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What sorts of words stand out to you when evaluating a resume.

I decided to use the word innovative because I can be given a lot of material and make connections. I love research, there are so many avenues. #research #criminal-justice #human-resources #recruiting #cyber-crime #job-application

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Paul’s Answer

Hey Melissa,

Hope you are doing well and thanks for posing this question!

From a sourcing perspective, as a recruiting professional, keywords are strong drivers of relevance in my searches.

Sourcers (recruiters who specifically focus on searching for relevant candidates) will index for specific traits by utilizing keywords in what is referred to as a 'boolean string'. For example, if I were looking for a senior software engineer candidate who is an expert in Java, I might try the following:

("Senior software engineer" AND "Java")

This is a very basic example but boolean strings can get as complex as they need to depending on the needs of the job. For instance, maybe we might need a senior software engineer who specializes in Java or Ruby or Golang but is also within the fintech domain. In this instance, I might try:

("Senior software engineer") AND (Java OR Ruby OR Golang) AND (fintech OR "financial company" OR "financial services")

You can try these out on google search or LinkedIn as boolean logic applies to most search engines.

One idea is searching for a profile of someone who has your aforementioned keywords of:

"research criminal-justice human-resources recruiting cyber-crime job-application"

When you find a strong profile, you can take a few keywords and construct your unique profile based off of your career goals.

If you have any questions, or you would like me to review your resume, please feel free to reach out to me directly and I would be more than happy to help out!


Cheers and best wishes to you,

-Paul
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Cherelle’s Answer

When reviewing a job posting, play very close attention to the skills and competencies listed under the qualifications section. These are key words that most HR rofessionals look for in a resume because these skills align with what we are seeking in a qualified candidate and during the recruitment and selection process.
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Molly’s Answer

Volunteer/Community engagement experiences.

Molly recommends the following next steps:

Find one cause you're passionate about, it will help determine your possible fit for a company culture.
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Daniela’s Answer

Hi Melissa,


Power words make a sentence, or resume, stronger. Sometimes there is little difference between applicants for a job, and a strong resume can help you to stand out, or at least make the cut for an interview. Here is a list of power words for a resume for various fields:


Management Power Words: Built, Demonstrated, Developed, Enhanced, Facilitated, Generated, Impacted, Implemented, Negotiated, Revitalized
Sales and Marketing Power Words: Closed, Collaborated, Delivered, Drove, Established, Generated, Increased, Presented, Prospected, Retained
Accounting Power Words: Analyzed, Audited, Justified, Prepared, Processed, Reported, Researched, Reviewed, Verified
Healthcare Power Words: Assigned, Assessed, Assisted, Cared, Charged, Monitored, Nursed, Provided, Secured
Technical Power Words: Analyzed, Built, Consulted, Created, Escalated, Formatted, Integrated, Maintained, Programmed, Set up, Supported, Troubleshot
Academic Power Words: Applied, Authored, Counseled, Developed, Educated, Evaluated, Mentored, Nourished, Researched, Taught, Tutored


Resume Writing Tips
Before you even start writing your resume, find out if there is a certain format for resumes in your industry. If you are applying to a local, small business, the format would not be as important. If you are ready, here are some things to remember.


Honesty is the best policy. Fully explain any gaps between jobs and be accurate about skills, training, and experience. If you lie on your resume and the company wants to hire you, they will probably check on at least a few things. If you have lied, they definitely won’t hire you. It’s a big risk to take that they won’t check everything.


Make your writing strong and positive. Do not use “I” or “me” and start each description with a power word or an action word. Some examples of action words are:


achieved, administered, coordinated, decided, improved, introduced, investigated, modernized, planned, promoted, and updated.
Write using an active voice rather than a passive one. Active voice is more concise and easier to understand. If you don’t know what active voice is, as opposed to passive voice, this example will show you.


Active: I managed a team of seven people.
Passive: A team of seven people was managed by me.
Passive voice is sometimes confusing and vague; whereas active voice tells it like it is and adds impact to your writing.


Your resume should be one page long unless you have a long work history. Using the active voice will shorten the sentences which will help. If it is still too long, try to rewrite the descriptions.


To be professional, include a cover letter. The paper for this and the resume needs to be good quality and be white or ivory. Make sure to use an easy to read font that is between 10 and 14 in size.


Last, don’t forget to proofread. There are words that sound the same and are spelled differently, like “there” and “their” to watch out for. Also, some typos make new words, so spell check won’t catch them.


Read more at http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/word-lists/list-of-power-words-for-a-resume.html#Wt2EwYPMPSJVPWEB.99


Best!

Thank you comment icon Thank you! I find this very beneficial. Melissa
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Debra’s Answer

I look for accomplishments and responsibilities - not necessarily specific words. I also hate misspelled words and words that are used incorrectly as stated by the previous person (there for their, for example). On the other hand, I do not expect a resume to only be one page long. That "requirement" or expectation definitely differs by profession or occupational field... especially when it comes to the field of education or higher education. And of course, there is a difference between a resume and vita - which comes into play if we're talking about higher education. If you have important accomplishments and information you need/want the person to see, you shouldn't have to break your neck keeping a resume to one page. Cover letters are also a good way to provide some piece of info or accomplishment you might not include on your resume. However - don't make cover letters too long either. I hate 3 page cover letters - that's too much. One page max on the cover letter; it's an "introduction". ..and that can be a good place to briefly explain any gaps in your work history.
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