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What is the most difficult part of being a college student?

In what ways are college different compared to high school, how exactly does college impact or change you?

#student #college #college-advice #college-bound

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angie’s Answer

Hello, Alex,

The answer for me is holding to my integrity. Colleges have a lot of offerings - parties, extra activities, sports, people, places, things....so much. And no parental guidance, siblings, or old friends to help keep you on track. So, it's up to you to be responsible for your schoolwork, eating healthy, exercising, sleeping enough, and studying for tests. It's a lot to ask of first-year students and many end up gaining weight, missing classes, wasting time, getting pregnant, drinking too much, failing, or dropping out.

So, I made a plan and I stuck to it. I had a friend who also wanted to really learn and be responsible, so we helped each other stay on track. We did party, but not a lot, we did miss some classes but we helped each other get back on the path we chose.

You can navigate this new stage of life with integrity and respect for yourself and others. It's wonderful!

Have fun and good luck!



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Christy’s Answer

Personally, I think that the most difficult part of being a college student is balancing a social life and an academic life. As important as it is to be academically vigilant, it is also important to have a social life and make friends and find a community when you are away from home. During COVID-19, I didn’t get to hang out with anyone because I didn’t know anyone and I was stuck at home, so I spent most of my time on my studies. When I got back in person, I followed the same academic schedule that I had during quarantine and soon enough I realized that the same schedule would not work anymore. I would definitely recommend spacing out your schedule and not overbooking yourself. Make time to go and get food, set 2 hours straight specifically for laundry, make time to exercise, make time to hang out with friends, make time for walking around campus and getting to places, make some time for yourself as well every day. If you don’t, you will find yourself eating one meal a day and getting about 3 hours of sleep, being unproductive, and unsatisfied. It is extremely important to maintain a balanced life.

Another thing about being a college student is that you have to figure out what your next meal is and when it is. When you’re at home, your next meal is in the kitchen. It may take approximately 5 minutes to get there. It may take about 8 minutes to grab your food, and if you're a fast eater, it may take you about 15 minutes to finish your food and then 5 minutes to go back to your room to go to class. In total, at home, it would take you about 30 to 40 minutes to complete an entire meal. While you’re on campus, you need to walk to the closest dining hall, depending on how far it is it may take you 10 to 15 minutes, you need to wait in line and swipe your ID or however your school does it (probably another 7 minutes), then to grab your food, you need to wait in line again (approximately 5 minutes per line), and then if you are a fast eater it may take you 15 minutes to finish your food, and it may take you 10 minutes to get back to your place. In total, you would have spent about an hour eating food on campus. And you need to figure out if you will be back on time for class. If you do not plan on eating on campus, you need to cook your own food (the cheaper option), which is more time-consuming than you think, and then meal-prep them. Or some people just doordash their food. My biggest advice is to space out your schedule!
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Samantha’s Answer

Hi Alex,
For me, the most difficult part is self motivation. College is all about learning to do your work because you want to. No one is gonna hold your hand and make sure you get everything done. Its a game of light a fire under you and making sure you are prepared for what's coming next. That being said, asking for help is definitely a part of that process . When you see something coming or you are struggling, reach out to faculty or staff in order to get the assistance you need.

Best :D
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Aaron’s Answer

Time management.

In many ways, college offers exponentially more freedom than high school. But with all this increased freedom, comes great responsibility. I would argue that time management was one of the trickiest things in my own personal transition from high school to college. In high school - your daily schedule was set and all your classes were relatively close to one another both physically and chronologically. With college, there are added factors of multiple buildings across a campus, odd schedules, transportation to and around campus, juggling a job between classes, knowing which assignments to prioritize and in which order.

I was certainly one to abandon all parental support and try to be fully independent as I entered college, and while I did learn a great many things about being an adult, I also have come to learn that asking for help is okay. It can be complicated and stressful when new things come into effect that alter your schedule and other responsibilities. Looking back on high school now, it seemed all too easy - the work was mostly done for you and you just had to move through your pre-planned days and pass your classes. College is truly the gateway to real-life responsibilities and choices. Good luck - there's plenty to learn in your days ahead!
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April’s Answer

I would say one of the most difficult things about college is the constant transition, developmentally and academically. You are switching in and out of classes, with different students, different professors, and different buildings. More than that, it’s the transition from kid to adult. Now you’re having to clean for yourself, grocery shop for yourself, cook for yourself, do your own laundry (and pay for it), live with complete strangers, develop new relationships, and maybe start paying a few bills. You do all of this while learning to manage your time in a way you’ve never done before.

You are constantly learning something new and these new insights have effects on the rest of your life. For example, learning how to live with strangers peacefully teaches you about other peoples cultures and also teaches you patience. Balancing classes and a job or internship teaches you time management and work ethic. Developing relationships with new people at college teaches you about interpersonal relationships and communication. Tuition isn’t free, but there are many important life lessons that college teaches you for free.

Absorb all that you can while you are there. It’s a unique experience and you will be better for it.
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Charlene’s Answer

Hello Alex,

College and high school are extremely different. The biggest difference is you are responsible for attending your classes and doing the work. The teacher or school is not going to call your parents to tell them you've missed the class, and your teacher is not going to hound you for your missing assignment. There is also balance or responsibility and freedom. You have to make the conscious decision between doing what you want to do and doing what you need to do, when you want to.

These things help mold you in who want to be. The independence to learn life skills that will carry you through adulthood. Embrace the challenges and learn all you can about life in college. When you matriculate in to "adulting", you will look back to "those were the days."
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