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If you attended college. Did the education you received in college, prepare you enough to feel comfortable once you got into the career path you took?

Some people go for advanced training or even just years of college to pursue their careers and I would just like to know if people think its beneficial to have attended college for the career they went into.

Thank you comment icon It depends. If you want to go in a specific field, you should have a strategic focus when you're going into college. Align college curriculum with career objectives. Ex: financial advisor If you're not sure what direction that you want to go in, it may not matter a few years down the line. Lauren Haynes, CSPO
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Subject: Career question for you

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Jacqueline’s Answer

Honestly, I am not necessarily working in the exact field that I studied in college however I still feel what I learned was beneficial to career today and my overall development. I currently work in Operations but went to school for Human Resource Management and Business Education. In Operations, I have utilized most of what I gained from my college education. College provided a foundation that I believe I expanded on as I gained more experience in my career. I also beleive that is allowed me to mature as an individual. Do realize that everyone needs to take the path that is best for them and their are many successful people that did not go to college. I do recommend that you have a plan and this is definitely an indication that you are thinking about it.
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Dr. Stephanneth’s Answer

Hi Franscesca,

It all depends on the field which you enter. Health fields usually require some sort of clinical training during undergrad/graduate education. However, you will still need post-education training through work experience, residencies, or externships. Personally, school provided me with basic skills, but mainly critical thinking skills which prepared me to build upon these skills after completing my programs.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. Francesca
Thank you comment icon I agree that some careers require more specialized training/education. For example, I was a teacher and I needed to attend a masters program to help properly prepare me for the classroom. If I had not received more advanced training I would have felt lost. However, now I work in partnerships for a non-profit and I don't feel I needed any specific degree to prepare me, just general professional experience. In my opinion, an undergraduate degree in any major will help you build general skills you need for the workforce and is a great formative experience. Only certain career paths require a specific advanced training. Maeve Cannon, Admin
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Sid’s Answer

Depending on the career path you choose -
1. Specialized areas ( Technology, Medical, Law etc..)
2. Generalized Areas ( Business , Marketing, Management, Consulting etc.)

Specialized Areas: Due to nature of the work you will be ultimately performing, college degree in those specific areas are essential to understand the basics, gain expertise. Decisions you have to take in the job could have an impact in the lives of the people and you will be liable, so proper credentials from a college degree with specialized certification could equip you to be successful in your career..

Generalized Areas: Typically on the job training is most effective for these positions, as you would gain more insight from the actual work experience. Being multi-lingual , good at business writing, communication skills will assist you.

Another approach is to assess the cost of the education against the salary that typical job groups earn based on the level of education and experience. here is a website that you can utilize to assess different areas -
Measuring the value of education : Career Outlook: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (bls.gov)
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Paul’s Answer

Hi Francesca:

Yes, I believe that the major that I took did help me with the occupation that I selected. Matter of fact, I believe that it helped with the various occupations that I held in public service.

There are several major academic elements, within my college education and major, which assisted me. One, was the ability to write and communicate at a professional level. Many of my college professors challenged me to become a better writer, and this definitely helped me when I got into fields such as law enforcement and college education, where it was essential to be successful.

I believe that many elements of a major and college education, can be utilized in many jobs. Economics, helped me to perform Cost-Benefit Analysis, which was required to make rational decisions in purchasing supplies and other resources.

Math, taught me how to perform accounting and budgeting, especially when we need to track how much we spent or needed to spend in a budgeted year. Knowledge of computers and technology, helped me in designing programs to track and monitor attendance and participation.

I know some people might say that their major or college education did not prepare them for their occupation. But that fact is, if you look close enough, it actually did. Yes, there will always be a learning curve for everyone, but once you get assimilated to the job, things will improve.

My college major also taught me how to manage stress and deadlines. Professors always had deadlines for projects to be turned in, so my college major taught me how to pace myself, complete the assignments and how to adapt to the stress involved in completion of these projects.

