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what are the first things you should when you are attending your first year of college.

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Christy’s Answer

The first things that you should do when attending your first year of college is getting your requirements such as medical stuff and everything set up as early as possible so that you do not have any holds when registering for classes. Next, get comfortable with google calendar. THIS WILL HELP YOU A LOT. With your google calendar, set up your enrollment appointment and set reminders so that you can get your desired classes on time. Get your desired classes saved in your shopping cart in advance so that when your enrollment appointment comes, you just need to click submit. Once you get your classes, go through your syllabus and set reminders for midterms, finals, and large assignments and set a reminder two weeks ahead of time so that you get time to prepare for them. Get your university portal, housing, and canvas saved as a bookmark on your laptop because you are going to visit them a lot and you do not have time to search up the website. Also, have your major requirements bookmarked so that you can make sure that you are on track. Download the required apps that you need for your university such as dining etc.

Make a realistic schedule. Make time to study, to hang out, to call your parents, to cook and get food, to do laundry, and to walk around campus. Join a club or some sort of organization. Find a community that fits you so that you have a support system away from home. Try your best to attend 100% of the lectures. Make sure to set a time once a week to clean your room or area because you can forget to do it and slowly your room will accumulate a lot of dirt, gunk and can get gross easily. Your environment really affects your physical and mental health, so make sure to take care of your environment. Also, try your best not to sleep in a lot because you won’t be productive. Make sure to meet with your academic advisor once in a while to make sure that you are on the right track and to see other options that students take. They may even refer you to programs that you didn’t know existed. I would want to say avoid getting a job your first quarter or semester on campus so that you can get used to campus life and balancing school. You do not want to overbook yourself in the first quarter because that is when you are exploring campus and making new friends.
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Yasemin’s Answer

Hi Andres! Great question! Off the top of my head, I would definitely stay organized and carry a planner, be aware of resources to use like the writing center and tutoring service as these are part of your tuition, and stay in touch with your adviser. I think it's important to start strong in college as a freshmen, as one answer also notes it is hard to raise your GPA after freshmen year if it gets affected too much. College especially as a first year is new change for many individuals, and it's important to be responsible in balancing life. For example, my class on Fridays would begin at 8 am and one day the professor couldn't make it and I was ride sharing with my parents so I had to stay on campus until a certain time. This is where the important decisions come into play, such as where I decided to study and complete my work because in college independency is great but it is also important to use it wisely. I loved being able to study on my own but it's important to make sure you can avoid distractions-which is why being organized is great! Lastly, I would also work on creating good relationships with other professors, you never know when you might need a reference or recommendation or even just to stop in and get extra help during office hours-which is a great resource to use! I hope these all help and I wish you the best future undergrad!

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Kaleigh’s Answer

Hi Andres!

I think this is a very good question. Something that I found very helpful during my first year of college was to first get to know and connect with the people around you-whether that be in your dorm, classes, ect. This can help you build a support system in a new and unfamiliar place so that you feel more comfortable and confident at school.

Additionally, I think trying out new clubs, activities, classes can be really valuable when you get to your first year of school. This is a great time of exploration so that you can determine your interests and areas of strength. In the long term this will be a great foundation for your career and life after college as well as help with your overall happiness at school.

I think most importantly, be kind to yourself during your first year of school. This is a huge change for you so it may take some time to adjust to the workload and new environment. I would encourage you to look up the resources at your specific college such as career services, disability services, psychological counselling, ect. A lot of times schools have so many different resources to help for any kind of situation that you may encounter so I would encourage you to research these early on so that you have tools in your toolbox throughout your entire college career!
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Jeremy’s Answer

Hey Andres,
I believe that the first year of University is a big stepping stone in ones life.
If you are living in the dorms for your first year I highly recommend that you try to make a housing meeting with your dorm mates in order to set rules and boundaries so that y'all done end up hating each other by the end of the year. I think a great way to make friends if by leaving your door propped open. You hope to be welcoming and inviting. This sounds cheesy but I did find it to work and I found some great friends during my first year with this method. I also suggest that you join a club, sport, or an organization. This is another amazing way of making friends. You can find some people with similar interests and ideals. Depending on your university it might be a bit harder to make friends in your classes because some lectures end up being in giant halls with more than 200 people attendance.
Other than social life I suggest that you look into your proposed major. As a first year you can really explore different majors and take different classes to see what you are really interested in. Figuring out all the requirements for your major will help you a lot in the long run. One app that helps a lot is Google Calendar or any other type of calendar app. With this you can organize all of your classes in a uniform way and add any other events. This helps a lot with time management and organizational skills.
Try to have a lot of fun and make memories, but also remember that school always comes first !
Good luck !
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Lauren’s Answer

Hi Andres,

Excellent Question! Overall, I think it's important to get involved in different organizations that might interest you. Networking and creating those connections with fellow students early on will definitely help you get settled into college. During welcome week there are usually events were all of the student organizations attend; you'll be able to learn more about them and sign up for those that you'd like to join. I highly encourage you to look into it at whatever college you decide to attend.

