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How much pay can you get working with STEM?, if you can that is

#stem #women-in-stem

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Subject: Career question for you

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John’s Answer

Aleeciah it’s no secret that in today’s job market, STEM – or Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics – is in demand. Graduates and school leavers are constantly being reminded of the importance of obtaining tech skills in order to be competitive, with many of the top-paying jobs in the world coming under the STEM umbrella. It’s not just today’s market where STEM jobs are king, either – its tomorrow’s, too. As technology evolves and we become ever more reliant on the digital world around us, occupations within the STEM field are likely to replace many traditional professions. Careers related to STEM are on the Bureau of Labor Statistics' list of occupations the government agency predicts will have the highest average employment growth over the next decade. STEM workers earn a median annual salary of $89,800. That is more than double the $42,000 median wage non-STEM workers earn. Regardless of the level of education you plan to attain—high school diploma or associate, bachelor's, master's, or doctoral degree—you can find a suitable STEM occupation.

ASSOCIATE STEM DEGREE – Associate's degree programs enable you to develop a solid foundation of knowledge relating to a particular field. Some of the most commonly offered associate's degrees in STEM fields are those in computer science and information technology. Some of the careers available to graduates of these programs are computer support specialist positions as well as web developers and digital designers. As you develop more experience, you may be able to move into other careers with higher earnings and more responsibility. From a high school diploma or GED, it takes 1.5 to 2 years to complete an associate's degree.

BACHELOR STEM DEGREE – Bachelor's programs give you a deeper understanding of your area of study as well as related subjects that you may encounter in various positions. Bachelor's degrees are more commonly preferred in a lot of STEM fields. Some of the most common bachelor's programs within STEM are those in mathematics, information technology, and computer science. A degree in computer science or IT can open doors in careers such as a software developer, database administrator, computer network architect, or computer systems administrator. A bachelor's degree takes 3-4 years from high school to earn.

MASTER STEM DEGREE – Master's degrees are graduate degrees that take around 1.5 to 2 years to obtain after completing a bachelor's degree. They provide you with a more concentrated and in-depth understanding of specific subject areas. Common STEM degrees at the master's level include those in information technology and data analytics. Earning a master's degree in one of these fields can help you to meet the requirements for higher-level positions as well as work as a computer and information research scientist. Some medical-focused STEM careers also require a master's. For example, if you would like to become a nurse practitioner, then you would need to (ultimately) earn a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN).

Hope this helpful Aleeciah
Thank you comment icon Thank you :) Aleeciah R.
Thank you comment icon The real opportunity for success lies within the person and not in the career Aleeciah. John Frick
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Francisco’s Answer

Hi Aleeciah,

As you know, STEM covers a lot of fields in science, math, engineering, and tech. Therefore, salary ranges are pretty different from one profession to the other. Even within one single field, depending on your concentration or field of study you will see differences. Personally, I can speak to engineering salaries. An average mechanical, manufacturing, industrial, or similar engineer can expect $60K-$70K salary as an entry level student. Depending on the geographic area and the company this may shift up or down, but that is a good average range expectation. Over time you can definitely increase your salary via promotions, merit increases, or simply by moving upward in the company which can lead to six-figure salaries.

Sorry I can give you a definite answer for all STEM, but you can also do some research online for specific fields and find the salary ranges in different areas and states. Hope this helps.
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Tiffanie’s Answer

Hi Aleeciah,

Great question! There are a lot of fields in STEM you can enter and the location you work in as well makes a difference. I can say that in the Washington DC Metro area and most places in the US with an Engineering degree you can leave college making 90k+ If you have an internship in school you may be able to start at 100k+.

Here is a really great list of salaries for engineering degrees:
https://www.snhu.edu/about-us/newsroom/stem/types-of-engineering
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Jaydee’s Answer

A STEM education can allow you to move in multiple directions in a career. If you personality is not sitting behind a computer or being completely hands on but you want to be in the spotlight a bit - there are roles is Sales or Pre-Sales. These roles will keep you traveling, talking, meeting new people and allows not just an excellent income but keep you on the cutting edge of more than one technology.
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Heather’s Answer

It depends on what you do in STEM, what company you work for, where you are located, what industry and the level of experience/degree you have. There are many types of careers, each demanding its own range wages. The range for an experienced manager in a large corporation can range from $70-200K, plus bonus and benefits. Again it all depends on the above factors. A person right out of school is going to be at the lower end of the range, whereas a person in NYC or San Fran with 20 years experience will be at the upper end of the range. I've even heard of directors making upwards of $300K in some companies but that is not typical.

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UZOMA’s Answer

It depends on what the STEM related occupation is, the employer, skill level and your location. If you are considering entry level tech jobs like a software programmer or cybersecurity analyst, the pay range could be anywhere from $65,000 to $80,000. This pay range is basically at that level for chemical engineers, STEM professors and so on. You should expect your pay to continue to increase as you grow in your industry. Many STEM employers provide great benefits like health insurance and retirement funds. It's important to also note that monetary pay is not the only value you should be looking to get. Non-monetary benefits like work life balance, work culture and potential for growth as other things you should consider as well. Many STEM occupations allow for things like remote work, reimbursement for professional certifications and continuous learning (technology always changes).
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Jai’s Answer

Aleeciah, the short answer is it depends upon the location, your STEM mains (e.g. computing, engineering, etc) and area you pick after the degree. From exp if you join any good multinational graduate programme you could target $60-70k+ or $100k+ if you are fortunate enough to be selected by a global tech companies e.g. MS, FB, Google, Amazon. Once you are in there then sky is the limit - the harder/smarter you work the bigger you grow financially and careerwise. Best of luck for the future!

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Muhammad’s Answer

Hi Aleeciah,
Good question as STEM has wide-ranging scope so the salary range also varies which part of STEM you are talking about.
From Engineering and Project Management standpoint you can look for starting range between 50+K to 70+ as a fresher and then you can grow up the ladder.
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