So, I definitely felt, that once I got into my career path, that I was well prepared to work through the responsibilities and assignments that I received as a member of the public sector. I truly believe that no matter what occupation or career path you choose, college is an great training ground to help you achieve great things in your future career. Everyone will be somewhat uneasy to begin with, when they enter any occupation, but overall my major helped prepare me for success.
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Stephen’s Answer

A lot of what you learn in college is developing intrapersonal skills and learning how to be self reliant and sufficient. This will have carry over for every avenue you explore post college and the life experience is worth it in and of itself.
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Mayra’s Answer

I believe College provides you with knowledge and background, but its as important as work experience as this last will provide with day to day knowledge which will allow you to tackle daily challenges that you can encounter in your role.
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Alistaire’s Answer

Hey Francesca,

I believe that attending college and getting your hands on field experiences of your career choice comes hand in hand. While college may not provide you with true and practical experiences for the job, it equips you with the necessary technical skills (hard skills) that you may require once you start your career journey. While industry specific knowledge can be learnt online, there are many elements that you won't get to experience if you are not exposed to a real-life experience. So, yes, college is definitely beneficial in providing you skills you require, but that is not the only means to your end! It lays a good foundation for you, and the rest will boil down to how much effort you put into understanding your career of choice and how you find opportunities to get some skin in the game.
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Jennifer’s Answer

College help opened some doors on jobs but it does not help feels comfortable with your job. The job training you is what get you feel comfortable and efficient with your job.
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Aleksandar’s Answer

You will acquire basic knowledge needed but most of the practice you would find during your first job. This is completely normal, since this would be your firs real opportunity to apply the knowledge gained during the colleague days and experience it in the "field".
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Kendra’s Answer

For me going to college (majored in accounting) enabled me to be able to get a CPA license for my career in public accounting. Depending upon your career and life goals you could consider college or technical certification. College provides foundational learning, but nothing compares to actual life and career experience. If you are able to intern during college it would be beneficial.
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Solangel’s Answer

Honestly? It all depends on what you study in school vs your career path. But in general, the answer is no. There are some skills that I've carried forward like my business writing skills and use of excel. Besides that, everything else has been learned while at the job.
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Joseph’s Answer

For a specialist technical career like mine, I needed both my undergraduate degree and a postgraduate Masters to have the background knowledge to feel comfortable in what I do. With just my undergrad bachelors , I would definitely been under-prepared; I guess that's because I specialised in a different subfield of physics during my undergrad and respecialised to nuclear physics at Masters level, and it might be possible to feel comfortable in a role like mine with the right undergrad course behind you, but for me the extra study was a game-changer.

It's also not just about education; I think it's quite rare to walk straight out of college into feeling comfortable in a role - it usually takes a little bit of time and often some role-specific additional training before you really feel comfortable. I don't think that training and experience stands alone though, the educational grounding still plays a big role.
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question.
In the college, in addition to the knowledge and skill you can learn, it would training up your critical thinking and analytical skills. It is essential on any careers.
Also, you can establish network with other schoolmates when attending classes and extracurricular activities. It would be your asset in the future.
You can also gain experience to organize activities if you joining different interest clubs. This can give some highlights in your cv especially when applying for your 1st job.
Having said that, for some professional careers, e.g. Medical, Law, Architecture, Accounting, etc., you would need a bachelor degree to obtain the professional qualification.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Osayame’s Answer

I personally do believe in higher education, it’s broadens your horizons in terms of perspective. It also exposes you to other cultures, experiences, and things you didn’t know you didn’t know. Specific to your career, getting a degree in something tells employers and peers that you’re specially trained in a field, and not graduated from Google Univ. in said field. It’s a more reliable basis of knowledge that employers can more easily trust. College will also empower you and give you added confidence because the higher you progress in a field, the more likely your peers have attended college and no one wants to feel insecure in their job position or knowledge/expertise.
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Priya’s Answer

Hi Francesca,
I think my degrees definitely helped prepare me for my career. My undergrad gave me the necessary knowledge and my master degree gave me great practical knowledge. Of course, you just keep gaining experience after too :).
Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice. Francesca
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Solangel’s Answer

Honestly? It all depends on what you study in school vs your career path. But in general, the answer is no. There are some skills that I've carried forward like my business writing skills and use of excel. Besides that, everything else has been learned while at the job.
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Amy’s Answer

Hi Francesca,
I guess it depends on what you major in.
If your major is related to a profession such as veterinary science, accounting, etc., what you learn at college will help you a lot in understanding the basics when you start your career.
On the other hand, the majors such as business admin helps you to learn more general things during your career like… how to approach a problem/project, how to find a best solution, how to build relationships with people, how to collaborate, and how to develop a presentation skills, etc.
Both may not give you enough confidence or comfort when you start your career as real daily life in your job would be different from you you learnt. However, it will help you to understand the basics.
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