In terms of preparing for course work, the best advice I could give you is to try your best to stay organized, have good time management, and learn to balance both your academics and your life outside of school work. What really helped me when I was in college was having a planner that I could keep track of my schedule in. After the first week of the semester, I would usually take the syllabus I had for each of my classes and write down when everything was due for the whole semester so I'd be able to plan ahead each week on what I needed to get done. Overall, don't be afraid to branch out and get out of your comfort zone. Try your best to capitalize on each and every opportunity that comes your way.
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Samantha’s Answer

Build connections! Join things you are interested in and make friends there
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Jacob’s Answer

Hi, Andres,

That's a great question and I think you have two answers with a lot of really great advice. I'll add a few thoughts of my own from more of a social/experiential perspective.

I cannot think of a single thing I actually went out and did that I regret in college. Those four years provide you with an incredible number of opportunities to try new things and think in new ways. On the other hand, I can think of many things that I did not do that I do regret. Inertia is one of the hardest forces to overcome. Take advantage of the opportunity to try new things and consider opposing points of view. Push yourself outside of your comfort zone, whether that is striking up a conversation with someone you don't know or trying to join a new organization. You will experience both success and failure during your college tenure - strive to learn from both. There will be many times when you will look at yourself in the mirror after a long, tough day - always have the courage to try again tomorrow.

Best of luck to you and take care.
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Susan’s Answer

When I first went to college, it was the first time I was away from home. I was away from my parents rules, I could really do whatever I decided to do, and although there was some apprehension, it was quite liberating. I always had a good relationship with my parents but to be out on my own was also exciting. There was a lot I took for granted from my parents, I think it is more a sign of age you are at the time more than anything, but up to this point, I had never had to budget. The money I had, was just for me to frivolously spend. I did what I was told when my parents asked but now no one was asking, so I needed to take action off my own observation and learning. The classes the first year felt like an extension of high school, so they did not seem hard to me, so I ended up with a lot of free time, and that leads to parties, TV watching, gabbing with friends in the dorm, and going off finding fun things to do. Discipline went a bit out the window. It was easy to get caught up in the fun and kind of forget the goal. So here is what I recommend. 1) Make a list of things to do, and prioritize them. Today everyone has a phone and it is easy to set "To Do" reminders in your phone. Don't just hit snooze, feel good knowing you completed the tasks timely 2) Keep a clear view of the goal of why you are at school, it is only 4 years, and you'll have fun, but what you are there to do is to learn, so you can achieve the life you want. 3) If you are not sure yet, of the major you will select, make sure you reach out to your class advisor early upon arrival. There are tools the school has to help you link interests and hobbies to careers. 3) Create a budget, you only have so much money, mom and dad are not an endless ATM, you need expense money, ie gas for your car, or fare for a bus or uber, food, if you are not in a dorm, rent and utilities, after you figure out all that always save for a rainy day (i.e. you are sick and need medicine, you are auto maintenance or repairs, a bill is higher than you expect it to be. After that if there money left over that is what you have for fun, ( movies, sporting events, day trips) Remember be respectful of the money from mom and dad and use it wisely, if you have to get loans, remember one day they will need to be paid back, so it seems like free money but it isn't 4) Discipline - this is the first time you will be living with little structure, and if not in a dorm little to no rules, you know right from wrong, but discipline is like a checklist, to do's get done, homework is timely, commitments are met, spending is under control.

You think you know a lot and you have come along way, but always remember you have a lot to learn. When I went to school, my parents either thought I was mature enough to handle it or I would learn from my mistakes. I still don't know today, but when I left for college, I just enjoyed the liberty and freedom, and the community of the college with so many young people. Fun was always available, and I did not follow the advice I gave to you above, I went to class, didn't think I had to read, and study much, and brought home all C's and a B. Once you dig a hole in your GPA it takes forever to get it back up. When future employer's don't know you, they look at your resume. To even get an interview in today's world that resume needs to be beefed up, employers look at GPA's , how you helped the community, extra curricular activities, and social media, so although you did not ask me, remember not every drinking, partying, and social activity you participate in needs to be published on the internet. Think before you post.

Good Luck, as you continue to take on the world, and be great.
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