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How to cope with panic attacks what kind of skills do you use personally I like to meditate

How to cope with panic attacks what kind of skills do you use personally I like to meditate

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Darius’s Answer

Hi Mr Vibes,

I'm definitely not an expert in this - but I can add my perspective;

1 - Breathing exercises are always helpful
2 - It's very important to get the necessary sleep time
3 - staying hydrated is important
4 - Finally, I think working out/ exercise is the best remedy.
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Sikawayi’s Answer

Hello Mr. Vibes, thank you for your question. For me what seems to work is to lay down and keep very still. I take slow easy breaths and wait on the panic attack to pass. I don't seem to have a lot of symptoms as to what brings my attacks on. I do know some people who do yoga, I even know a few people who bake in order to deal with the effects of a panic attacks. Best of luck
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Frank’s Answer

Sometimes panic attacks could be related to being overwhelmed with things. In this case, I would recommend writing down everything you can think of that needs your attention and bucket it into categories (work, school, home, etc.). Sometimes seeing everything you need to take care of can help you make a plan and reduce the stress or anxiety. It may also help you prioritize your focus if you see that while some things need to be done immediately or this week, there could be other things that can be done next week or even later this month.
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Scott’s Answer

Various breathing exercises always help. A quick Google or YouTube search will provide you with several options!

Remember you are not your thoughts
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Asad’s Answer

Hey there! I agree with Elizabeth's post above. Breathing exercises are incredibly beneficial, to me, and that's the key, this is a very personal issue that everyone has a different experience with. I find that breathing, and physical exercise work best for me. If you're able to, I recommend going out for a jog or if the weather or scenario doesn't allow for that, try doing some jumping jacks, pushups, sit ups, anything to get your heart and breath going!

Hope this helps and best of luck!
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Elizabeth’s Answer

Hi Mr Vibes

Please allow me to start off by saying that I am in no means an expert in this area. That being disclosed, I am happy to share how I cope with stress and panic attack moments

There are a number of free apps for smart phones or other devices that offer breathing exercises, mediation and motivational quotes. I find the two minute ‘breathing exercising’ on my Fitbit to be just enough to calm my nerves.
The breathing exercising and mediation allow you channel your focus and energy away from the stressful trigger.

The more your practice breathing/mediation, the easier it gets. You will also start to recognize the situations that trigger the stress/panic. In time, I believe you will learn to ward them off, or address them at an earlier stage. Earlier identification will make coping and recovery easier.

Keep breathing!
Thank you comment icon I am really grateful you took the time to answer this question. MrVibes
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Katie’s Answer

Hi MrVibes,

Meditation is a great idea, especially if its something you already like doing! I'm a psychotherapist, and I help people with anxiety all the time, but I still sometimes get it myself. One of the things I've learned that's helped the most is that the fact that you still get anxiety from time to time doesn't mean you're failing at your coping strategies. The key is to just keep calmly showing up with love for yourself as many times as you need to.

I agree with many of the answers I've seen here- using breathing tools can be extremely helpful, and there are some great apps to help with that if you're an app kind of a person. Doing physical activity also has great benefit- science has shown that it actually can help you move out of the fight, flight, freeze parts of your nervous system and into the parts of your nervous system wired for connection and calm. Spending time regularly with friends who truly seen you and accept you can also help.

And, one of my very favorite ways to cope is to let the wise/calm/nurturing part of myself talk to the stressed/judgemental/scared part of myself. What's great about this coping strategy is that you don't have to stop feeling anxious to do it. Instead of trying to get rid of the anxiety, you consciously ADD awareness that there are parts of you with untapped resources who can swoop in like loving friends and get you through things. You can do this by having an out loud conversation between the parts of yourself somewhere where other people can't hear you, or you can do it on paper in a journal. Or, you can do it in your head. It can help to name the parts (mine are The Anxious Child and The Wise Adult).

I hope this is helpful! Thanks for asking your question!

Katie
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Jaden’s Answer

Hey MrVibes!

Firstly, I appreciate the vulnerability in even asking such a question that may be difficult to discuss, in addition to struggling with.

As someone who struggles with anxiety and panic attacks myself, I find many of the previous comments mentioned provide some really useful methods that I have actually practiced overtime myself.

Since Panic Attacks are a bit spontaneous, I feel like practicing breathing techniques can be really beneficial in immediate moments or setting/occasions where you may feel one might arise.

