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What will my medium pay be as a construction manager?

As a person who has never worked before, this is my most curious question considering my motives and the goals I want to achieve.

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Hassan’s Answer

https://www.salary.com/research/salary/benchmark/construction-manager-i-salary/chicago-il says the average pay in Chicago is $124,500 but
https://www.indeed.com/career/construction-manager/salaries/Chicago--IL and other sources say its ~$90,000.

Keep in mind that it takes many years of construction and supervisory experience to become a construction manager. Some positions will also require a bachelor degree.

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Hiep’s Answer

Hi Nakene,
It's a good question and I think most of the students are curious about the salary of their dream job. Besides the salary, you should be looking for a place where you can grow yourself and be yourself. After three years, when you have good skills and competence, you can more focus on the salary but not now.
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Samuel’s Answer

Construction Manager is a broad term that is sometimes misunderstood.

A pure CM is a firm that wins a bid and then 'buys out' the work in subcomponents by hiring subcontractors. As an entry level person, you would be an assistant to a CM or Deputy CM for a company, typically a constructor-side company (like a General Contractor or CM Firm).

On the Owner's Side (i.e., DOTs, DPWs, Port Authorities, government agencies, you could be working for a consulting firm or directly for the agency. In the Northeast US, starting salaries range from $22 - $28/hour for people still in school and working as interns, or ranging from $33 - $45/hour for people with some intern experience and a college degree.

Entry level positions for Owner-side roles, where I have the most experience to share, include inspector, office engineer, or Project Controls specialists.

The inspector is on-site and oversees the constrution activity and reports on compliance with contract documents;

the Office Engineer is primarily a bean-counter for the project, and takes care of reviewing the inspectors' reports, calculating payments to the contractor, and tracking labor, design issues, and change orders;

someone who works in Project Controls may work with P6 schedule development or review, BIM 360 modeling and updating of models, document tracking and control (keeping track of correspondence, Requests for Information (RFIs), shop drawings, submittals, and drawings), and may have a role with the estimating team (the estimating team for an Owner usually calculates the costs of extra work not included in the base contract).

Overall, this is a very exciting field!

Note that pay rates outside of the NE and NYC may be less. Rates vary with cost of living in certain US locations.
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