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What if you cannot commit to one major when you're in college

like if you are already attending a class and you found out its not your thing, is it too late to change? major college

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John’s Answer

Aaron if you are within your first 60 credits, you have a better chance of moving your credits and course work around to another major, changing your major when you pass the 60 credit threshold (about two years of coursework) may be fraught with issues. Thus, If you think you will be changing your major in the near future, research the implications at your college, community college or university before you get too far in your coursework. In other words, plan you transfer proactively. The sooner you can make the decision to change your major Aaron, the better. Your first two years of college will probably be all or mostly general education requirements, and they’re more likely to work for multiple major requirements, which is good. But the longer you wait to decide to change your major, the harder it can be, because you’ll be taking more specialized classes that may not apply to your new major. You may lose credits you’ve already earned if they’re not applicable to the major you’re changing into. And if you need to take additional required classes to fulfill your new major requirements, they could eat into your electives or, worse, you may have to pay for summer classes or more semesters of tuition. We’re talking time and money. Regardless of why you choose to change your major, make sure you research it thoroughly and take your time. Weigh the pros and cons of the situation to decide if this is something you really want to do and if this is right for you.

STEP 1: CHOOSING YOUR NEW MAJOR – The first step is to try to choose a new major, if you haven’t already. If you’re not entirely sure which major to pick, it’s time to get back to basics—things like working backwards from careers that interest you, thinking about your favorite activities, acknowledging your skills, talking to friends and professors in different departments, and even auditing a class or joining a related campus club to get a sense of what the program entails.

STEP 2: MEET WITH YOUR ACADEMIC ADVISOR – They are your biggest ally in figuring out everything you need to do and all the requirements you need to meet to switch majors. They’re also used to this process, so they can answer your questions and guide you through it. It would be great to consult an advisor from your intended major, but if you’re still not sure about what your new major will be, then you can just visit your current academic advisor.

Hope this helpful Aaron
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Ed’s Answer

First off, its never too late to change. I know when you're going through it, it can seem all consuming, but you have your whole life to get it right. I have many friends and coworkers that started in one major or even graduated and decided they wanted to do something completely different. Sit down and ask yourself what it is that really interests you, and that you love doing. Then do a little digging to see if that can lead to a career and provide for you one day. The trick is finding that balance, or at least understanding that not every college degree comes with an immediate 6 figure salary on graduation day. My son thought about majoring in Political Science. Nothing's wrong with that, if that's your passion. I had him look through the want ads in the Sunday paper for Political Science jobs, and he could not find any. I explained that if it was his passion to pursue it, but understand that that path usually requires a masters, phd, or law degree to get where you want to go. He decided on Economics and with Computer Science minor, and is now a data scientist. Hope it works out and feel free to reach out if you have any questions.

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Nafatari’s Answer

Hopefully you pick schools that have at least 3 things you are interested in major wise. That way you don't have to transfer to a different school.

If you don't have to transfer you will simply change your major via paperwork. You will still need to complete the course work you registered for... Because it's the middle of the semester... But let's say you wanted to be an engineer. You get accepted to the school of engineering.
You take your first semester with of courses.
Ex.
Calc 1
English Comp 110
General Physics 1
General Physics lab
General Biology 1
General Biology lab
Intro to Psychology

Now with those classes you get to the middle of the semester and hate all things Physics. Bio and calc were ok but you cannot see yourself in engineering or science any more.
You did however love Psychology and the professor was truly impactful and the work just spoke to you as something you need to explore. You decide to leave the major and persue Psychology.

Now at some schools, no big deal. You speak with an advisor and in the spring take more social science courses and your good to go.

At other schools they may require a gpa min to transfer into a seat with in the School of Human Services for the psychology department at that school. Still not a big deal, it's all still paperwork that an advisor will work with you on and change your major.
I promise it's not that stressful.

Just be careful because you don't want to switch to extreme majors.... Say Math majors switch's to Art major.... There will be more art courses they missed and will need to take before they can graduate on time.

All in all your paying for this so yes you are allowed to switch majors, it's a Convo you have with your academic advisor and they will make sure you will be in track to graduate.

My advice is to always apply to schools that have at least 3 majors you may want to explore.

Good luck
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Lauren’s Answer

It's never too late to change your major. Don't be afraid to explore different types of classes. On average, college students switch their majors at least five times.
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Swati’s Answer

Like others have said, it's never too late to change! You can also "audit" classes in the majors you are interested in, which will allow you flexibility to observe the class without committing up front.

I'd recommend contacting your advisor so they can guide you further. Be sure to inquire about any deadlines and requirements for graduation before switching majors.
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Stacey’s Answer

Hi Aaron,

It is normal to feel unsure when choosing a major, it is a very big life decision. However, there are many options at your disposal while in college. The first place i would start is with your guidance counselor. They have likely dealt with hundreds of other students that are feeling similar to you and can provide great insight. Next I would consider creating lists of the pros and cons of each major you are considering. Keep in mind that your overall interest in the major should be the most important factor in making a decision. Lastly, if there are multiple majors that peak your interest you could consider double majoring or majoring in one thing and minoring in another.

I declared three separate majors in college before landing on my final choice. You are not alone. Just focus on what is best for you and do your best!
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Brad’s Answer

It is never too late to make a change. I would start by contacting your advisor at the college or university you are attending. Additionally, there are add/drop dates and withdrawal deadlines associated with each semester. I would ask your advisor about these deadlines to help better understand your options related to the class you mentioned.
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Joanna’s Answer

It is never too late to change your major. You can always take summer classes if you need to catch up to graduate in the time frame you would like (i.e. four years for an undergraduate). Take this time to explore what you love. There are classes that almost every major requires Freshman and Sophomore year. During those years, maybe take one course each semester that you think may interest you or you are aiming to find more about the specialty. You can also join clubs or organizations.
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Katherine’s Answer

Hello Aaron!

I’m going to suggest an alternative path: give courses (and yourself) a chance. Make sure to deeply reflect on what isn’t working for you so that you redirect your path in the most appropriate way. This is part of learning and also part of discovering what career path best suits you.

Sometimes the teaching style isn’t for you, but the course material is. Sometimes a subject you don’t enjoy can lead you to pursue another that interests you far more.

Katherine recommends the following next steps:

Reflect on what about the course is unsatisfying.
Seek out courses which might qualify for more than one major if you’re unsure.
Remember that struggling and getting things wrong is normal (it’s part of learning).
Go after the kind of major that will help you do work you find rewarding.
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Victoria’s Answer

I changed my major twice. Simply put, I didn't know what I really wanted to do. I knew what I was good at, but I wasn't really set in my path enough to say that what I was studying was my *passion*. I started out in pre-med and absolutely hated biology. I was a year in when I switched, and I'm so glad I did it. I switched to something I enjoyed more, but quickly realized that it just wasn't feasible and switched in that same semester. I picked business with a concentration in finance and found my home. In the end, who cares how many times you switch your major or when or even why? As long as you get where you need to be in the end, you're good. Besides, if you really think you're too far in, you can always double major. You never know, some courses you've already taken might count for both majors. It also looks super cool on your resume. Just something to think about!
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