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Which program prepares you more for the nursing degree. A 1+2+1 SUNY/Nursing program to earn your bachelor's degree or should you do 2 years RN first then 2 years earning your bachelor's degree.

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Joshua’s Answer

In my inpatient job I trained under a number of associates degree nurses. Most are getting their BSN part time. This can be a good setup as many hospitals will pay for the RN to BSN. I would compare costs, and avoid for-profit or 100% online programs. Also, check the programs graduation rate and NCLEX pass rate. Either path can be good, just make sure you go to a solid program and don't get to far in debt(though nursing has many good loan repayment options too). Their are ASN programs that are better than BSN programs and vice versa.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice. Tara
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Galo’s Answer

When it comes to preparing you for nursing, either program will do. Both programs have to prepare you for bedside and the NCLEX (board test). Nurses who earn their ASN and pass their licensing exam work in the same settings as those with a four year degree (departments including the intensive care unit, mental health, pediatrics and the emergency department). The advantage of a 2 year degree is that you get out to the workforce quicker with the same level of training as a 4 year nurse. The downside of a 2 year degree is that it limits you in the future, as some roles require 4 year programs and some hospitals push for their nurses to gain their BSN after being hired.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. Tara
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Warda’s Answer

BSN is a degree from a 4-year program which means the person with a BSN has graduated from a four-year nursing program at a university.
ADN is a diploma from a 2-year program.
whether you do a 2-year program or a four-year program will be up to you and your future goals. Most hospitals are requiring RNs to have a bachelor's degree now. My advice will be to go to a four years program and attend the six months residency.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Tara
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Jessica’s Answer

It is nice to do the degrees all at one time from the same school. I planned to get my ADN and then return to the same school for my BSN. I took a year off in-between. ADN is a great way to get into the field, start working (making $), and then find your niche. After my BSN, I did nothing more for many years before then deciding to get my CNM education (basically a specialty APRN). If I didn't have my BSN it would have taken me longer to reach that goal or I might have not have pursued it at all. It is always good to keep your options open and a BSN will do that for you either way. Good luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice Tara
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Cinthya’s Answer

The ADN nurse (2 yr program) although faster has its limitations. In California most acute care hospitals will only hire BSN nurses. As an ADN nurse you will find yourself working in Home Health, SNFs (skilled nursing facility, aka nursing home), or LTACH (Long Term Acute Care Hospital, like a Kindred). The pay will also reflect this as well. A BSN nurse is paid more than an ADN nurse because of the branch of the industry they work in.
You should also research if your ADN program credits will transfer to the BSN program or if you need take some other classes for the require entrance of a Post-Licensure BSN program.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for taking the time to help. Tara
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