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Business as a career

Do MBAs from highly notable universities like Stanford , Harvard , etc . add to the salaries you get .
Also , can they help in better promotions alongside your hardwork? business college

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Karthik’s Answer

Promotions in the corporate world are largely dependent on the actual accomplishments of an individual on the job, his/her capabilities/skills etc. MBA's degrees from reputed institutes helps one develop/hone relevant skills needed to manage/run a company/business. So, that way an MBA degree would help a person to grow in his/her career. Studying at a reputed university gives one a broad exposure to diverse set of students, world-class faculty, challenging/latest projects in relevant areas. In general there immense opportunities to realize one’s full potential that’s hard to find elsewhere. During the course, one may get opportunities to do internships at good companies/start-ups. Such universities have a strong industry/alumni connection and at the end of the course the probability of landing up in your dream job is high as part of the campus placements.

That said, in the long run just a degree will not aid in sustaining or even maintaining career growth may it be in terms of higher job roles or salaries. The Degrees will certainly give one the much needed head start in the career graph, but ultimately it’s the individual's hard work, intellect, skills and overall personality that can sustain/enhance it.
thankyou very much DD M.
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Sophia’s Answer

There is no specific answer for this however, it is a combination of your education and the experiences you have had professional in a workplace. Promotions are more focused on the work you have accomplished in the job itself, however, some employers will give a promotion once you have completed your MBA. It always depends on the place you work how their budget/process is. My advise is to pursue higher education and do well professionally in the workplace and it will all fall into place. When you are interview and get offered a new role, for example, you can also leverage your higher education when finalizing what your base salary will be. Work hard and it will all come to you in due time!
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Lena’s Answer

A few things to consider when applying to MBA programs:
1. Evaluating where you are in life in relation to when you are completing your MBA
- Do you have available time to be a full time student or is a part-time program more feasible?
2. Where do you want to be after the program?
- Can it be done without going back to school?
- Are you looking to advance your career within the same industry or jump to another one?
3. Can you afford it/return on investment?
- An MBA will most likely result in a higher salary - will the cost of school be worth it for this increase?
- Full-time/part-time cost of attendance
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Ruben’s Answer

At the beginning of your career, during the entry-level process, most employers may use the university you attended as a filter or qualifier but as you develop within your role and gain additional experience the place where you went to school becomes less relevant. Employers rate experienced professionals based on their corporate achievements and not necessarily on the provenance of their degree.

Any degree or certification comes with a cost that should be taken into consideration when deciding whether or not to pursue it and from which institution. At times a degree from a costly institution may not guarantee a high paying job. This is important to consider if you're planning to take on debt to cover your tuition and fees.
thankyou very much DD M.
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Greg’s Answer

Where you get your degree is very important getting started, but after that, I find that it is more about who you meet while you are working that can help elevate you in the future.
thankyou very much DD M.
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Stephanie’s Answer

Where your MBA is from is important but it certainly isn't the end all be all. If you obtain an MBA and can't adequately contribute to a team, it will be meaningless so focus on the program and what your goals are just as much as the school's prestige when weighing your decision.
If your question is whether or not to bother with it if you can't get into a top 10 program, then you might want to rethink your motivations.
thankyou very much DD M.
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Ryan’s Answer

Hi DD M,

In my experience, the simple answer is that there isn't a steadfast rule here. I have found the skills, work ethic, and personal references are typically the most valuable. When it comes to something like an MBA, it can make the difference in getting an edge in a job in a competitive market. Partly because it builds your experience and partly because of its value in general. That said, if you have job experience, have worked your way up, and go the route of specialized certificate programs from similar universities, you can get the same impact.

Long story short, there is no simple answer or one way. Whatever path you take, learn as much as you can, work as hard as you can, and perform well, and you will see the desired results.

Best of luck!

Ryan
thankyou very much DD M.
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Scott’s Answer

I generally agree with the posts. You determine the course of your career more than any other factor. I also agree with earn the best degree you are capable of. However, unless you are applying to a blue chip company, be ready for education bias. Typically, "bigshot MBA from Stanford"... type thing. I have seen it many times over and it is very common. Keep in mind, most managers do not have degrees from schools like these. Again, generally speaking, as an executive once a candidate hits their 30's, I am looking at their body of work more than any other criteria. What impresses me more is after an employee is on board, if they take the initiative to continue their education with certifications (or applicable in your field) which tells me they are a student of the business. Learning cannot stop at college is my point. Stay current in your field and demonstrate it to your management. That will help you significantly. Remember, career advancing is not one silver bullet. The promotion process takes into account many factors and education is significant along with your performance, your people skills etc. All of it is cumulative however to build your personal brand. Good luck.
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Chiranjib’s Answer

Well, this is a good question.

MBA from reputed universities will be very helpful if you are doing such degrees as part of full-time studies. If you have the time and caliber, please go for it!

But if you are working and do not intend to leave your job, yet wish to get a degree from such reputed places, please do a proper ROI (return on investment) calculation before investing in it.

If you are already working, the most important question to ask yourself is -
Why do you wish to get an MBA degree now? (Very important question!)
a) Is it just to get a promotion at work?
b) Or do you wish to leave the existing organization and get a new role elsewhere?
c) You wish to learn more about ways to manage so that it helps you in your upcoming role?

If a) is correct, then just doing an MBA may not work. If that is what you intend to do, please have a candid conversation with your manager. Please let him know very clearly that you wish to go for an MBA and that, you are hoping to apply the skills in a suitable role once you complete it. That will give him an idea of your plans and will set the right expectations. At the end of the day, the degree is not just a paper, it needs to translate to capability and value that you bring to the table for an organization. But even after that, I have seen many instances, where not much have changed for the candidate even after.

If b) is correct, then you have to check for the kind of placement opportunities that the course provider is providing. Upgrad has some courses with supposed placement opportunities. Though they do not have courses from Harvard or Stanford yet, they do have some good institutions that they have collaborated with.

If c) is correct, you can even go for short-term credit or non-credit courses. Think of it as plugging the gaps in your skills. Lots of platforms provide these courses, like LinkedIn Learning, Coursera, EdX, etc. to name a few. The courses are experiential in nature, often come with graded assignments, and will help you to cross-skill and upskill quickly on focussed areas.

By the way, I forgot to mention, the universities you mentioned hardly provide MBA degrees for working professionals, they usually provide some credit or non-credit courses, typically in MOOC format. Off late Coursera and EdX have introduced master's degrees and masters track certificates / micromasters that charge you way lesser than a full-time MBA degree. I have seen people take those courses. You can think of those too if you want. But remember what I said in a) as EdX and Coursera do not provide placement opportunities yet. So, while it may look great on your CV, unless you can sell it, it will still be some investment with negligible returns.

So, ultimately the decision is yours. Do your research properly before you take the plunge!

All the best!
thankyou very much DD M.
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Graham’s Answer

When it comes to promotions, I believe your performance will have much more of an impact vs where you got your MBA. However, getting an MBA from an elite school such as Harvard or Stanford could help you get your foot in the door. It does not, however, guarantee success.
thankyou very much DD M.
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Carson’s Answer

I would recommend an MBA just to allow yourself to begin networking in a specific area of work. When it comes to promotions it is probably more based on your performance rather than previous education. You may receive a higher starting salary because of your MBA though. Would also recommend looking at what former MBA students from a specific university are doing now and possibly reaching out to them to begin those connections.
thankyou very much DD M.
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