Skip to main content
4 answers
6
Asked 577 views

Biologists, what does a typical work day look like for you?

I'm curious about this job because I'm interested in pursuing it after post secondary. Do you guys have to travel a lot? Work in unusual climates? See alot of insects?

#earthscience #stem #biology #science #education #tech #marine-biology #computer-science

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

4 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sarah’s Answer

Speaking strictly from my experience, I was a biologist in Vancouver for a while, doing a lot of water quality and environmental monitoring. Biologists do a lot of work on construction projects. A typical day includes getting your gear organized and calibrated (pH meters, turbidimeters), driving out to site, taking measurements/collecting data, and going home to complete reports/field logs.

For example, for a few sites I would drive out to and take water samples upstream of the current construction project (for a background measurement) and then take samples downstream of the project to see what affect the project was having on the surrounding water quality. I would also take lots of photos to document the condition of the site, and determine whether the construction project was affecting the surrounding environment. For example, if there was significant sediment runoff offsite, I would document this and ensure that the construction company fixed this issue. If I saw a dead bird or animal, I would document this and try to determine how the animal died (if it was directly related to the construction activities).

Sometimes I would be knee deep in mud along a highway, collecting fish, mammals and salamanders. We do a lot of amphibian and fish "salvaging" where we collect animals that are being affected by the construction project, and move them out of harms way to a similar habitat.

Right now I have switched to wildlife biology. Here, we do a lot of nest sweeps and amphibian salvages. These are usually out of town shifts, where you stay in hotel or camp for 7-21 days. For nest sweeps, you drive out to site, walk the proposed construction area, and try to find bird nests. Its like a big treasure hunt, and when you find nests its very rewarding. If we see a bird on the nest we alert the construction company and they have to install construction setbacks to ensure they do not disturb the nesting bird. When doing amphibian salvages, we are usually at a wetland trying to clear out all the amphibians from that area before construction plows over it. Another very rewarding aspect of the job. Otherwise we do surveys such as breeding bird surveys (auditory and visual surveys), raptor nest surveys, amphibian sweeps, etc.

When you're not in the field (which is often during the winter months), you are usually in the office or at home on your computer helping to write reports. The reports are typically about what you found in the field, where you include photos and notes you took during the field visit.

There are many other "Streams" of biology, like aquatics, environmental, and fisheries. You get to choose which interests you the most. We travel a lot, so you have to be ready to be away from friends and family for long periods of time. We work outdoors (with all the bugs), in all kinds of weather. Usually in remote areas (unless you work in the city like I did in Vancouver).

Please note I am just starting in the biology field as well, so I may have glazed over many other aspects of the job. Feel free to ask further questions :)
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brooke’s Answer

It will depend on what area of study you focus on. Biologists have a wide range of research opportunities in plant and animal life. Time is often spent in a lab to analyze and research collected specimens. The following link includes more information on what the career may entail: https://learn.org/articles/Biologist_Career_Definition_Job_Outlook_and_Education_Requirements.html.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Saji’s Answer

biologists study the natural world, using the latest scientific tools and techniques in both laboratory settings and the outdoors, to understand how living systems work. Health Care: Biologists develop public health campaigns to defeat illness and prevent the spread of deadly diseases
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

T.’s Answer

it regularly includes venturing out to far off areas to concentrate on creatures right at home in their natural habitat for significant stretches of time. In addition, surveying and deciphering the impacts of natural or human elements.
0