Although, these may be temporarily beneficial techniques, and you may need to seek other forms of assistance in the future - these are some atypical techniques that have helped me in the literal moments of experiencing a panic attacks (especially to buy myself some time when in a setting where I don’t have the space or time to meditate)
• Breathing or (breath work)
• Eating a peppermint or mint
•Drinking cold water
• Getting up to walk around and stretch
• Placing something cold on my head or stomach (Preferably something chilled or an ice pack if you have one)
• Talking to someone near about anything (It could be about their shoes or class work- it does not have to be important)

I feel as though since panic attacks can be a little very trying on the body, these methods have helped me find the ability to ground myself again. Especially since your body may become tense, hot/cold, shaky, I find being able to do something to regulate these symptoms has been very beneficial.

I know panic attacks are not an easy or fun thing to deal with at all, so it is more than okay to take your time in practicing these methods and remember that if one method doesn’t work, that doesn’t mean that trying another won’t.

Nonetheless, I hope you keep taking care of yourself and are able to find some long-term, beneficial coping methods!
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Maren’s Answer

Hi Mr Vibes,

Thank you for asking this thoughtful question! I deal with panic attacks myself and understand how challenging it can be to find the right coping strategies for you.

Particularly as it pertains to anxiety/panic triggered by work or school stressors, these are some of the coping strategies that I utilize:

-Breathing exercises: There is a really awesome app that I use called Finch which has a variety of resources. One of my favorite functions in this app is their "First Aid" section which is perfect for finding breathing exercises to reduce panic or anxiety. I definitely recommend checking this app out and seeing if any of its resources can be helpful to you as you cope with panic attacks!

-Taking breaks: Step away from everything for 5-10 minutes. Focus on the things that are going well. Either use the time to positively reflect or to do something that you love! It will energize you and give your brain a break from the stressors that are contributing to your panic attacks.

-Cold showers in the morning: This one might not sound as appealing, but I can personally attest to how helpful it can be! Take your shower with warm/hot water, and then for the last 3 or so minutes (or as long as you can) turn the water to cold. Cold temperatures are helpful in slowing down our heart rate (which tends to increase in times of panic).

Remember, 9 times out of 10, things turn out better than we anticipated. Reflect on all the times you were worried something bad would happen and what the result actually was. Usually we build things up to be worse in our minds than they actually are.

You've got this, Mr Vibes!
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Candace’s Answer

Hello! I hope this helpful! I am not a expert, but these has helped me cope with panic attacks.

1. Breathing exercises
2. Fresh air ( Go outside for a walk )
3. Positive environment (Find a place where you could go to relax and center yourself)
4. Journaling ( Every time you find yourself having a panic attack write down how you are feeling and what led up to that feeling)
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Maeve’s Answer, CareerVillage.org Team

Hi Mr. Vibes!

I think it is so great you are using meditation methods and reaching out to this community to find more ways to support yourself! I am NOT a doctor; however, I want to share something that has helped me a lot.

I find that equipping myself with facts about how the mind and body experience anxiety is extremely helpful. For example, sometimes when I get anxious my heart beats really fast, and it becomes harder to breath. When this happens a thought pops into my head, "Oh my gosh what if I stop breathing?!" and then this drastic thinking makes the feeling of having trouble breathing even worse. However, after doing some research, I learned that I am not in any medical danger when this is happening.

I learned that my brain is simply perceiving something as threatening, and as a result my body tries to protect itself by releasing adrenaline and a bunch of other things that make me feel really overwhelmed and out of control. The facts are that this can't actually hurt you and on average will last about 10 minutes, and can be significantly reduced by breathing exercises. After learning this, I started to replace drastic thoughts like, "what if I stop breathing, what if this lasts forever" to more realistic ones such as, "I notice I'm anxious and short of breath, this is completely normal, my body is just confused, it will pass soon and it can't hurt me." It really helped me to stop fighting and avoiding these feelings, and instead to observe what was going on in my body and let it pass.

Basically, knowing what was going on in my body made anxious moments seem wayyyy less scary. You can check out tons of podcasts/articles etc. that explain the science behind anxiety, and hopefully this helps you experience panic moments a little differently.

an example of a helpful podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-causes-panic-attacks-and-how-you-can-prevent/id470623173?i=1000514969904

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