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What is it like to be a cardiothoracic surgeon? What is you daily life like? Does your job interfere with your personal life? What are some setbacks in becoming a surgeon?

I don't know much about cardiothoracic surgeons and I want to get an idea about their daily life. #medicine #science #surgery #cardiac-surgeon

Thank you comment icon Hey Leriz! Great questions, but I'm sure you'll get more input from professionals if each of these questions were posted as separate question posts on the site. Can you go in and edit your question to reflect just one, and then separate each of your other questions out into new question posts? Once you've done that, we'll do our best to get each of them answered by the pros!! Lindsey Manning-Djabbari

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Richard’s Answer

DAILY LIFE FOR A SURGEON
Clinic: Evaluate patients prior to surgery. Explain the options including alternative to surgery. Follow up with patients after surgery looking for possible complications.
OR: Perform the surgery with a team including scrub techs, nurses and anesthesiologists.
Rounds: Evaluate patients who are admitted to the hospital before and after surgery.
ER: take calls from ER doctors who are consulting for possible surgical admission.


During medical school and residency, you won’t be in control of your own schedule which makes family time difficult to obtain. However, after training, you can be in more control and can choose what practice to join based on your needs. You can work less and have more time for family at the cost of making less money and possibly consulting on less interesting cases.
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Aijaz’s Answer

Those who practice in the cardiothoracic surgical specialty find that it is interesting, challenging, and rewarding because it offers a great deal of professional and personal satisfaction. It may be undertaken in a number of different private practice or academic settings. It is a technically demanding specialty that is constantly evolving with new procedures, new approaches, and improving results. In addition to the joy and privilege of caring for others, there are multiple opportunities to participate in teaching and the dissemination of knowledge concerning cardiothoracic disorders and their management. Although much is known in this rapidly evolving field, there are numerous opportunities for the discovery of new knowledge concerning cardiothoracic disease. Cardiothoracic surgeons consistently place themselves in the forefront of research efforts concerning prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various cardiothoracic abnormalities


A student considering a career in surgery may only consider the advantages of the job. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects employment opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase 18 percent between 2012 and 2022, faster than the average of all careers. Surgeons also have much higher earnings than many other professions. However, in spite of the availability of jobs and the high incomes, a career as a surgeon has some disadvantages.


Length of Education


A surgeon needs years of post-secondary education before practicing. A physician needs at least three years of undergraduate studies and four years of medical school, though typically this education takes eight years. Following successful completion of the medical licensing exam, a medical school graduate must complete an internship plus years of residency. The length of time a surgeon spends in residency and internship programs depends upon the specialization.


Cost of Education


The cost of a surgeon's education can be excessive. On average, indebted 2013 med school graduates owed $169,901 at graduation, and 7 percent owed $300,000 or more, according to the Association of American Medical colleges. The average cost of medical school for tuition and fees for the 2013 to 2014 school year was $32,993 in public colleges and $52,456 in private ones. Even with scholarships and financial aid, the debt a surgeon has after graduation can give pause to some considering a career in surgery.


Life and Death Responsibility


As a surgeon, you literally hold a person's life in your hands, and mistakes can kill your patients. This responsibility can be too much for some surgeons. Depending on their specialty, surgeons work long, demanding hours, according to the University of California's School of Medicine. The physical and emotional requirements of their careers can lead to a surgeon changing his specialty before retirement. Changing your specialty can require additional time in residency and internship programs.


Risk of Injury


Surgeons work with many sharp objects, including needles and scalpels. They are at risk of injury and exposure to infectious diseases if they receive a cut or needle stick. Exposure to airborne pathogens is a risk to anyone involved in surgery, but the surgeon's exposure is particularly high because he works directly over the patient. Even though all hospitals and surgery centers have safety standards in place, accidents can place a surgeon at risk.

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