Skip to main content
9 answers
8
Asked 755 views

What entry level jobs could I take while studying computer programming in college?

What jobs would help me become a better programmer while still learning in college?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

8

9 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Janet’s Answer

Look for internships. Companies and non-profits, local and remote, are always looking for students to help with their technical "grunt work". Look on indeed.com, directly on the websites of local software companies in the Careers section. Contact your college's career center. They should have access to internship sites. Non-profits are always looking for help with their websites - look at one that interests you or a site like idealist.org.
Be flexible with what type of work you will do because learning any part of of software development is beneficial to your broader understanding. Create test scripts for a QA group; website development; report generation; data import scripts; desktop maintenance. Not everything needs to be straight programming. Getting a FT summer internship can lead to a lucrative part-time job during the school year. Technical jobs usually pay better than any other job you could get and, thanks to COVID-19, many of them can be remote so you can work off hours in your sweats. Good luck!
Thank you comment icon This is a good answer Janet — lots of strong advice here... Randy Tolentino
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Zach’s Answer

Many companies have software developer internships. You could also look for roles such as software QA testing, and various types of technical support. An IT job could could provide some early systems and networking experience.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Chelsea’s Answer

Hi Brayden,
Perhaps look for jobs in Technical Support. I know taking phone calls or chats may not always seem like the most attractive job, but a lot of times it is a good foot in the door where you could then use your computer programming skills to move elsewhere within the same company. I personally started in technical support and really appreciate the growth opportunities I've received just because I used that entry level job to get into the door.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Taylor’s Answer

Like others have said, many companies offer a variety of internships to choose from. If your school offers research programs, it could be good to look into those. I have also heard of people doing tutoring in their field, which could help reinforce the concepts that you are learning in your classes.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Pavan’s Answer

You can look for Software Engineer internships in any company. This is a great opportunity at this time because of increase jobs in IT industry and work from home capability.
You can also look for on-campus Research/Graduate Assistant part-time jobs which involves computer programming.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Daniela’s Answer

My advice would be to look for summer internships in the industry. Interns will often be hired after graduation as companies have invested in them. Any internship will make your resume so much more interesting to employers. You could also do some volunteer work. The best would be to try a few different places so you can figure out what you like best. Also, try something related to the classes you like the most. And definitely apply to internships (and later to jobs) even if you don't think you fulfill all the requirements. Good luck!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brad’s Answer

Many companies offer both paid and unpaid internships, which can provide great insight into various industries. I worked for insurance companies (health, Risk Management), Aerospace (Contract employee with Boeing), Industrial Engineering and others. Programming needs for each industry can be different but give a wide experience.
If you have trouble finding such since you haven't yet received your degree, try offering as an apprentice to paid position. If you are closer to graduating go the intern route. If you have a natural ability and can PROVE your skills, apply for any paid IT job you can get such as internal tech support, or production. You can grow from there within a larger company. Good Luck and have fun with it. Programming is a science AND an art form.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

MICHAEL’s Answer

get close to the tech! work at BestBuy in the computer section. Or GameStop. UbreakiFix is another great one. AppleCare from home is fantastic if you are Mac inclined. Try to volunteer to fix/repair/replace/rebuild the PCs or laptops at whatever place you go to work.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Brayden,

Here are some entry-level job opportunities that could boost your programming skills while you're pursuing your computer science degree:

Software Developer Intern: Numerous firms offer internships for students in computer science or related fields. As an intern, you'll be involved in actual projects, giving you practical experience with programming languages and development tools. This hands-on experience can greatly improve your programming abilities and offer valuable insights into how software is developed.

Quality Assurance (QA) Tester: QA testers are responsible for maintaining the quality of software by detecting bugs and other issues. The role involves testing software applications, documenting faults, and working with developers to fix these problems. Being a QA tester can enhance your understanding of software construction, hone your problem-solving abilities, and familiarize you with various programming languages and platforms.

Technical Support Specialist: In this role, you'll help customers with software-related issues. The job often requires troubleshooting and resolving technical problems via phone, email, or chat. While it may not directly involve programming, it can aid in developing strong analytical skills, improving your communication, and understanding the challenges users encounter with software.

Junior Web Developer: Junior web developers are usually tasked with creating and maintaining websites or web applications. Duties may include creating HTML/CSS templates, writing JavaScript code, and integrating third-party APIs. This role can enhance your web development skills, introduce you to various frameworks and libraries, and teach you about user experience (UX) design principles.

IT Support Technician: IT support technicians help users with hardware and software issues in various environments, such as businesses, schools, or hospitals. Tasks may include setting up new computers, installing software, troubleshooting network issues, and conducting user training. This role can enhance your problem-solving skills and familiarize you with different operating systems and hardware configurations.

Junior Database Administrator (DBA): Junior DBAs help manage databases for organizations. Responsibilities may include data entry, creating backups, and optimizing databases. This role can help you understand database management systems (DBMS), the SQL querying language, and data modeling techniques.

Remember, while these jobs can offer valuable experience to boost your programming skills during your college years, it's crucial to keep learning programming concepts and practicing coding outside of work to maximize your potential as a programmer.

Stay blessed!
James Constantine.
0