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What are all the requirements to being a lawyer

Get a law degree, pass the bar exam.Actually you can pass it even without law school if you are a genius. Emina T.
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Ross’s Answer

It can vary by State, but https://www.findlaw.com/hirealawyer/choosing-the-right-lawyer/what-are-the-professional-requirements-for-becoming-a-lawyer.html is a good start

1. Bachelor's Degree
Anyone who wants to pursue a law degree must first complete a bachelor's degree program (or its equivalent). The type of undergraduate degree is less important, but often reflects the practice area considered. For example, someone who wants to go into patent law might first pursue a bachelor's degree in engineering.

After completing your bachelor's degree, you will need to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), which is one of several assessment tools used by law school admissions staff.

2. Law School
The next step is to graduate from or complete at least three years at a law school accredited by the American Bar Association, with slight variations from state to state. The California Bar Association, for example, requires graduation or the completion of at least four years of law school (non-accredited schools are included); four years of work in a judge's chambers program; or a study program combining those two educational methods. Vermont, Virginia, and Washington allow similar options, while New York requires at least one year of law school before completing an alternative form of legal education.

3. State Bar Exam
No matter how well you did in law school, you cannot legally practice law in a given state without passing that state's bar examination. Many attorneys have passed bar exams in several states, meaning they can practice law in each of those states.

4. Character and Fitness Review
Since the practice of law is such a high stakes endeavor, involving the finances and in some cases the freedom of clients, each state bar requires applicants to undergo moral character and fitness reviews. This review includes question about academic conduct at law school; criminal history; social conduct in general; any applicable disciplinary actions while you were in college or law school; and other inquiries intended to gauge your ethical makeup.

Passage of this review is a requirement for obtaining your state law license.

5. Oath
Prospective attorneys must take a legally binding oath that they will uphold the codes and the Constitution of the United States, as well as the laws and constitution of the licensing state.

6. License
Completion of the above requirements typically results in the individual receiving his or her law license from their state's supreme court or high-court equivalent (the Court of Appeals is New York's highest court, for example). However, please check with your state's bar association for the specific requirements for a law license.
I believe this is the most comprehensive comment. Notably, there is one state where you do not have to take a bar exam. That is Wisconsin. You would want to verify the school with the school and state bar before, but generally, if you go to law school in Wisconsin, you have "Diploma Privilege." This allows practicing law after obtaining your diploma from an approved Wisconsin law school without ever taking a bar exam. People who I graduated with from law school ended up all over the country, including some in Wisconsin. Kevin Rutan
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Lisa’s Answer

Raeshawnna,

In Michigan, you need a Bachelor's Degree (4 years) and then a JD from law school (another 3 years). After law school you need to take the bar exam in the state you want to practice in and pass that. I recommend taking a bar review course after you graduate from law school at least 2 months before you take the bar. While you are in high school, it is important to focus on getting good grades and being involved in school and community activities - such as Band, Spanish Club, Debate Team, bring food to elderly, donate time at a food bank or animal shelter, etc.. Colleges and law schools like well rounded individuals that are not only smart but involved in their communities.
Good Luck
Lisa
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Harold’s Answer

The best I know is you can talk any liberal arts courses. Courses can also help are English, Constitutional, Civil and Administrative law. Next then have to take the LSAT. I hear any law school will work. Not too many question where you went to law school.
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