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Is it better to major in an arts related field or minor in it?

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Renee’s Answer

I have a degree in Art History, a minor in sculpture, but my career is in technology. I'll echo August's sentiments, it entirely depends on your desired career path.

If you plan on pursuing something within studio arts as a career, be prepared to learn to stretch every dollar and have a very solid financial background or support system. Starting salaries are in fact low. However, something like graphic arts is more financially stable with a more obvious career path.

I would suggest you pair an arts degree with something more technical. For example, maybe you have an informational sciences major, and a studio minor. There are several brilliant contemporary artist who use technology as a partner in creation, and base their work on patterns found in information. In addition, a deeper understanding of computers, both practically and theoretically will make you more a better candidate on the job market and could inspire your next brilliant piece! That's just an idea though. Dig deep and think about what inspires you, brings you joy, and how you want to spend your time. You'll find your pairing there.

That being said, having a college degree is important so study whatever you need to stay engaged and get through the program.
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August’s Answer

That is a very difficult question, because it depends entirely on the path you think you want to chart. For myself personally, I majored in graphic design, and have been one ever since. That's not to say because I got my degree in graphic design that I stayed static, as I now do a lot more video and audio editing.

You can literally major or minor in anything, but how broad your skillset is rests upon how much you love learning.

Again, I'll cite it'll depend on a specific path you set for yourself. For example, maybe you major in film, but have a keen interest in art history; someday you become a documentary filmmaker who likes posting art restoration videos. I once knew someone who majored in computer science, and she ended up working as a lighting director at Industrial Light and Magic. She has since gone back into medical school. The point being, she didn't even major in art, but ended up working in film anyway.

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Audrey’s Answer

I like Renee's answer and would go a step further: I wanted to get a Theater degree. My mother told my I could, but I had to get a second major. I decided to add Mathematics. Because of the type of math I was interested in, I was essentially studying two things that had no practical value. But they both taught me important things about how to think and approach problems, how to build arguments, how to speak... and I got my first important job at Netscape (look it up, big deal) specifically because the hiring manager wanted to meet someone who'd studied such odd things. It basically made my career.

It's not as hard as you think to double-major -- often there are classes that are required for both degrees (people rarely end up with so little overlap as I had).

Go for what you love! Twice!
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Sanjana’s Answer

It really depends on your interests. From my understanding, both majoring or minoring in an arts-related field will still be sufficient for you to get jobs in that field. If you are confident it is an area you are truly interested in, it doesn't hurt to major in it. If there is another area of interest that you would also like to study, consider majoring in one and minoring in the other.
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Sabrina’s Answer

I am a firm believer in studying what you love. Many times employers want to know you completed college as a touchpoint for knowing you can master something and show fortitude in working within the system to get it done. So many people have found themselves with degrees and still do not have all the functional skills for the job they want. Often times these skills can be acquired on your own, or will come with experience on the job. With that in mind, if you have talents in another area, employers might find it beneficial to bring those skillsets to use in your job. It will help you stand out from others.

Referencing Renee's answer, you can always minor in a more "practical" area, but my suggestion is to select a major that you truly love to study!
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Robson’s Answer

It really depends on what you want out of your education. I picked one that let me a develop a professional portfolio upon graduation and majored in a design course. That said, you don't need to major in art to have a portfolio, but it is helpful when your major quite literally demands for it! In my opinion, choosing that path allows you the space to experiment, make mistakes, get better – that is quite rare when you step into the professional world of art and design.
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