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Robotics Engineering

Hello, I’m interested in becoming a Robotics Engineer. I would like to know which academic path would be best. Would it be Electrical, Mechanical or Mechatronics engineering? Thanks

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John’s Answer

Jayden Robotics Engineering is a growing field that entails a combination of data analysis, engineering, and computer science. Most people working in these fields use software and mechanical hardware to design, build, and test robots and their related machine-based processes. Which is why each robotics engineering job is unique, and the practicalities of each job in this field often depend on the person’s background. While robotics engineers with coding backgrounds tend to focus more on the software side of things, those with mechanical engineering backgrounds lean toward the physical components of a robot.

Regardless of whichever position you choose Jayden, all robotics engineers should be well-versed in math, electronics, and computer science; should have at least a basic understanding of coding languages; and should be able to work well within a team. While the skills required often take time and effort to acquire, there are clear steps you can take to start your career in Robotics Engineering.

Jayden Robotics Engineering is a complex field built on advanced mathematics, engineering, and computer science concepts, so it’s important to have a solid foundation in all of these subjects. Your first step towards a robotics career will need to be earnings an undergraduate degree focused on mathematics, engineering, or computer science. Studying computer science will prepare you for the coding aspects of the job, while mechanical engineering will prepare you for building a robot’s hardware. You should also take stock of where your interests lie and consider which aspects of this career are the most appealing to you before deciding on which major you choose Jayden.

I hope this is helpful Jayden
Thank you comment icon Thank you for sharing your perspective. Jayden
Thank you comment icon Good morning, and thanks for your response. I never even considered Computer Science. However, it makes sense. Thanks so much! Jayden
Thank you comment icon You need a plans to build a robot. To build a career in robotics, it is even more important to have a plan or goal. Good luck Jayden John Frick
Thank you comment icon Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much. Thank You Dan John Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Dexter. Always find opportunities to make someone smile, and to offer words of encouragement and kindness everyday in life. John Frick
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Dan’s Answer

John Frick's answer is very good!
I suggest you ask yourself which engineering discipline interests you the most: electrical, mechanical, or mechatronics and then target that degree. Each of these degrees are required in the robotics field and any cross-training between them will increase your value.

Mechatronics is better optimized towards robotics and includes software while electrical and mechanical degrees normally/traditionally provide minimal software exposure. However you can normally "tune" an electrical. mechanical, or software degree to include robotics-related material.

Many engineering programs schedule "core" or generic classes in the first year or two (and that expose you to each of the different degrees). This gives you the opportunity to learn about the different options and then ask questions before deciding on a specific degree. You should also (always) work closely with the college academic advisors. Continue to direct questions to your instructors and fellow students, especially the older students who have already taken higher-level classes and/or are already working in industry. You are already on the right track with your CareerVillage question!

Engineering and Robotics make for great careers and will provide many interesting and growth opportunities.
Good Luck!
Thank you comment icon Mr Dan, thanks so much for this response. I will definitely make an appointment with an advisor so i can discuss this. Before I posted this question, I was leaning towards Mechatronics. Again thanks for the response. Jayden
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Joanne’s Answer

Hi Jayden. +1 to John Frick, especially his description that hardware engineering ( i.e. a greater umbrella term encompassing robotics) is combination of data analysis, engineering, and computer science. Knowing basic programming languages and design programs such as CAD are both critical to robotics. In other words, the device or "robot" will act on what they code you design instructs it to do. A mechanical and/or robotics engineer will focus on the math, physics, and logic that makes the device or robot work. In our experience, Aspiring robotics engineers likely would have majored in electrical, mechanical, or robotics engineering. Quite honestly, the "Mechatronics" degree is new to me and I appreciate you sharing the name of that degree. I'm looking in to it. In general, and most importantly, I would also say that our leaders in hardware and/or devices engineering recommend adhering to FIRST principles, or the idea that we should critically question and challenge assumptions that lead to a hardware engineering solution and/or idea. Whatever specific area you learn is your passion, I recommend getting familiar with FIRST principles.

Joanne recommends the following next steps:

Explore the different bachelor's in science degrees.
If you haven't already, join a robotics after school program.
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Elena’s Answer

All three of these types of engineering that you list will be a great starting point to build a base for your robotics career. I would pick the one that most interests you. Find some extracurricular activities outside of class at your university such as any type of robotics club. When it comes time for your internships, find companies that interest you so that you can get more practical experiences. Best wishes for your future.
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Atul’s Answer

My son was involved in the Robotics in the high school and decided to get Computer Engineering degree.
His starting salary was in six-figures plus signing bonus plus stock options. He had did to take 3-hour test before he was granted the interview. He got the job at FAANG companies.
If you acquire Computer Science degree you cannot do hardware design or hardware programming. You can certainly try EE but Computer Engineering is a better career path.
Mechanical Engineering with Computer knowledge is another option depending upon your skill set you possessed.
Thank you comment icon Thanks so much for this response! Jayden
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