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When figuring out a way in creating/fixing something in college is it best to work with a partner or to work alone?

I tend to work best alone but i would like to know weather it is best to work with a partner in college or if it doesn't really matter. #computer-science #engineering #mechanical-engineering #electrical-engineering


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Joanne’s Answer

One of the hardest things I had to learn while going to college was asking for help.


I graduated in the top 1% of my high school class and about half way through my freshman year, it dawned on me that asking for help wasn't a sign of weakness. It was crucial to surviving those 'weed-out' classes.


As for individual vs. group, pick the option you like. I've always preferred individual over group because you control your own destiny. (You'll see how people have different approaches towards classwork). However, in the real world, you rarely work alone, so a little group practice and learning about human interactions may not hurt.


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Simon’s Answer

A combination is best, so practice working as a team when the opportunity presents itself. There will be a time when you will have to master both. Keep in mind that when you work alone you have a very limited view and approach. I recommend that you discuss your project/solution with someone else to get input on your project. Good luck.


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Eric’s Answer

In my experience, it's best to work in the way that you are most productive. For some people, that is in a group, for others, with a single partner, and for still others (like me), working alone.


That being said, there are many phases to work. While I do concentrated coding, for example, best alone, I tend to be a lot more successful if I think up an idea on my own, go to one or more people and bounce the idea around a bit, thinking about approaches and possible pitfalls, and then go back to actually make it on my own.


Also, don't underestimate the value of talking to someone if you get stuck. Often the act of explaining it will make the problem be clear. I have lost count of the times that a coworker has called me over to ask for help with a problem, explained their problem, and then figured out the solution, without me saying anything. And I have done the same to them, many times.


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Michael’s Answer

Teamwork is normally the answer. Study groups in STEM programs are the key to understanding the content. Find other students whom you see that comprehend the material and become friends. Going at it 'alone' in a STEM program is difficult and compromises the learning environment. In the professional workplace, you never hear of a company that hires individuals who don't problem-solve in groups.


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