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Does STEM extend to Logistics/Supply chain management?

I am interested in the the design and management of work-flow. #management #logistics #supply-chain


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Rachel’s Answer

You will need to focus on stress and time management. In order to manage stress you have to manage your time wisely. <span style="background-color: transparent;">You have to set a routine for yourself and stick to it for the most part. Once you get into the groove of a routine it will be much easier for you to manage your time and have enough time for everything you need to do (including relaxing). Make yourself to-do lists on a weekly basis, use Google calendar or a planner to keep track of events, deadlines, and due dates. In addition to setting a routine and sticking to it, plan out relaxing activities into your day. Or set aside a time, after everything is done for the day, that you can have "me" time. I have also personally found it essential to not only find time for myself but also make use of that time in a way that is best for me and my holistic wellness. I have found the HeadSpace app to be an essential tool in helping me relax and generally feel more relaxed throughout the day, Guided meditation, even if you have a busy schedule, will make you feel more at ease and relaxed throughout the day as a whole (not just when you have the time to relax and focus on that "me" time).</span>

<span style="background-color: transparent;">Set a routine.Use Google Calendar.Set aside Me TimeWrite weekly to-do lists and use a planner.Find a peaceful and restful activity that will help you feel relaxed.</span>




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Steve’s Answer

Hi there,

STEM is a widely used acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math as you may know. Looking at these important areas you will find a related match to Supply Chain (Procurement). Today, many supply chain professionals use "Category Management" to help them manage pockets of spend (IT, Consulting, Travel, Professional Services, Telecom and others) to improve methods of the buy while increasing savings for those buys.

Be sure to look at other coursework that ISM chapters can provide in your local area, and also take advantage of training that your own company may offer you. Get on a Category Team and work the various aspects of supply chain management which will include Planning, Strategy Sourcing, and Performance for your important stakeholder engagement. Key that stakeholders engage with Supply Chain early and often in order to maximise savings potential while reducing any risks.


Have fun and learn where you can. Knowledge is Power!


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Lindsay’s Answer

Hi Kelly. Absolutely!! STEM is a widely used acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science,_technology,_engineering,_and_mathematics


With this broad definition, you can focus course work, studies and career on STEM-related supply chain careers, such as manufacturing engineering (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manufacturing_engineering) or industrial engineering (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_engineering). Additionally, logistics and supply chain requires detailed analysis of aspects like forecasting, inventory management, lead time management... all of which have heavy emphasis on mathematics and modeling. There are many more STEM-related fields that play into supply chain. I recommend taking a look at those wikipedia pages as a starting point.


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Terrence’s Answer

Hi Kelly! STEM plays an important role in the advancement of Supply Chain Management. Operations Research Analyst which be a good role to look into. There are also a number of roles that seek individuals with big data analytics backgrounds and education.

Here is what I found on Operations Research Analyst from https://careerinstem.com/product/operations-research-analyst/

“Operations research analysts are problem solvers who use mathematics to help businesses and organizations grow and improve. They use advanced techniques such as optimization, data extraction, statistical analysis and mathematical modeling to find ways in which companies can be rationalized and be more effective.”

Process Improvement, Operational Excellence, Industrial Engineer, and Quality Managers fall into the STEM realm. All of those have a strong foundation in statistics.

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Grace’s Answer

Hello, Kelly. STEM does absolutely extend to Logistics and Supply Chain. In a world where technology is advancing at an unprecedented rate, companies need people with technical backgrounds and STEM based experience to help design, and optimize their Supply Chains. There are many inputs and outputs to the Supply Chain and people with STEM backgrounds and passion for process flow design can typically apply various analytical insights and environmental dependencies to help optimize solutions.

Take a look at this article from a trusted Supply Chain network that discusses the need for STEM talent in Supply Chain fields.
http://www.apics.org/about/overview/apics-news-detail/2017/06/13/supply-chain-stem

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Hallie’s Answer

Hi Kelly,
Yes, STEM certainly extends to logistics/supply chain management, and I've found from personal experience that there is a lot of overlap in the analytical mindset that is valuable in both fields of study.
I studied biomedical engineering undergrad, and have now found that I've moved into a supply chain role at a pharmaceutical company. I found that getting my APICS CPIM (Certified in Production and Inventory Management) certification has helped me build upon my basis of my engineering degree, and deepen my understanding of the end-to-end supply chain. I would definitely recommend looking to get that certification if logistics/supply chain management is an area you are interested in - it is highly-regarded across industries, and is a really great learning tool.

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Hallie’s Answer

Hi Kelly,
Yes, STEM certainly extends to logistics/supply chain management, and I've found from personal experience that there is a lot of overlap in the analytical mindset that is valuable in both fields of study.
I studied biomedical engineering undergrad, and have now found that I've moved into a supply chain role at a pharmaceutical company. I found that getting my APICS CPIM (Certified in Production and Inventory Management) certification has helped me build upon my basis of my engineering degree, and deepen my understanding of the end-to-end supply chain. I would definitely recommend looking to get that certification if logistics/supply chain management is an area you are interested in - it is highly-regarded across industries, and is a really great learning tool.

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