transition you into the job you might want. Explore a bit, you have time but what really Helps is experience. My advice if you have an idea of what you want to do, get some volunteer work, or an internship while your still in college. Use it to find out what your skill set is, if your good at what you do and discover what you may need to work on. Then build your classes accordingly to fill the gaps.
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