Skip to main content
5 answers
6
Asked 350 views Translate

how do you find out what careers you wanted to do?

#career-choice #career-counseling #career-path #career-paths #career

Thank you comment icon StrengthsFinder 2.0 by Don Clifton is a wonderful book to get your journey started. Amanda Iannuzzi
+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

5 answers


0
Updated Translate

Jesse W.’s Answer

One way to look at careers is categorically. What gives you energy? Do you like working with Data? People? Things?

Data - did you play video games and learned the cheats and ways to reprogram your app? Does it feel right to do this and you can spend hours looking for ways to hack your games or create apps? Do you organize everything? If so, accounting, ethical hacking, computer programming, database and data analytics might be fields you would pursue.

People - do you like people. When you go to a party or hang with a crowd, does this energize you or tire you out? If people energize you, sales, business, or coaching may be it. If you like helping people, careers in counseling, politics, emergecy services (EMT or Firefighter), or medical (nurse or doctor) may be it.

Things - are you a person who likes to tinker, likes to fix things, or do mechanical and electrical components seem easy to figure out? You might like engineering, or construction trades, HVAC, energy, or manufacturing. Do you like to be outdoor in the sun and elements?

Short answer is there are many ways to approach a career search. Most people happen into their career by succesive jobs and/or courses. Each of us can do all 3 categorues at least at some level of engagement. It is where you strength is, wgat energizes you, and what peaks your interests (things you like to do that energize you) that help you choose direction.

When you think you know, get some experience by working your network and doing some research (ask friends, family, and acquaintences). Earn some digital badges and certifications. Many employerswill pay for education and training for someone who has a good start.
0
0
Updated Translate

Paul’s Answer

Hi Marquis:

With me it came down to what my personal strengths were in, and where I felt I could make a difference in peoples lives. I knew for a long time, even when I was in high school, that I wanted to do something in the area of public service.

I imagine, Like a lot of people that I have communicated with, that you are getting lots of advice as to what you should do with your life. You might be told to go into a certain occupation because there is a lot of money in it, or there is a lot of demand for people in those occupations. As an advisor, I discovered that students who pursued occupations or careers for those reasons, eventually ended up quitting school, failing their courses, and never finishing.

If I were to make a recommendation, it would be to pursue a career which you enjoy, and which you can take advantage of your cognitive and personal strengths. Because if if you get into something that you love, eventually the money and prosperity will follow you.

In regards to what careers I chose, I had to determine what my strengths were. I was an excellent speaker and writer, I was dedicated and loyal, and worked well in a team environment. I also wanted to work with students and instructors, so the fact that I became an educator seemed to make sense. My writing skills also got me noticed by supervisors, and I became a writer for various campus publications and later set out on a freelance writer career.

So I would definitely do a self reflection, determine what your primary interests and strengths are. See where you can get the academic training and education, where you can develop and enhance those strengths, and see if there is a possible mentor in that career field that you can shadow, to see if that career is something that you would like to do. I hope this has been helpful in assisting your educational and career path.
Paul

Paul recommends the following next steps:

Do a self reflection and determine what your strengths are and what occupational areas you might be interested in
Seek out an advisor and determine what educational requirements or certification will be needed for this career
Do a job shadow, with an individual in that occupation to see what job activities are involved in that career
Seek out a mentor in that particular career
0
0
Updated Translate

Ceil’s Answer

If I could tell my young self one thing, it would be to stop worrying about what career to choose. You have no idea what's going to be interesting to you in 20 years, or what you're going to surprise yourself by being really good at. If you shut the doors early, you will let the truly satisfying life pass you by.

Instead, figure out what you enjoy doing and are good at now, without worrying about where it might take you. Love the energy of theater and the arts? You can go so many places with that interest - from writer to ticket-taker to stagehand to lighting professional to . . . Love sports, but sensible enough to know you aren't going to be on the field, or court, in any meaningful way? Sportswriter, marketing assistant, facilities manager, communications, IT specialist, analyst, . . .

Really love math, but totally do not want to be a high school teacher? Coding, research, statistician . . .

The key is to start from what you enjoy and grow outward from there.

Ceil recommends the following next steps:

List 3 things you enjoy - don't worry about whether they can lead to "careers" - anything can
Research each one and find out what kinds of work are covered in that umbrella - a search on "jobs in science" or "jobs in theater" can get you started
Send a note to someone you know who's part of the industry, or who might know someone is, and ask if you can talk to them about what it's like to work in that field
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the insight! I try to tell myself the same thing, "I'm not going to like the same thing later on" or "will I enjoy doing this in 5 years?" but sometimes it gets hard as hearing everybody else and their goals makes it feel like I'm behind. Marquis W.
0
0
Updated Translate

Anita’s Answer

There are many tools to assist with this. My favorite is https://careerquiz.org/.
0
0
Updated Translate

Emily’s Answer

Hi Marquis, my name is Emily and I'm currently a senior at Rutgers University. I also struggled with this throughout my college years! I thought I knew what I wanted to do in high school but as I gained more experience, I realized that I knew what I wanted to do. I think it's important to gain more experience in what interests you! Once you do that, you'll realize how passionate you are about certain interests.
0